A Footnote to History: Eight Years of Trouble in Samoa

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1912 Swanston edition by David Price, email
ccx074@coventry.ac.uk




A FOOTNOTE TO HISTORY
EIGHT YEARS OF...

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... An elaborate courtliness marks the race alone among
Polynesians; terms of ceremony fly thick as...

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...clan or a province impotent. In the midst of these ineffective
councils the chief sits...

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...consuls
interfered, and any war were preferable to the terms of the peace which
they procured. ...

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...mark of consuls; he will be badgered to raise
taxes, to make roads, to punish crime,...

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...the habit of
head-hunting not only revolts foreigners, but has begun to exercise the
minds of the...

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...hosts, it has another side. In one or two words of the language
the fact...

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...by the Roman
contract of _mutuum_. But the obligation was only moral; it could not
be,...

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...ultimately
right themselves. But it is otherwise in practice. Such folk as the
pastor's harpy...

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...the condition--that they should be let alone--is now no
longer possible. More than a hundred...

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...proper; behind, Germans are supreme; beyond, with but few
exceptions, all is Anglo-Saxon. Here the...

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...ago, on a knoll behind a bar-room, he might have
observed a native house guarded by...

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...are office-
seekers, and earwig king and consul, and compass the fall of officials,
with an eye...

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...he to think? He is strongly conscious
of his own position as the common milk-cow;...

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...the expense of maintenance quite a fleet of ships
must be remembered, and a strong staff...

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...run round the country, and the natives
shudder about the evening fire. For the Samoans...

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...certain
remarkable man of the name of Theodor Weber. He was of an artful and
commanding...

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...an indignation which
he does not seem to have been able to keep to himself; and,...

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...ever really supported) that he was
soon dropped and had soon sold himself for money to...

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...very like orchard-breaking to the
British schoolboy; at the best, it will be thought a gallant
Robin-Hoodish...

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...least surprised if they met him, a few
days after, enjoying the delights of a _malanga_....

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...papers to a
sovereign. The administration of justice was the colour, and I am
willing to...

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...private of an
amorous and sentimental turn, but no one would have guessed it from his
solemn...

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...house was thronged with chiefs and
orators; he sat close over his loom, delightedly weaving the...

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...The consuls
of England and the States were there (the excellent gentlemen!) to
protest. Last, and...

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...for
the tropics which lies so often latent in persons of a northern birth;
difficulty and danger...

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...Lake; and there is evidence to the
effect that he was followed to the islands by...

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...So might a fly irritate Caesar.

The arrival of a mission from Hawaii would scarce affect...

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...entertaining
the plenipotentiary of a sovereign power in treaty with his own king, and
the captain of...

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...gathered a posse of
warriors, marched out of the village, brought back the fugitives, and
clapped them...

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...much being
granted, can it be thought exorbitant to suppose them possibly in fault
for the squabble...

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...only did as they
were done by. The sufficiency of these excuses may be left...

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...letter was received. By 7.30 Becker arrived in person,
inquired for Laupepa, was evasively answered,...

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...going to obey the German consul," replied
Tamasese, "whose wish it is that I should be...

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...make war on that government district"--was thus
commented on and reinforced. And the meeting was...

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...sides, and were fired upon. One boy was
shot in the hand, the first blood...

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...a man of certain virtues, which the Germans
had now given him an occasion to display....

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...not again see one another in this world, pray that we
may be again together above."...

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...finished, but when it
is, you shall live in one of my rooms until I can...

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...horses, which had windows and many decks"; plainly an omnibus. Here
(at Bremen or Bremerhaven,...

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...the throne, and Brandeis behind it; and I have now to
deal with their brief and...

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...theirs is the blame or the credit.

To understand the feelings of self-reproach and bitterness with...

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...the royal seat the flag of Germany for the new flag of Tamasese. It
is...

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...Moors applied to Sewall, ranking consul. After some
search, Martin was found and refused to...

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...to protest. Receiving no reply,
he issued on the morrow a proclamation bidding all Americans...

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...all to be in
by April 20th, which if it is not, "not one thing will...

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...thousand, Apia (many whites refusing to pay
taxes since the suppression of the municipality) might cost...

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...the
point of view of the white residents.

The common charge against Brandeis was that of favouring...

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...three hundred dollars. The
German firm accepted a mortgage of the whole province of Aana,...

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...the hour; and I am glad to find it clearly set forth in a
despatch of...

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...leave to accept an engagement in the company. "I will not
allow you to make...

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...same
observer who conveyed to him this warning thinks that, if Brandeis had
himself visited the districts...

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...man's fault to be too impatient of results; his public
intention to free Samoa of all...

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...heads
were buried in a beef box, and the pastor read the service. The body...

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...cents currency--between
nine and ten cents gold. Yet even among the traders a strong party
feeling...

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...by the big thumb
of Bismarck, when he places "sensitiveness to small
disrespects--_Empfindlichkeit ueber Mangel an Respect_,"...

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...she might have proved a dangerous antagonist in narrow waters
and at short range. Doubtless...

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...Chief Seumanu had been still detained in Mulinuu under anxious
observation. His people murmured at...

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...the _Eleele Sa_; and Becker, in conversation with the British consul,
replied that he recognised none....

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...the enterprise in Mulinuu. So that we may call
this false intelligence the beginning and...

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...where
the Siumu road strikes in at right angles to the main street of Apia.
They told...

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...children brought them water. The young sappers
worked crouching; from the outside only an occasional...

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...in one hand, a basket of three heads in the other. A fellow came
shot...

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...silly lad,
in mere lightness of heart, fired a shot in the air. My native...

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...taken
advantage of the rain and darkness and stolen from their forts
unobserved. The rallying sign...

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...Tamasese, actually fortified
him in his old position.

The real story of the negotiations that followed we...

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...the reply.
"Becker had changed his mind before Knappe came." Why, then, had he
changed it?...

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...look on; words were exchanged, blows
followed; sticks, stones, and bottles were caught up; the detested
Brandeis,...

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...to expand or to
contract it to any conceivable extent, so long as Mulinuu was still
included;...

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...to request you to inform me whether or not they are under such
protection? Amicable...

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...proposed post, from its position, and from Leary's well-established
character as an artist in mischief, must...

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... And
Tamasese had at last to be produced. To him Kane delivered his errand:
that...

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...Mulinuu the much defended lay desert.
Tamasese and Brandeis had slipped to sea in a schooner;...

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...cuts in
half the English and American quarters, he closed by proclamation and
advertised for tenders to...

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...have replied in the affirmative, and
declare that they had begun to back the boat. ...

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...drunken mob is a drunken mob, and a
drunken mob with weapons in its hands is...

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...sure it is not wise. It may be sometimes necessary to
offend for a definite...

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...nothing to surprise in this discovery; and had events been
guided at the same time with...

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...of feasting; but they made of it that house of mourning to which
the preacher tells...

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...his umbrella on that
spot of ground where his mat had been stretched and he had...

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...to his English
colleague, he prepared a continuance of evil days for his successor. If
the...

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...the pickets continued to exchange
from either side volleys of songs and pungent pleasantries. Nearer
hostilities...

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...have been already bruited abroad;
yet they were not fired upon. From the point they...

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...heads; but so far from improving the advantage, yielded
immediately to the weakness of the Samoan...

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...ministered by the _Eber_ to Tamasese, in the
shape of uncountable German flags. The full...

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... It came on to rain as the Americans landed; and
though none offered to oppose...

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...were. "_Ifea
Siamani_? Which is the German?" cried the old gentleman, dancing, and
with his...

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...Hope told a flattering tale. He awoke to find himself
exchanging defiances with de Coetlogon,...

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...And Mataafa having communicated Knappe's letter,
the example of the Germans was on all hands exactly...

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...the credit of Germany among the
natives of both sides; the Tamaseses fearing they were deserted,...

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...the Tamasese monarchy should cease.
It was one which the German refused to consider. And...

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...was set, and Knappe dressed to receive his visitors. The
second consequence was inevitable. ...

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...will continue to do against
the insurgents precisely as little as they have done heretofore." ...

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...same import or have been gone
about in the same way. Germany was bound to...

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...to their
adversaries, "you will know of a difficulty, and our guns shall be made
good in...

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...her true course and
continued to move up the lagoon with an offing of some seventy...

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...were to fall at all,
he had best fall with dignity. Not a shot was...

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...the garden. Thrice,
at least, it was necessary to repel them by a sally. ...

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...up, and I am told on native authority
that, besides the three heads, two ears were...

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...far as Sunga, the _Eber_ was yet in the bay, the smoke of battle
still lingered...

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...was entering
Laulii Bay when the _Eber_ brought him the news of the night's reverse.
His heart...

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...to be more complete. But the other
consequences were of a darker colour and brought...

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...mind,
and the results of a marsh fever contracted in the lines of Mataafa,
reached Honolulu a...

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...it. Calumny ran high. Before the dead were buried, while the
wounded yet lay...

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...band upon their arm, so that his men should recognise and spare
them. The hint...

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...and menace like a conqueror. Active
war, which he lacked the means of attempting, was...

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...of scandal. Knappe was justified in interfering; he would have
been worthy of all condemnation...

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... I hear the German
consul was on this day prostrated with fever; charity at least...

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...We think a public man fair game; we
think it a part of his duty, and...

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... I give
but three of its provisions. The crime of inciting German troops "by...

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...and a mere sop to Knappe's
self-respect. I am tempted to believe the rumour in...

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...conduct good." It must be a hard heart
that does not sympathise with Knappe in...

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...moorings the
year through, and discharge, and are loaded, without apprehension. Of
danger, when it comes,...

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...twenty-five up to five hundred tons, and a number of
small craft, further encumbered the anchorage....

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...the pressure of the squalls the bay was obscured
as if by midnight, but between them...

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...a dreadful
commentary on their danger; which was swelled out of all proportion by
the violence of...

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...have found a natural joy in
the exposure of his life; and twice that day, coming...

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...rudder was at
the moment--or it seemed so to the eyes of those on board--within ten
feet...

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...From the doomed flagship
the Americans hailed the success of the English with a cheer. ...

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...perhaps the best in the
harbour, and von Ehrhardt signalled that ship and crew were in...

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...wrecked ships, he paraded the
band of the _Trenton_, and the bay was suddenly enlivened with...

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...American
sailor was to have his tavern broken and his stock destroyed. Many of
the publicans...

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...made thus a marking epoch in world-history; directly, and at once,
it brought about the congress...

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...his
native shores. For two years the unfortunate man had trembled and
suffered in the Cameroons,...

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...face in conditions of exasperating rivalry. The one
returned from the dead of exile to...

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...which should be judged with mercy; the problem is sometimes
so insidiously presented that even a...

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...private, of
a most engaging cordiality. But there was one point, I scarce know
whether to...

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...some trickery lay lurking,
filled him with the breath of opposition. Laupepa seems never to...

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...Upolu; but she has
the weight of numbers, and in these latter days has acquired a...

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...discussed in certain quarters, it took all men by surprise. The
inhabitants at large expected...

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...our rebel that
saved us," he said, with a laugh. There is now no honest...

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...applying it to another, of which the writers
know less than nothing, and no European knows...

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...here in the Tuamasanga. The fate of the Savaii attempt I
never heard; it seems...

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...that condition were not
agreed to and faithfully observed, he must send in his papers. ...

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... It may have been _B_'s own, in which case he
were the more unpardonable; but...

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...captain of one of the war-ships to shell the rebel village; the
captain, conceiving the extremity...

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...see them scatheless. Already, on their way
from the court-house, they were tumultuously surrounded by...

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...it was barbarous and a foul example to set
before a race half barbarous itself; others...

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...tall palm in Malie it
should be possible to descry against the eastern heavens the palms...

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...roof-tree
for their sovereign. And the lodging is typical. I take up the
president's financial...

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...Judge, then, what is muttered of Laupepa,
housed in his shanty before the president's doors like...

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...and receiving salaries. They
have built, indeed, a house for the president; they are believed...

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...five hundred fighting men
are always within reach; but I have never seen more than five...

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...withhold his followers from war, but to send them
to be judged in the camp of...

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...be it was among the woodland clients of the sire
that the son acquired his fancy...

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...than itself. The
gentleman appointed to be Natives' Advocate shared the chief justice's
opinion, was his...

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...but compact and fervent following of the Catholics, the other has
the sympathies of a large...

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...a natural but certainly ill-grounded prejudice, and allow to
him, who was sole king before the...