An Inland Voyage

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from 1904 Chatto & Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org Second proof by...

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... ...

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...two hundred pages, it
contains not a single reference to the imbecility of God’s universe, nor
so...

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...33
PONT-SUR-SAMBRE:
WE ARE PEDLARS ...

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... ...

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...to the workmen and speed to the work_.
_On the financial aspect_, _I would not willingly...

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...in a
sailing-boat; but in so little and crank a concern as a canoe, and with
these...

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...a nice place, and is only remarkable for one thing: that the
majority of the inhabitants...

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...part, I am
body and soul with the women; and after a well-married couple, there is
nothing...

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...c’est long_.’

The canal was busy enough. Every now and then we met or overtook...

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...in some foreign country on the banks of
the canal, and then come home to dinner...

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...success. And then we uncorked the bottle of wine, and
sat down in a ditch...

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...and the surface of the canal was thrown up
into an infinity of little crystal fountains....

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...with English boating terms, and the names of English
boat-builders and English clubs. I do...

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...still quite
legible in their hearts. They had still those clean perceptions of what
is nice...

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...to an hotel. He would
not join us at our dinner, but he had no...

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...to disgrace our native land by messing an eight, or toiling
pitifully in the wake of...

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...globe, it seems, except from where I do. My ancestors
have laboured in vain, and...

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...all this. In a place
where you have taken some root, you are provoked out...

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...African traveller, or gone to the Indies after Drake? But
it is an evil age...

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...of fair weather.
But the wind blew so hard, we could get little else to smoke....

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...fantastically marked. One
beast, with a white head and the rest of the body glossy...

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...to
me, I smiled gently and shook my head as though I were an inoffensive
person inadequately...

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...sea,’ he added, ‘and to defend one’s life
against great fish.’

I felt I was becoming a...

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...and threatened him with
corporalities; or I suspect we should have had to find the way...

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...near
the bottom an iron letter-box.

The inn to which we had been recommended at Quartes was...

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... But manners and bearing have not a
wider currency than bank-notes. You have only...

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...say, it is against the etiquette of the universe—to sit at
the same table and pick...

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...cried cheerily on the inhabitants. He was a lean,
nervous flibbertigibbet of a man, with...

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...deal less of his mother: let us hope she will
like it as well as she...

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...upon the landlady and the two labourers. In all
essential things we and the Gilliards...

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...sound of mighty
snoring: the Gilliards, and the labourers, and the people of the inn, all
at...

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...intervals, and one notably, when we were
skirting the forest of Mormal, a sinister name to...

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...tree;
but if the wood grew together like a banyan grove, I would be buried
under the...

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...train, my little young man,’ said he, I and go you away home
to your parents.’...

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...expected; for the
weather next day was simply bedlamite. It is not the place one...

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...over fallen comrades, batter and
bemaul this slip of skin from the loins of peaceable donkeys.

Generally...

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...idea for a collector. You could not help thinking how many
night-caps had wagged over...

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...of sunshine set our hearts singing; and when the rain was not
heavy, we counted the...

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...in April. There should be a
flageolet, whence the _Cigarette_, with cunning touch, should draw
melting...

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...had not been rich enough to make it as it ought to be.

‘The fire should...

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...he went on, ‘—very well, he sees nothing.
And then death is the end of all....

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...front, that there seemed to be no issue;
only a thicket of willows, overtopped by elms...

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...threescore years and
ten. The reeds might nod their heads in warning, and with tremulous
gestures...

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...should
have just ploughed up the Mountain Daisy. He was the only living thing
within view,...

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...hundred yards a tree had fallen across the river, and
usually involved more than another in...

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...for
this was his last ambuscado, and he must now join personally in the fray.
And still...

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...in Origny
Sainte-Benoîte, when we arrived.




ORIGNY SAINTE-BENOÎTE


A BY-DAY


THE next day was Sunday, and the church bells...

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...pluck of the sentiment redeemed
what was weak or wordy in the expression. The martial...

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...the pick of Origny, I
should suppose.

The _Cigarette_ had some mysteries to perform with his rigging...

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...from all sides through the clear air;
and the bells were chiming for yet another service.

Suddenly...

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...up into the seventh heaven? or come safely
to land somewhere in that blue uneven distance,...

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...beginning to put forth fresh sprouts, and blossom
into something worthy of himself; and yet none...

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...eye, seeking
approval. His wife appeared now and again in the doorway of the room,
where...

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...conversation opened with details of the day’s shooting. When all the
sportsmen of a village...

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...‘Ask him a bit,’ said
they. ‘Just ask him.’

‘Yes, sir,’ said he in his quiet...

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...easy in our ways,
he regretted having let us off so cheaply; and taking me aside,...

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...were not present at our start,
but when we got round to the second bridge, behold,...

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...It
ran so fast and merrily, through all the windings of its channel, that I
strained my...

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...friends, to-morrow is as good as to-day. And if he die in
the meanwhile, why...

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...fortune or misfortune at their
own private pace, like a clock during a thunderstorm.

We made a...

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...politely, thinks the _Cigarette_—if we could have beds: she
surveying us coldly from head to foot.

‘You...

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...be a pedlar in reality!’ He particularised a
complaint for every joint in the landlady’s...

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...to have heard
Bazin by way of antidote. He had delighted in the museums in...

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...fields. Kine, and horses, and little
humorous donkeys, browse together in the meadows, and come...

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...me flail
the water with my paddle like a madman. The _Cigarette_ was greatly
amused by...

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...before ever they were
thought upon, is still a church, and makes as brave an appearance...

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... After a while a long train of young girls, walking two and
two, each with...

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...but I wished the old
people somewhere else. It was neither the right sort of...

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...the wife sat in a far corner watching us. I
think we were worth looking...

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...breast; there was no
need to work hard against an eddy: but idleness became the order...

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...any great or immediate result of her life, she will
not have lived in vain for...

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...performances as possible; and I found that even
the _Cigarette_, while he pretended to despise my...

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...I hardly thought they would have condescended on a bill.
But they did, with some smart...

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...keep to ourselves, and never speak unless we have trodden
on a man’s toes. In...

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...second was a
disappointment. As soon as the tale became in any way perspicuous, it
lost...

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...there is a romance about the
matter after all. Probably the table has more devotees...

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..._ego_ and _non
ego_, preoccupied me whether I would or no. There was less _me_...

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...my strokes and
forgetting the hundreds, the happiest animal in France.




DOWN THE OISE: CHURCH INTERIORS


WE made...

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...together. Her eyes, with which she interrogated
mine, were vacant of sense. It depends...

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...stir in my heart; and yet how we should have wearied
and despised each other, these...

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...home. Yet I could not help fearing that, where
the Saint is so much commanded...

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...no hire for his last songs, preferring
to serve his country out of unmixed love. ...

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...of these slim figures, all corseted and ribboned, produced
an answerable disturbance in our hearts. ...

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...nowhere, nowhere, ‘not even on the borders of Germany,’ had
he met with such misconduct. ...

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...and throw up a situation to go strolling with a
knapsack.

An Englishman has always special facilities...

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...eyes took things in. My companion and I wondered
greatly who and what he could...

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...to life: a ragged, tippling,
incompetent old rogue, with the manners of a gentleman, and the...

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...a pleasant vein of talk as he has, with a ready smile at his own
mishaps,...

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... And to know what art is, is to have an interest for
ever, such as...

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...flower, what a work
should we not make about their beauty! But these things, like...

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...of the paddle. Now we were to return, like the voyager
in the play, and...