Catriona

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...Transcribed from the 1904 Cassell and Company edition by David Price,
email ccx074@pglaf.org





...

Page 1

... ...

Page 2

...though (for one so ignorant of defence) it
might be called an added danger. The...

Page 3

...with
the other. I was like to have a bad enough time of it with...

Page 4

...I
had seen the matches of by the dozen in my Highland journey. They all
spoke...

Page 5

...and sword, and at the top
of my new fortunes, this was more than I could...

Page 6

...now it seems we have common
acquaintance, I make it my petition you will not forget...

Page 7

...remember I have had the hospitality of
your own country of Balwhidder.”

“It was not one of...

Page 8

...direction, I will
be so bold as come seeking my sixpence for myself.”

“Will I can trust...

Page 9

...money bag out of his hands,
and followed the clerk in.

The outer room was an office...

Page 10

...“and, dod! I believe the day’s come now! Get a ship
for him, quot’...

Page 11

...said I, “but
I need not be repeating that.”

“I am little likely to forget it,” said...

Page 12

...your
name, sir; and it’s my belief the Advocate is still so much to be
sympathised with...

Page 13

...he. “It’s the Campbells, man! You’ll
have the whole clanjamfry of them on your...

Page 14

...part I have no particular desire to harm
King George; and as for King James, God...

Page 15

...bit of dinner, all the three of us. When
that’s done, I’ll give you the...

Page 16

...new lodging than I was up
and into my new clothes; and no sooner the breakfast...

Page 17

...stick; for he accused me of a kind of
artful cowardice, going about at the expense...

Page 18

...end of a clachan on the
braeside among fields. There was a whirr of looms...

Page 19

...and play with under the moving
shadows of the hanged.

My way down the causeway of Leith...

Page 20

...and the corruption of my whole nature,’ so much I
must answer for, and I hope...

Page 21

...would be the best,” said he.

“Well, it’s the Appin murder,” said I.

He held up both...

Page 22

...all
that your lordship can desire. I am not in Mr....

Page 23

...of
waiting in a very burthensome vacuity. The sound of people talking in a
near chamber,...

Page 24

...touched a bell, and a footman came, as at a signal, bringing wine and
glasses.

“You are...

Page 25

...be nameless.”

“If you mean anything by those words, I must tell you I consider them
unfit...

Page 26

...Mr.
Balfour—there is always the possibility of some arrangement, I tell you,
and I tell you beforehand...

Page 27

...be very
different; and I shall press these very questions that I am now willing
to glide...

Page 28

...yes, Mr. Balfour! whether we like it or no, the case is
political—and I tremble when...

Page 29

...a very dangerous place, it is in part of
course because I am not insensible to...

Page 30

...very far from being disarmed: the disarming is a
farce. . .”

“I can bear you out...

Page 31

...please
to set,” said I. “I would not be thought too wily; but if I...

Page 32

...to a painful uneasiness, reaching forth his feet and hands, and his
eyes speeding here and...

Page 33

...you that I never clapped eyes upon the man.”

“Well, well,” said he, “it makes no...

Page 34

...engagements,” said he; “and that you may not sit
empty-handed I am going to present you...

Page 35

...and entertained me for a while with playing and singing,
both in the Scots and in...

Page 36

...to put an end to the present conversation.
I stood beside her, affecting to listen and...

Page 37

...papa returned, the same kind, happy-like, pleasant-spoken man.

“Now, girls,” said he, “I must take Mr....

Page 38

...with the Government even to the extent of acting
Advocate-Depute in the Appin murder.

“Well, Mr. Balfour,”...

Page 39

...suppose, sir, that the whole policy of this country is
to be suffered to trip up...

Page 40

...it can be shown, my great Mr. Balfour—it can be shown, and
it _will_ be shown,...

Page 41

...appeal to him. I put
my life and credit in his hands.”

Prestongrange shut his book...

Page 42

...Park, where I think it very proper you should make your
bow. Call for me...

Page 43

...her father stood to
be hanged for pretty indefensible misconduct. What was yet more
unpalatable, it...

Page 44

...a lass of a clean honour, like a man’s; I thought her one to die...

Page 45

...come now on the young lady’s
invitation.

“O, so you’re Saxpence!” she cried, with a very sneering...

Page 46

...name, you seem
to do the two sides of the talking, which is a very poor...

Page 47

...cries, “as to who and what you are. By your
way of it, you’re Balfour...

Page 48

...weans. And now,” she went on, “there’s no manner of service in your
daidling here,...

Page 49

...when she came up my fears fled away; not even the
consciousness of what I had...

Page 50

...me for very little,” said I, and then stopped. But it seemed
when I was...

Page 51

...testimony which may save an innocent life,” said I, “and they
will not suffer me to...

Page 52

...says he, ‘that I can rely on your pledged word.’ Where is my
word now?...

Page 53

...mountains.

She bid me come again soon, gave me her hand, and left me in a...

Page 54

...he, “it would never do for me to divulge (even
to you, as you say) the...

Page 55

...in the meantime, my misses must be waiting you. They
will never forgive me if...

Page 56

...told him it was, not very kindly, for his manner was scant civil.

“Ha, Palfour,” says...

Page 57

...ignorance in fencing, and so much averse to die or even to be
wounded. But...

Page 58

...And I am sorry for the plow; though
I declare I pelief your own was the...

Page 59

...of that water passed belief. We went through the sanctuary, up
the Canongate, in by...

Page 60

...your hand in the business, and, let me
tell you, I resent it. It is...

Page 61

...expedients; and it made me rage to
think that I might brush against my champions in...

Page 62

...escape of one ill-doer another
was to go scatheless, and the remeid is to summon the...

Page 63

...at the best, and let me get to my facts again. It comes to...

Page 64

...to lie in prison and you are not to see them?”

“And I am not to...

Page 65

...be let in, I laugh aloud in your face.”

It was now my turn. I...

Page 66

...upon ye. Lie quiet until just before the trial,
and spring upon them at the...

Page 67

...of a bit of a rise in the road, I clapped down suddenly among the
barley...

Page 68

...me so
obtuse. Now I would fancy the girl was being innocently made a show...

Page 69

...fighting is to stop, and yet me have the best of it,
just like you and...

Page 70

...night, had almost overcome
me.

“And where will my head be gone that I have not told...

Page 71

...saw the sun decline
sharply and the shadows to run out long, I rose to take...

Page 72

...praise God for your kindness, dear,” said I. “Farewell, my little
friend!” giving her that...

Page 73

...father’s.”

“To be sure you are mistaken there,” she said, with a white face. “Neil
is...

Page 74

...a gesture like wringing the hands.

“How will I can know?” she cried.

“But I must find...

Page 75

...my employment. I saw I had made but a fool’s bargain with
Catriona. It...

Page 76

...my attention had been great, for I had watched not the path
only, but every bush...

Page 77

...the change. These I traced to my lowness of spirits, that
back to my late...

Page 78

...stack of hay, where I couldnae see the nebs of my ten fingers; and then
two...

Page 79

...telling,” said he. “And anyway, that’s over and done:
he’ll be joined to the rest...

Page 80

...make but the ae line of it; if we
gang separate, we make twae of them:...

Page 81

...that night and slumbered.

The day called us about five. A beautiful morning it was,...

Page 82

...down; but I do better with caller air and the lift above my
head. I’m...

Page 83

...brave?” I asked.

“Brave!” said he. “He is as brave as my steel sword.”

The story...

Page 84

...and call in upon a Leyden student?”

“Well, and I would think he could!” cried he....

Page 85

...round pace, we travelled to Cockenzie. Though they were building
herring-busses there at Mrs. Cadell’s,...

Page 86

...replies Alan, as though it were a thing of small
account. And then, “Ye were...

Page 87

...a sign of it,” said I.

“Nhm!” said Alan, “it looks queer. We saw nothing...

Page 88

...ready as a loaded musket.

“Has ye seen my horse?” he gasped.

“Na, man, I haenae seen...

Page 89

...and such a bustle of down-popping rabbits and up-flying
gulls, that the desert seemed to me,...

Page 90

...the coast. Almost at the same
moment of time, and perhaps half a mile away...

Page 91

...else.”

“And you would be the more mistaken,” said he. “What makes the differ
with me...

Page 92

...an affair to call
them in and bring them over, and the boat was making speed....

Page 93

...perhaps to kidnap,
perhaps to murder me outright. From the position of those engaged, the
first...

Page 94

...hand and foot with some strong line, and cast me on a tussock of
bent. ...

Page 95

...lovers—the whole way, and these, perhaps taking us to be
free-traders, fled on our approach. ...

Page 96

...and I saw myself hoe tobacco under the whip’s
lash. The thought chilled me; the...

Page 97

...provision of fuel. All these were discharged upon the
crag. Andie, myself, and my...

Page 98

...sensible man, and a good Whig
and Presbyterian; read daily in a pocket Bible, and was...

Page 99

...was after this somewhat childish pleasure
that Captain Palliser had come so near the Bass. ...

Page 100

...that put these fancies in
my head. He was extraordinarily well acquainted with the story...

Page 101

...wife. Then, indeed,
passion began to work in me; I could not forgive myself to...

Page 102

...secretly as I was first arrested—does that sound like law to you? or
does it sound...

Page 103

...just get a’thing that we want.”



CHAPTER XV—BLACK ANDIE’S TALE OF TOD LAPRAIK


I have yet said...

Page 104

...I took part in, which
quite changed our terms of living, and had a great effect...

Page 105

...whiles when his dander rase to see the Lord’s
sants misguided, and shame covered him that...

Page 106

...wi’ her bag and baggage. And it was
remarked by the sodgers that she gied...

Page 107

...Tod was a wabster to his trade; his loom stood
in the but. There he...

Page 108

...pyking at the line. He thocht this by-ordinar and
outside the creature’s habits. He...

Page 109

...this craig o’ Sawtan.”

Sure eneuch, nae time was lost, and that was ower muckle; for...

Page 110

...he.

“Maybe ay, and maybe no,” says my grandfaither, worthy man! “But have
you a mind...

Page 111

...muckle in hell, but they have a grand time here of it,
whatever!—and the Lord forgie...

Page 112

...was the story of Uistean
More M’Gillie Phadrig and the Gavar Vore.”

“It is no sic a...

Page 113

...next we met,
tormented and oppressed me. The truth was unbelievable, so much I had to
grant,...

Page 114

...were to hang, where would _I_ be?
Na: the thing’s no possible. And just awa’...

Page 115

...seal, that I stood stupid. Catriona’s grey eyes
shone in my remembrance. I thought,...

Page 116

...James Stewart and the court of Inverary; and my mind
turned at once like a door...

Page 117

...Fife, where the Gaelic is still spoken.) “Ay,
ay!” says Andie, “Tam’ll can deal with...

Page 118

...horse should be standing saddled
for me by two to-morrow at Clackmannan Pool. This done,...

Page 119

...could travel; and I was rejoiced to learn that, up to a
late hour that Saturday...

Page 120

...singled out was Prestongrange. He sat well forward,
like an eager horseman in the saddle,...

Page 121

...walls of a house before the street had begun to be
thronged with the home-going congregation.

“Am...

Page 122

...the first time I had had
my say out, or the matter at all handled, among...

Page 123

...speed? He never got a warrant! Well,
it’ll be the same now; the same weapons...

Page 124

...some consequence,” he continued. “The whole
administration of justice, from its highest officer downward, would...

Page 125

...back, and gave various answers, but concurring
practically in one point, that James had now no...

Page 126

...sat and gazed into their glasses, and I could see they found my
attitude on the...

Page 127

...question but I must have touched his heart at our first interview, so
that he has...

Page 128

...lord,” said I.

He still skimmed the paper, and all the while his spirits seemed to...

Page 129

...You have very warm friends in the Miss Grants, who will be
overjoyed to have you...

Page 130

...defence, I am at your
lordships orders; but in so far as it would help to...

Page 131

...a
great dignitary, and one that, in the hour of my need, had reached a hand
to...

Page 132

... With the bluid of ony clan of my aversion.”

James was as fairly murdered as...

Page 133

...leaders in
Israel whether by their birth or talents; and who among them all had
shown clean...

Page 134

...my spirits I had a glisk of pleasure.

But I have not patience to dwell upon...

Page 135

...alarm you with the intelligence that she is now in
prison.”

I cried out.

“Yes,” said he, “the...

Page 136

...your
heart is too much in your duty (if it were nothing else) to have
forgotten Grey...

Page 137

... “And I wager she
guessed nothing . . . But I beg your pardon, this...

Page 138

...ones also. They are all for by-ends, the whole clan of them!
It’s this that...

Page 139

...appear with the same publicity as a
visitor to Catriona in her prison the world would...

Page 140

...and your
bags, for it seems we’re to have your up-put.”

“Na, na”, said I. “Tamson’s...

Page 141

...grey,
He rade the richt gate and the ready
...

Page 142

...to return to the Advocate’s. I was well received by
the four ladies, who were...

Page 143

...she hummed; “and his ain dear Annie and her two sisters had
to taigle home by...

Page 144

...speak with me? She had been there an hour or better,
said the servant-lass, and...

Page 145

...I forgave yourself, Mr. Davie. When
you was in my society, you seemed upon hot...

Page 146

...my papa.”

“He has been a good man to me,” said I.

“Well, he was a good...

Page 147

...so much as
I think convenient for a maid of her age and inexperience. Believe...

Page 148

...most trifling circumstance, such as where I should
tie my hair, or the colour of my...

Page 149

...home,” said I; “and my family.”

“Poor David Balfour!” said Miss Grant.

What passed during the visit...

Page 150

...stand and haud a candle; it’s her and me that are
to crack.”

I suppose she stayed...

Page 151

...kneeled fairly down.

“There!” she cried. “There is the proper station, there is where I...

Page 152

...big feet out of the
platter.” This was the more hard to bear, as I...

Page 153

...the world, but only waved her hand and
smiled to me, and was suddenly carried away...

Page 154

...me.
Prestongrange and his grace the Lord President may have heard of it (for
what I know)...

Page 155

...me to farewell with Catriona, I
would refuse at the last hour.

“Have I not given you...

Page 156

...be the curse of Eve: because she did not say it
when the devil offered her...

Page 157

...this I was
presently aware of a sound of oars pulling, and a little after (as...

Page 158

... ...

Page 159

...of Mr. David, only just that he would sail
upon this very same ship. And...

Page 160

...same adventure into High Germany. One was a Hollander
returning; the rest worthy merchants’ wives,...

Page 161

...was telling and I listening.
Whiles, again, we would sit entirely silent, not communicating even with
a...

Page 162

...The men marched with swords and fire-locks, and some of them
in brigades in the same...

Page 163

...again upon my Uncle Robin, and went with him awhile to kirk and
market; and then...

Page 164

...one end to the other. Now, in this bundle
that I gave her, there were...

Page 165

...you call this, to blame me for some words that a
tomfool of a madcap lass...

Page 166

...anyone except
myself.

Altogether, she was so quick to avoid me, and so constant to keep herself
surrounded...

Page 167

...that we could imitate.

Presently a boat, that was backed like a partancrab, came gingerly
alongside, and...

Page 168

...says she, “but since the year ’46 there are so many of
the honest Scotch abroad...

Page 169

...no minute
lost, and scarce time given for any to interfere if they had wished the
same....

Page 170

...to your father,” said I, little
thinking that I spoke so true. “I can tell...

Page 171

...there—it was
some little way—beholding the place with wonder as we went. Indeed,
there was much...

Page 172

...sake dinna be hasty, sir!” he cried. “I am truly wishfu’
no to be offensive....

Page 173

...inn. I advanced him to
that effect a dollar or two to be a cover,...

Page 174

...we passed, and I was thankful
we had nothing of their language. A little after...

Page 175

...think. But I’ll not leave
you, Catriona; the Lord do so to me, and more...

Page 176

...courage of my heart, it is all broken. Do not be leaving
me in this...

Page 177

...you showed me so much love,” said she.

“And yet I think shame to be happy...

Page 178

...well; but here you show them to excess.”

“Well, then, have you done?” said she.

“I have...

Page 179

...robbed of my purse and all I
possessed in that unchancy town of Rotterdam. I...

Page 180

...if I had
such a sister. But the rub is that you are Catriona Drummond.”

“And...

Page 181

...shame to the Highlands and
the race she came of, and nothing but a hindrance to...

Page 182

...gentleman was not so much deceived but what he discovered a
willingness to be quit of...

Page 183

...thing in the morning I wrote word to Sprott to
have her mails sent on, together...

Page 184

...with which I had continued my vain purchases, I began to think
of it myself as...

Page 185

...to be
admired. I am sure I did it with an ill grace, for I...

Page 186

...that night for rage
and repentance, but walked to and fro on my bare feet till...

Page 187

...and admiration. She seemed
to have no thought of our position, no sense of my...

Page 188

...as I had purposed, but to the house court, which was always a
solitary place, and...

Page 189

...my love; and the next, that she had certainly perceived it long
ago, and (being a...

Page 190

...of her voice.

The concern in which I fell instantly on this address, put me with...

Page 191

...I kissed it, and she bowed her brow upon my bosom,
clasping me tight. I...

Page 192

...hand; and the next moment
put it from me with revolt. She was a child,...

Page 193

...first stood before him in my shirt and
breeches, I believe I took a leaping step...

Page 194

...place upon the side of it; where, after
I had closed the door, I could not...

Page 195

...wait until I understand my obligation a little more in the
particular,” says he.

“Indeed, and I...

Page 196

...in the air. “There, there,” said he.
“You go too fast, you go too fast,...

Page 197

...the meal the
matter of an hour, which will give you an interval to meet your...

Page 198

...weeping; and it is not to be supposed I had been absent from her
pillow thoughts....

Page 199

...customary walk hung miserably on my hands, I cannot say but I
was happy on the...

Page 200

...did not interest me the smallest, and at the door dismissed me with
empty manners. ...

Page 201

...will not be caring much to walk, now
that my father is come home.”

“But I think...

Page 202

...here that would die
for you.”

“I am thanking you,” said she.

We stood awhile silent, and my...

Page 203

...often
than I could at all account for; and even in the course of these few
days,...

Page 204

...so false all through that he scarce knew
when he was lying; and for one thing,...

Page 205

...him for good; but this would
have been to see the last of Catriona as well,...

Page 206

...Drummossie. He did there like a soldier; if
some that need not be named had...

Page 207

...praises.”

She looked up at him, a little wild at that; and he slid off at...

Page 208

...do else? ’Deed, and I cannot tell.”

“I thank you for that,” said I, pretty...

Page 209

...marriage, but I have good reason to believe
there will be much on the young lady’s.”

“This...

Page 210

...you, she and I are to go forth again to hold our talk.
If she can...

Page 211

...step behind,
so that I could watch her unobserved. The knocking of her little shoes
upon...

Page 212

...I were you I would not
wear two thoughts on it. Only it’s right I...

Page 213

...“It is because I am disgraced?” she asked.

“That is what he is thinking,” I replied,...

Page 214

...let us be done with it, let me be done with the whole
Hieland crew of...

Page 215

...you be thinking of this miserable girl?” says she.

“What I am trying to tell you...

Page 216

...by the door, and the father and daughter with every mark
upon them of a recent...

Page 217

...went on again, laying his hand
on his bosom, “outraged in both characters—and I bid you...

Page 218

...little heap that brought my heart into my mouth.
She had left behind at her departure...

Page 219

...of natural resentment.



CHAPTER XXIX—WE MEET IN DUNKIRK


Altogether, then, I was scare so miserable the next...

Page 220

...more necessary to my
daughter’s comfort, though I daresay the sight of...

Page 221

...impossible. Ye must have made a terrible hash of the
business, David.”

“There are whiles that...

Page 222

...the occasion. James professed to
be in some concern upon his daughter’s health, which I...

Page 223

...horses at the post, and found a guide to Bazin’s
Inn, which lay beyond the walls....

Page 224

...she cried.
“Many is the dozen times I will have heard him tell of you; and...

Page 225

...was like a peal of bells, her
face gay as a May morning; and I own,...

Page 226

...a
prospect, where there stood out over a brae the two sails of a windmill,
like an...

Page 227

...French
nobleman, he told me), and we would please excuse him till about noon.
Meanwhile he carried...

Page 228

...the bield of a hillock
before she appeared at the inn door, looked here and there,...

Page 229

...and then came on
again, but more slowly, and I thought with a changed colour. ...

Page 230

...she, and I scarce could hear her say
it.

“I do that,” said I. “O, sure...

Page 231

... And she held the letter forth.
“My mind misgives me, it will be some ill...

Page 232

...a time for all things, Alan,” said I, “and this time is
serious. How have...

Page 233

...Alan, looking back. “The best day’s work
that ever either of you did yet! ...

Page 234

...long story,” says James,
“I think it will keep very well till we have eaten.”

“I’m none...

Page 235

...two furies. I can never think how I avoided being
stabbed myself or stabbing one...

Page 236

...from me.

“Catriona,” I cried, “it was me—it was my sword. O, are you much...

Page 237

...some foolish person holding up his hands, were the
sails of the windmill turning.

Alan gave but...

Page 238

...was finely lodged, and lived in a good style, having a
pension on the Scots Fund,...

Page 239

...complimented us on the event, and gave us a benediction
like a patriarch.

“I have been never...

Page 240

...most disloyal act—for which, by the
letter of the law, he might be hanged—no less than...