David Balfour Being Memoirs Of His Adventures At Home And Abroad, The Second Part: In Which Are Set Forth His Misfortunes Anent The Appin Murder; His Troubles With Lord Advocate Grant; Captivity On The Bass Rock; Journey Into Holland And France; And Singular Relations With James More Drummond Or Macgregor, A Son Of The Notorious Rob Roy, And His Daughter Catriona

By Robert Louis

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...Proofreading Team





DAVID BALFOUR

Being Memoirs of his Adventures at home
and Abroad

THE SECOND PART: _In which are...

Page 1

... SAMOA,
...

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...SHIP
XXXI. CONCLUSION

*...

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...to an
armourer's, where I got a plain sword, to suit with my degree in life....

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...it was highly inconsistent with the
other. I was like to have a bad enough time...

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...Highland journey. They all
spoke together earnestly in Gaelic, the sound of which was pleasant in
my...

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...could not bear to be thrust down so
low, or at the least of it, not...

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...just
come into a landed estate and am not very long out of a deadly peril....

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...been so forgetful that you did not refuse me in the proper
time."

"If it had been...

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...see me then, so soon as what I have to do permits," said I;
and the...

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...from which he scarce raised his eyes
upon my entrance; indeed, he still kept his finger...

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...politics," said he.

"Ye need not," said I, smiling, "for I'm as big a Whig as...

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...well to get some snuff into the
hands of; and as I daresay you keep touch...

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...up," said I.

"Mr. Balfour," he cried, "are ye making a mock of me?"

"No, sir," said...

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...him, for he was a decent stout old
Whig, and had little mind to be mixed...

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...It's just what you said yourself; my father learned it to
me, and a bonny trade...

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...wanting the ship. Then
there'll be Tarn Stobo; but I'm none so sure of Tam. I've...

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...suicide besides, which is to get hanged at the King's
charges.

What was I doing it for?...

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...talked so much and then do nothing.
It's lucky for James of the Glens that I...

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...the gibbet, what
should I strike on, but a weird old wife, that sat behind a...

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...the clean genty maids go by, and look to the other side,
and hold a nose....

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...I can very well
assist you?"

"Why, sir," said I, "I propose you should write to his...

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...pen and paper, sat awhile in thought, and
began to write with much consideration. "I understand...

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... * *




CHAPTER IV

LORD ADVOCATE PRESTONGRANGE


My...

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...room, of a good proportion,
wholly lined with books. That small spark of light in a...

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...am I to understand?"
said he.

"_A tall strong lad of about eighteen_," I quoted, "_speaks like...

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...do by our judicial functions and the service of his
Majesty; and I could wish that...

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...you. It may consist very immediately with your
safety. I have a great discretion, it is...

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...you Alan had no hand whatever in the killing of Glenure."

The Advocate appeared for a...

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...fired the shot) the unmistakable original of the deed in
question. I need not tell you...

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...the conscience of my duties done. After the President, who
else? You know the answer as...

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...fall. And I pray God, if this be wilful
blindness, that he may enlighten me before...

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...I was
indeed much less impressed by the reasoning of the divines than by the
spectacle of...

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...said I, "nor yet anybody else;
but the name I am called, if you care to...

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...poured out to me in this beggarly
vein, or the very short and grudging answers that...

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...misses, and especially
the eldest, who was besides the most handsome, paid me a score of
attentions...

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...that,
Miss Grant?" I asked.

"Why," says she, "if ever you should come to get hanged, I...

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...like a coal of fire. As much as the others cast me
down, she lifted me...

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...to
consult a quarto volume in the far end.

I was thus left (in a sense) alone...

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...for your father's son," says I.

He wagged his bald eyebrows at me. "You are pleased...

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...I. "I think no shame for that. Shame
. . ." I was going on.

"Shame waits...

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...have but to touch this bell beside me to have executed on the
spot. Once in...

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...You must not bear any grudge upon my
friend, Mr. Symon, who did but speak by...

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...the
house.

This looked as ill as possible. I was scarce gone and they were sending
already for...

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...spoken.

The sense of my own constancy somewhat uplifted my spirits, but not
much. At the best...

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...when I came face to face with a grim and
fierce old lady, walking there in...

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...Well, then, where
there's no possible marriage there shall be no manner of carryings on,
and take...

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...of her
face. "I think it was at the Advocate's door-cheek that ye met her
first."

I told...

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...cateran! Davie,
my dear, I think we'll have to make a match of it--if it was...

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...I would find myself struck
dumb. But when she came up my fears fled away; not...

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...I, and then stopped. But it seemed
when I was holding back so much, something at...

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...yourself? You know what
this is, whose father lies in danger. Would you desert the poor...

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...weeping
voice, but I had no tears in my body.

"My heart is sore for you," said...

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...seemed to bear her in my
arms.

* ...

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...the while with a
new pen; methought it was impossible there could be any shadow of
deception...

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...to look extremely big. I heard a whistle sound loud and brief
like a signal, and...

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...you would not find it to agree with you."

"Tit you effer hear where Alan Grigor...

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...my
adversary would, probably pursue and catch me, which would add disgrace
to my misfortune. So that,...

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...set up to fecht with an auld wife, or all the
same as a bairn whateffer!...

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...to follow him to the antechamber, whence I could hear for a while the
murmuring of...

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...instructions, and be blamed by both. For if
I were to tell you what I think...

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...made me a signal and
immediately vanished. Seven storeys up, there he was again in a...

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...to carry news of the
transaction, and the summonsing be something other than a form. Now...

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...mealy-mouthed, false-faced paper
that was printed since in the pamphlet "by a bystander," for behoof (as
the...

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...still wet from the press. "This is the libel: see, there's
Prestongrange's name to the list...

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...is the clue to their ill words
together, for Symon and the Duke can keep faith...

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...the places they would seek. No, ye must
fend for yourself, and God be your guiding!...

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...the house; and upon my perceiving them together
by the open door, I plucked off my...

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...cousin will not be so long."

So I told her the tale of the lieutenant from...

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...was
broken. That is my chief hero. Would you not love to die so--for your
king?" she...

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...Alpin, from whom, I
think, our country has its name."

"What country is that?" I asked.

"My country...

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...little friend_:
so I said--I will be telling them--and here is what I did."

She took up...

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...solitary. If my haunters
had let slip that fair occasion I could but judge they aimed...

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...he had a black knife
(as they call it on the Highland side) naked in his...

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..."keep him but the one hour; and I'll chance it, and say
God bless you."

She put...

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...the midst of it, and returned to the west selvage, whence I
could again command the...

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...writer; I
had but to say that I was followed, despaired of getting clear, and so
gave...

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...set my friend upon his guard which might prove his mere
salvation. I had adventured other...

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...could stotter on
two feet. I bloodied the nose of one, I mind, when I was...

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...for my Greek and Hebrew; but,
man, I ken that I dinnae ken them--there's the differ...

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...(as I have said) was down; a
strongish wind, carrying a heavy wrack of cloud, had...

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...sticks in my head; I would maybe like it better to stay here
and hing."

"Ay, but...

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...vow whiles that I could hear the squeal of
them! But the great affair is that...

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...Geordie's, we'll
have a dainty meeting of it."

"There's some sense in that," he admitted.

"An advocate, then,...

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...him with in return.

We left Musselburgh before the first ninepenny coach was due from
Edinburgh, for...

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...looking they might have seen
me to start.

"We pit a fomentation to his feet," the goodwife...

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...try and learn to have some kind of
intelligence!"

"I'll try, Alan," said I.

"And now for him...

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...by his marchings
under General Cope; for I can scarce tell what way we went. It...

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...parts of the coast are lonelier. But I mind, as we crawled
upon our bellies into...

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...Then they awoke on
board the _Thistle_, and it seemed they had all in readiness, for...

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...your courage!"

"Alan!" I cried, "what kind of talk is this of it? You're just made...

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...among the bents towards Gillane. It was quite an affair to call
them in and bring...

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...to kidnap,
perhaps to murder me outright. From the position of those engaged, the
first was the...

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...There they sat about their captive in a part of a circle and
gazed upon him...

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...on the south side; at another, as we passed over
some open hills, I spied the...

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...I saw myself hoe tobacco under the
whip's lash. The thought chilled me; the air was...

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...myself, and my three Highlanders (I call them mine,
although it was the other way about),...

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...on religion, leaning more than a little
towards the Cameronian extremes. His morals were of a...

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...of that ship by which I
ever after knew it miles away; and this was a...

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...people seemed to speak
and the things to be done before your face. This gift of...

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...good
side of Andie Dale.

At last, when we two were alone on the summit of the...

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...I would have set hand to
it."

"The Master of Lovat'll be a braw Whig," says I,...

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...but Neil
was the only one who judged he had enough of it for general converse,...

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...me to stop, for it
was not "canny musics."

"Not canny?" I asked. "How can that be?"

"Na,"...

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...rising from the different chalmers--or dungeons, I would raither
say--so that this auld craig in the...

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...the black nails upon the finger-nebs--for he had nae
care of the body. "Fy, fy, poor...

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...word, when Tod Lapraik cam to himsel'.

"Is this you, Tam?" says he. "Haith, man! I'm...

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...stane.

There gaed a cauld stend o' fear into Tam's heart. "This thing is nae
bird," thinks...

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...niether, or ye could spier at
himsel'. Weel, Sandie hailed.

"What's yon on the Bass?" says he.

"On...

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...Sandie a siller tester to pit in his gun wi' the leid
draps, bein' mair deidly...

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...us. It seems they
had fund Lapraik in ane of his dwams, cawing the shuttle and...

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...out, before I knew what I was
doing. His comrades sprang to rescue him, Andie and...

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...but the lap
and bubble of a very quiet sea; and my four companions were all...

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...in slumber; and I would wake again with
a start to darkness of spirit and distress...

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...her domination than I knew. And second, there was
the man's continual policy to be remembered,...

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...added. "Ye see, I was never entirely sure till then,
which way of it ye really...

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...or so much as the protection of a
Bible, no limit can be set; nor had...

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...began already to be weary.

In the press of my hurry, and to be spared the...

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...my tails, and finding a
vacant place hard by, sat down.

"Thirteenthly, my brethren, and in parenthesis,...

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...notes had aroused notice; all who were in the
secret (or supposed themselves to be so)...

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...ding the Camphells yet!" that was still his overcome. And it was
forced home upon my...

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...fash whether material or not--a witness in
this cause, kidnapped by that old, lawless, bandit crew...

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...came presently. Colstoun had wound up one of his speeches with some
expression of their duty...

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...rubbed, what care I?" cries
Stewart, smiting down his fist.

It will be thought I was not...

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...I hung not the least back in this affair while there was life to
be saved;...

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...waive
any right of action; and winding up with a forcible appeal to the King's
mercy on...

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...remember also, if I were you, that you still stand on a very boggy
foundation."

"Not now,...

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...second enclosure I have, and with your permission,
I desire to keep it."

I thought he winced...

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...design to be called to the bar, where your lordship's
countenance would be invaluable; and I...

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...for you,"
says he, dismissing me.

I came away, vastly pleased to have my peace made, yet...

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...want the bluid of, bluid of?

Another went to my old favourite air, _The House of...

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...of pleasure and affairs. I lodged with my lord, with
whom I was encouraged to familiarity;...

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...the one, to whom I had been
presented in Hope Park, was so assured as even...

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...was somewhat the case (no great
while back) with a certain Mr. David Balfour. Should not...

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...pen of my eldest
daughter. 'Here is all the town bizzing with a fine piece of...

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...not this prettily done?" he went on. "Is not this Highland maid
a piece of a...

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...the old ones also. They are all for by-ends, the whole clan of
them! It's this...

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...publicity as a
visitor to Catriona in her prison the world would scarce stint to draw
conclusions,...

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..."I had a good waucht of milk in by
Ratho."

"Aweel, aweel," says Doig. "But ye'll can...

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...she continued, opening the door.

"He has lowpen on his bonny grey,
...

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...inquiries, there was
nothing left me but to return to the Advocate's. I was well received...

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...dear Annie and her two sisters
had to taigle home by theirselves like a string of...

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...in to herself as she sat
waiting. I went to her direct; she rose as I...

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...it was yourself, and I and my two
sisters were the ladies you were so desirous...

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...Grant. "I would not like to
tell you what she said, I find you vain enough...

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...tell," said she.

"Why that?" I asked.

"Well," she said, "I am a good friend, as you...

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...of weight. One way with another, no doubt I was a good deal
improved to look...

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...forth
again his face was dark.

"I think you will soon be the laird indeed, Mr. Davie,"...

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...bosom. This very much affected me.

"I never saw you so well adorned," said I.

"O Davie...

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...news continually by my cousin, Miss Grant, and it is a pleisand
hearing. I am very...

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...to all she liked; chief
among whom was a certain frail old gentlewoman, very blind, and...

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...even if it had been mannerly; it was impossible I should leap from
the window, being...

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...all our
wisdom) till the end of time. And till the end of time, young folk...

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...shall send them, you
can come ashore again and seek Katrine for yourself."

Since I could make...

Page 154

...we had once looked down on Catriona, and all cried
farewell and waved their pocket napkins...

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...of a maid that brought my heart to a stand. I had
scarce the time to...

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...I; it seemed that was the first and last word of my
eloquence.

"You will be glad...

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...other is
the Laird of Prestongrange. Prestongrange will have spoken by himself,
or his daughter in the...

Page 158

...sat there (only now and again walking to
and fro for warmth) from the first blink...

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...at the pains to imagine any further
step; unless perhaps that I would be sometimes tempted...

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...all,
when the red-coat soldiers were out, and my father and my uncles lay in
the hill,...

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...thought I had a friend,
but it proved a disappointment."

She asked me who she was?

"It was...

Page 162

...had come till then so small a share of pleasure in my way that
I might...

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...If I had
kissed her indeed (I thought), perhaps she would have taken it pretty
well; and...

Page 164

...be so unjust then," said I; "nor yet so
ungrateful."

And now it was I that turned...

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...rest of us here to Rotterdam.
Ye can get a passage down the Maes in a...

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...and leaped at the same time into the boat,
which I managed not so elegantly but...

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...began to cry out
with a vast deal of agitation. She had asked of Captain Sang,...

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...in my hands! Suppose your father hindered by an accident,
what would become of you here,...

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...and by whatever mistake, was given the name of
your house for a direction. An error...

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...I stand with
it; and it's clear I'm no very likely to meddle up with the...

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...the great city of Rotterdam. It
was long past dark by then, but the streets pretty...

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...ordinary, calling for Rhenish wine and
drinking of it deep, he soon became unutterably tipsy. In,...

Page 173

...but there is only the one thing certain, that my purse was
gone.

"You will have thought...

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...plain places hereabouts
are very pretty. But our country is the best yet."

"I wish we could...

Page 175

...my help, that she was of the frail sex and
not so much beyond a child,...

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...we came into the
town of Delft. The red gabled houses made a handsome show on...

Page 177

...But the
trouble is how to dispose of you until your father come. I thought last
night...

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...had been startled with a word
of kissing her in Barbara's letter; now that she depended...

Page 179

...place alone. And then, being launched upon
the stream of falsehood, I must do like all...

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...and of houses in the Hollands
architecture and a church spire upon the further side. A...

Page 181

...a long walk alone in which to read
myself a lecture. Here had I taken under...

Page 182

...image of that
figure awaiting me between four walls, my heart beat upon my bosom.

My troubles...

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...me. Indeed it left her wholly solitary,
the more as she was very little of a...

Page 184

...the
which I could almost say (if it may be said with reverence) that I was
crucified.

The...

Page 185

...and this brought me to myself,
so that I began at once to see the folly...

Page 186

...it was the most stupid thing on earth she should not have
perceived my love; and...

Page 187

...note of her voice.

The concern in which I fell instantly on this address, put me...

Page 188

...in a mere whirl like a man drunken. Then I
heard her voice sound very small...

Page 189

...to build on that
surprisal; I must keep her not only clear of reproach, but free...

Page 190

...my shirt and
breeches, I believe I took a leaping step backward like a person shot.

"Ah,"...

Page 191

...avoid joining him.
For however this extraordinary interview might end, it must pass if
possible without waking...

Page 192

...was clean flung away in the midst of Europe,
with scarce two shillings, and not two...

Page 193

...relieved upon this speech and a change in the
man's manner that I spied in him...

Page 194

...by
the coat, "what is it you drink in the morning, whether ale or wine?"

"To be...

Page 195

...the name of Miss Drummond,
and to be thenceforth used with a great deal of distance...

Page 196

...myself
free to prosecute my love with honour. At supper, as at all our meals,
it was...

Page 197

...so much as dream
that Catriona was turned against me; I thought we were like folk
pledged;...

Page 198

...me like this?"

"I do not turn from you at all," she said, speaking very carefully....

Page 199

...farewell after all; I
shall always ken Miss Drummond, but this is a farewell to my...

Page 200

...eyesore to the girl, and a
reminder of a moment's weakness that she now abhorred to...

Page 201

...of our relations; and again break forth in
pitiable regrets for his own land and friends,...

Page 202

...fits of gloom, when I received three letters. The first
was from Alan, offering to visit...

Page 203

...have inquired a little
further into that mention of his birth. Though, they tell me, the...

Page 204

...not see you should be gone beyond the hour," he
added, "and friend David will be...

Page 205

...gentleman of your
condition; either that I should cut your throat or that you should marry
my...

Page 206

...temper.

"So that this is to be the way of it," I concluded. "I will marry...

Page 207

...that he was Catriona's father. But I might have spared
myself alarms. From the poorness of...

Page 208

...saw I must speak soon before my courage
was run out, but where to begin I...

Page 209

...told you to!" she cried. "It is no sense denying it, you said
yourself that there...

Page 210

...say, be sure you have my pity in your difficult
position. But there is just the...

Page 211

...you alone; little I
supposed it would be such a speaking! '_And what if I refuse_?'...

Page 212

...it was all very well for
me to breathe deep; it seemed there was not air...

Page 213

...well,
and we are ashamed of our ingratitude and ill-behaviour. Now we are
wanting to go away...

Page 214

...serve him a small stipend.

He heard the business out with a great deal of eagerness;...

Page 215

...All the heart was gone out of
me, I was weary as though I had run...

Page 216

...her suspicions, and
he was no sooner gone than she had burst the seal. What I...

Page 217

...of yours. The way that you tell it, the
thing's fair impossible. Ye must have made...

Page 218

...James professed to
be in some concern upon his daughter's health, which I believe was never
better;...

Page 219

...so that we were
the last to leave that fortress, and heard the doors of it...

Page 220

...viewing her, "and
so this is the young lady at the last of it! David, you're...

Page 221

...into a young maid's life, and perhaps ding down her gaiety.

But if that was like...

Page 222

...ears, but with the ass quite hidden. It was strange (after
the wind rose, for at...

Page 223

...please excuse him
till about noon. Meanwhile, he carried his daughter aside to the far end
of...

Page 224

...out by a path that led directly seaward, and by which I
followed her. I was...

Page 225

...and I rose to my feet and
stood waiting her in a drunkenness of hope.

I gave...

Page 226

...said.

This was on the summit of a brae; the place was windy and conspicuous,
we were...

Page 227

...sure!"

"And you have but to break the seal!" said she.

"I know it," said I, "but...

Page 228

...should ken her, too," says Alan. "I had fyke enough with her when she
was stationed...

Page 229

...noticed. Then he turned, and we saw he was
a big fellow with a mahogany face.

"I...

Page 230

...rich men," said James.

"Do ye tell me that?" cries Alan.

"I do, sir," said James. "The...

Page 231

...she stood before the man, panting, with big eyes, then swung
suddenly about and faced him.

"Begone!"...

Page 232

...and he may weel be proud of you. If ever I was to
get married, it's...

Page 233

...I perceived that we not only held our advantage
but drew a little away, I began...

Page 234

...for all that,
gentlemen, I cannot see what we would want to make it public for....

Page 235

...quite beyond me, till
at last I considered the date would look best alone.

I thought it...

Page 236

...I determined to do when I began this long story, and that
was to tell out...