Edinburgh: Picturesque Notes

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...Transcribed from the 1903 Seeley & Co. Ltd. edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

Page 1

...the Firth expands into
the German Ocean; and away to the west, over all the carse...

Page 2

...and above all, she
is a curiosity. The Palace of Holyrood has been left aside...

Page 3

...law of the United Kingdom
before two-score boys, and thieves, and hackney-coachmen. Meanwhile
every hour the...

Page 4

...of Art. But Nature is a more
indiscriminate patroness than we imagine, and in no...

Page 5

...plastered like so many swallows' nests
among the buttresses of the old Cathedral, that familiar autocrat,...

Page 6

...its effect
on the new quarters that lie around it, on the sufficiency of its
situation, and...

Page 7

...or fifteen deep in
a vertical direction. The tallest of these _lands_, as they are...

Page 8

...you look up, out
pops the head of a slatternly woman from the countess's window. ...

Page 9

...by
that time into a safe place in life, whence he could pass quietly and
honourably into...

Page 10

...mentioned already how, to the stroller along Princes
Street, the High Street callously exhibits its back...

Page 11

...one roof, destroyed many a home. None who
saw it can have forgotten the aspect...

Page 12

...he wandered down into the land of Thomas the Rhymer, and some
day, when it is...

Page 13

...newspaper; and to judge by their quiet demeanour, you
would think they were waiting for a...

Page 14

...them pause to count the
strokes, and wander on again into the moving High Street, stunned...

Page 15

...to delighted brethren.

Besides the courts, there are installed under the same roof no less than
three...

Page 16

...to the
bottom of the hill and the foundations of the Parliament House; low down,
to be...

Page 17

...the fame of
Deacon Brodie is kept piously fresh. A great man in his day...

Page 18

...adding the terror of man's
justice to the fear of God's visitation. The dead they...

Page 19

...in it, until municipal
improvement levelled the structure to the ground. And my father has
often...

Page 20

...at a word, a look, a visit, or the approach of
death, their hearts would melt...

Page 21

...Christian love.
Shakespeare wrote a comedy of 'Much Ado about Nothing.' The Scottish
nation made a...

Page 22

...the elegance is
not so apparent, the significance remains. You may perhaps look with a
smile...

Page 23

...me; and I was glad to step forward and
raise my eyes to where the Castle...

Page 24

...is a place of many associations. There was one window in a
house at the...

Page 25

...the scaffold or the plantations.
And while the good work was going forward in the Grassmarket,...

Page 26

...City, they
durst not venture, being so light, to go and bury...

Page 27

...them in Black, with four Yards of fine Linen, the
way that...

Page 28

...the dead; and as we look upon
it, a brave influence comes to us from the...

Page 29

... [Picture: The Royal Institution]

It cannot be denied...

Page 30

... It should be a genial and ameliorating influence in life;
it should prompt good thoughts...

Page 31

...a deep valley, among rocks and between
gardens; the crest of either bank is occupied by...

Page 32

...obscure quarters that were neither town nor
country; and I think that both for my companions...

Page 33

... But we have some
possessions that not even the infuriate zeal of builders can utterly
abolish...

Page 34

...the construction of even a very elegant design; and
there is no reason why a chimney...

Page 35

...rock to find
yourself in a field of monuments. Dugald Stewart has the honours of
situation...

Page 36

...gape
at; and a class of men who cannot edit one author without disparaging all
others. ...

Page 37

... Behind and overhead, lie the
Queen's Park, from Muschat's Cairn to Dumbiedykes, St. Margaret's Loch,
and...

Page 38

...Sir Patrick Spens and his Scots
Lords; and yonder smoke on the hither side of Largo...

Page 39

...to
tell the hour; or perhaps a bird goes dipping evenly over the housetops,
like a gull...

Page 40

...swan-song, fitly rounding
in the labours of the day.




CHAPTER IX. WINTER AND NEW YEAR.


The Scotch dialect...

Page 41

...was not choice, so much as an external fate, that kept
Fergusson in this round of...

Page 42

...not depend on
corporal advantages, but support the winter in virtue of a brave and
merry heart....

Page 43

...closed, when singing and even whistling
is banished from our homes and highways, and the oldest...

Page 44

...world is in the street, except
the daintier classes; the sacramental greeting is heard upon all...

Page 45

...swans sailing from the reeds; in winter, a field of ringing
ice. The village church...

Page 46

...before Flodden,
the road descends a long hill, at the bottom of which and just as...

Page 47

...shores they coast.

Below, over a stream, the road passes Bow Bridge, now a dairy-farm, but
once...

Page 48

...world from Feudalism.
Whenever the reigning sovereign passes by, a certain landed proprietor is
held bound to...

Page 49

...ruffling in the breeze. Straight above, the hills
climb a thousand feet into the air....

Page 50

...In the Forty-Five, some
foraging Highlanders from Prince Charlie's army fell upon Swanston in the
dawn. ...

Page 51

...they will only bark and sprawl about you on
the grass, unmindful of their master's excitations.

Kirk...

Page 52

...active and comfortable ways; and you may be never
so laggard and never so unimpressionable, but...

Page 53

...Sons, Tower St. Cambridge Circus, W.C.




Footnotes:


{10} These sentences have, I hear, given offence...