Essays of Travel

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1905 Chatto & Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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... The Second Cabin ...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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... Neither time nor space nor enmity can
conquer old affection; and as I dedicate these...

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...the third aft towards the engines. The starboard
forward gallery is the second cabin. ...

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...patties or rissoles; but as a
general thing mere chicken-bones and flakes of fish, neither hot...

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...asking. Two of my fellow-passengers in the second
cabin had already made the passage by...

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...of eight and nine confronting each other stride-legs,
flushed with jealousy; for to carry home a...

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...I but his messenger who ran his errands and
pleaded privately with the over-modest. I...

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...the deck dissecting our
neighbours in a spirit that was too purely scientific to be called
unkind;...

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...and by the
shipload on their heritage of work; empty continents swarm, as at the
bo's'un's whistle,...

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...another; and though one or two
might still succeed, all had already failed. We were...

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...am here on the chapter of the children, I must mention one
little fellow, whose family...

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...him turn away from a diet which was palatable to myself. Words I
should have...

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...accordion, and the songs
of all nations. Good, bad, or indifferent--Scottish, English, Irish,
Russian, German or...

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...whisky, to the
campaigns in Zululand and Afghanistan.

Every now and again, however, some song that touched...

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...lurch, a different
crop of stars, it seemed as if all this trouble were a thing...

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...slide-door we had a
glimpse of a grey night sea, with patches of phosphorescent foam flying,
swift...

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...more becoming
than a genuine admiration; and it shares this with love, that it does not
become...

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...The yellow flicker of the lantern spun round and
round and tossed the shadows in masses....

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...must have been the riddle that settled us; but the motion and
the close air likewise...

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...published
in the wheel-house, came to be a moment of considerable interest. But
the interest was...

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...but we were all conscious of an
icy influence and a dead break in the course...

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...then he shrugged his shoulders, and said, '_Ach_, _ja_,' with gusto,
like a man who has...

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...a dreary story. He
would bring home three pounds on Saturday, and on Monday all...

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...board with
us, fleeing his disastrous neighbourhood.

Total abstinence, like all ascetical conclusions, is unfriendly to the
most...

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...than
another; for each is but a result and outward sign of a soul tragically
ship-wrecked. ...

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...was almost tedious in the cynical disclosures of his despair.
'The ship may go down for...

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...leisure before they start
upon the search for pleasure; he jibbed and ran away from such
conclusions....

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...the story of his
own brother's deathbed ecstasies. Yet he had somehow failed to fulfil
himself,...

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...his songs attracted the lords
of the saloon, who often leaned to hear him over the...

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...wet
scuppers, and kicking feebly with his outspread toes. We asked him what
was amiss, and...

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...lying bad with cramp, and I can't find
the doctor.'

He turned upon me as pert as...

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...one of the lanterns swinging from his finger. The light,
as it reached the spot,...

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...Jones, and being choked
with indignation, I proceeded to blow off my steam.

'Well,' said I, 'I...

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...an adventure that
required some nerve. The stench was atrocious; each respiration tasted
in the throat...

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...for miles on every hand lee-shores, unbroken,
iron-bound, surf-beat, with only here and there an anchorage...

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...of the masters the better to oppress labouring mankind; and I
confess I was astonished to...

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...if not very fresh, and a plain smoking-cap. His face
was pale, with pale eyes,...

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...would be trouble with the sergeants; but
then the officers were gentlemen, and his own, in...

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...stowaway appears on deck, he has but one thing to pray for: that
he be set...

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...and going home at night to tell his landlady how he had
been seeking for a...

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...another bunk before the
day was older. Shortly before the passengers arrived, the ship was
cursorily...

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...'You leave me alone,'
was his deduction. 'When I get talking to a man, I...

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...angel, but if you
have a hole in your trousers, it is like a millstone round...

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...to me by the hour in ostentatious
idleness; and only if the bo's'un or a mate...

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...emotion, like
a man thinking of his mistress, 'I would give up anything for a lark.'

It...

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...only, and was never refused. Without wishing to explain away the
charity of those who...

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...the opportunity. When alone she seemed preoccupied
and sad; but she was not often alone;...

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...humbler view; for here I was among my own countrymen,
somewhat roughly clad to be sure,...

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...and I wish some one would continue my experiment, and find out
exactly at what stage...

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...knot would
sometimes gather at the door to see my last dispositions for the night.
This was...

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...me immediately on the back of some unpardonable
solecism, which had led him to review my...

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...natural capacities,
and about as wise in deduction, as the bankers and barristers of what is
called...

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...but wished the world made over again in a
crack, so that they might remain improvident...

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...the educated class, did so much
homage to industry as to persuade himself he was industrious....

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...the past, and
his prospect of holidays in the future is both distant and uncertain. ...

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...put to me by a fellow-passenger: 'In America,' said he, 'you get
pies and puddings.' ...

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...inns of the
Cevennes, and that by a learned professor; and when I reached Pradelles
the warning...

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... There was no
picture. The frame surrounded, and the curtain was designed to hide,...

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...families; no charge for storage or
baggage; satisfaction guaranteed to all persons; Michael Mitchell,
Proprietor.' Reunion...

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...of the
American Republic. It seems to them as if, out west, the war of...

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...at which I
should have hesitated; the devil was in it, but Jones and I should...

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...and a pair of
questionable combs. Another Scots lad was here, scrubbing his face with
a...

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...wrote me
down addresses, and came bareheaded into the rain to point me out a
restaurant, where...

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...very little while before; I must allow my recollections to get
thoroughly strained free from all...

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...one small island, so that their intercourse (one
would have thought) must be as close as...

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...grew
weary; and as I was perpetually haunted with the terror of a return of
the tie...

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...unconsciously up
the same, road that I had gone the evening before. When I came...

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...able to look back, in
after years, upon having done so, and get great pleasure from...

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...on the high road,
and sat down to rest myself on a heap of stones at...

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...and asking the bystanders if they saw _him_
coming. At last, when the train was...

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...told the names of all manner of hills and woods and places that I did
not...

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...depravity and vice of the
aristocracy, and when he went on to describe some gilded saloon
experiences,...

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...country are all blotted out from him behind the
confusion of variable effect.

I begin my little...

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...follies and circumscriptions,
and go forward as a new creature into a new world.

It was well,...

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...as I had got by
that time to the top of the ascent, and was now...

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...side with deliberate dignity and
turned-out toes. But a few minutes' converse set my heart...

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...the quiet road. I was now not far from
the end of my day's journey....

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...There he stood, poor rogue, part puzzled,
part angry, part, I believe, amused. He had...

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...was set at
rest; and she told me, very explicitly, to follow the path until I...

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...upon her knee, while an old woman sat placidly
dozing over the fire. You may...

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...easy, even for people who have read Hegel and Dr. M'Cosh,
to decide intelligibly upon the...

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...There was a wonderful sentiment of
distance and atmosphere about the day and the place.

I mounted...

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...One could not help feeling that there ought to be some reason
for this stillness; whether,...

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...the lawn, or perhaps mount for a moment upon the rail, and
there shrilly publish to...

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...and led away a little sect of neighbours to join in
his heresy. It would...

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...early Renaissance,
the pageantries and the light loves of princes, the passion of men for
learning, and...

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...that she was both bewildered and a little contemptuous.
Although she was ready herself to treat...

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...pleasant
graveyard among those great trees of which I have spoken already. The
sky was drowned...

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...and the russet woods, as I
set forth on a dog-cart from Wendover to Tring. ...

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...wood.
Inland, it loses itself, joining, I suppose, the great herd of similar
hills that occupies the...

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...respectability in dress; but there might have been a wife at
home, who had brushed out...

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...all in a fine dull bottle-green and black;
a grave harmonious piece of colouring, with nothing,...

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...remarkable of old for inhumanity.
One of these vaults where the snow had drifted was that...

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...than the high chiefe street, and it
runs from the Kirkland to the Well Trees, in...

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...saw some young fellows about the
smoking-room who seemed, in the eyes of one who cannot...

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...a small
oriel window, fluted and corbelled and carved about with stone heads. It
is so...

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...chimney-stacks, and
their shadows over the white roofs. In the town itself the lit face...

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...with comfort. There is one objection to this device; for, as the
post stands in...

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...has garnered;
and who have now entered into their reward, and enjoy their good things
in their...

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...and Waters, who was a high-born lord, down to the
common sergeant, who was a peasant...

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...household gods, into the wood, whence,
from some high spur, their timid scouts might overlook the...

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...green lane, where the cattle browsed between the doorsteps. As you
go up this street,...

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...man is telling how they all went last year
to the fete at Fleury, and another...

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...among the
birch tufts and the boulders, but ever called together again, as one of
our leaders...

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...wood floor
and bare whitewashed walls, shines all round you in a sort of glory of
reflected...

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...finds a hole in the roof of the
forest, you see a myriad transparent creatures coming...

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...figure they make out there in the sun, like
misbegotten yew-trees! The scene is all...

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...The way lies
through the forest, up hill and down dale, and by beech and pine...

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... '_Il y a de l'eau_,' people have said, with an emphasis, as if
that settled...

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...inspects the
church. And it is not till dinner is on the table, and the...

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...confusion! When we arise next morning,
the grey showers fall steadily, the trees hang limp,...

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...the hillocks, and the race of sign-posts is no more. One
begins to look at...

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...vantage in the system of low hills that
permeates the forest, you will see many different...

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...of resin all around, and
the sound of the axe is rarely still. But strangest...

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...boar is afoot,
and all over the forest, and in all neighbouring villages, there is a
vague...

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...they
ran down, and a growing disquietude as to what might happen next, became
too much for...

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...a weary spirit. Disappointed men, sick Francis Firsts and
vanquished Grand Monarchs, time out of...

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...Alpine glaciers to where Italy
extends her marble moles and glasses her marble palaces in the...

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...seclusion. When
Charles VI. hunted in the time of his wild boyhood near Senlis, there...

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...for the staid
and simple peasant when, with his plough, he upturns old arms and harness
from...

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...off prayers for
the edification of the others at their work. They wear gaudy shawls,
white...

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...apples, to attend mass, and
to visit one of the wine-shops, of which there are no...

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...pines,
and the greater part of the country lies in moorland pasture. The
country is wild...

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...the two cases were
identical. Each apostle based her claim on the superior virtue and
attainments...

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...from America,' he cried, 'six thousand leagues away!'
And the wine-shop audience looked upon it with...

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...serious air. The stripling girl would sometimes
laugh at me in a provocative and not...

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...had a right to be
angry; for here was her son, a hulking fellow, visibly the...

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...the borders of Ardeche, I began an improving
acquaintance with the foreman road-mender. He was...

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...given up the information in
despair. A tale of old lawlessness may yet be read...

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...exceedingly, so that I must
have been taught the love of beautiful sounds before I was...

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...shepherd's staff, such as
cheers the heart of the cockney tourist, on the other a rod...

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...scarce conscious
joy in childhood, in age a companion thought:--

'In pastures green...

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...of age;
it is even a kind of second weaning. In the past all was...

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...perhaps been conscious of some inconsiderable measure of
disappointment, that it was only Tom Pinch who...

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...I was reading; and years elapsed before I consciously met
Diana and her father among the...

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...things are necessary in any neighbourhood where we propose to spend a
life: a desert and...

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...rock on a calm day is a
better station than the top of Teneriffe or Chimborazo....

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...the eyes will
take care of themselves. Nor must the ear be forgotten: without birds...

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...wall with a
divan: for a day spent upon a divan, among a world of cushions,...

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...corner for photography, while at the far end a space is kept
clear for playing soldiers....

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...no
cross-cuts over the field, no following of streams, no unguided rambles
in the wood. His...

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...by single
people walking rapidly with plaids about their shoulders, by sudden
troops of German boys trying...

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...territory--Lapland, Labrador, or
Alaska.

Or, possibly, you arise very early in the morning; totter down stairs in
a...

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...appreciations. The invalid is now
asked to lodge on wintry Alps; a ruder air shall...

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...for that, he looked for it, and he throws it from him
with the thought.

A long...

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...which are black with pine trees, bear it no relation,
and might be in another sphere....

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...lack of diversion in an Alpine sanitarium. The place is
half English, to be sure,...

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...man at
the touch of the true virtuoso. Even that you may perhaps enjoy; and...

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...you may have moments almost too
appalling to be called enjoyment; the head goes, the world...

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...looking for the invalids, and he would lose his pains,
for not one out of five...

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...at morning with the lark, that is not precisely a
song-bird's heart that you bring back...

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...is as good as a meal to them; and the turn of a
phrase goes further...

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...upon
the Alps is a sort of intermittent youth, with periods of lassitude. The
fountain of...

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...is no youngling
enthusiasm on hilltops that can possess itself of the last essence of
beauty. ...

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...a hill and shining in the afternoon
sun, he will find it an object so changeful...

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...here no saving imperfection,
none of those secondary curves and little trepidations of direction that
carry, in...

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...that we have seen
from miles back, upon an eminence, is so long hid from us,...

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...town-life in the language of the long, solitary country highways. A
meeting of one with...

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...the body and already plunge
into the shadow of the woods, and overlook from the hill-top...

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...a note of the chord, and make
discord or harmony almost at will. There is...

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...ignore them,
and put our head among the grass for flowers, or pore, for long times
together,...

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...were
only accompanied, as you went doggedly forward, by the gaunt
telegraph-posts and the hum of the...

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...what I mean; he must remember how,
when he has sat himself down behind a dyke...

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...pleasure was to be out of the wind, and to keep it in memory all...

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...at heart of the insane strife of the pigmies
who had erected these two castles and...

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...here. For all I know, they may serve to
complete the impression in the mind...