Island Nights' Entertainments

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1905 Chatto and Windus Edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





Island Nights’ Entertainments


Contents:

The Beach...

Page 1

...die of?” I inquired.

“Some kind of sickness,” says the captain. “It appears it took...

Page 2

...no other whites upon my
island, and when I sailed to the next, rough customers made...

Page 3

...I thought Falesá seemed to be the right kind of a place; and
the more I...

Page 4

...in the beam; and I was just
thinking so when Case touched me.

“That’s pretty,” says he.

I...

Page 5

...is a Chinese! a strange idea,
but common in the islands. It was a board...

Page 6

...negro were parasites; they crawled and fed upon him like the flies,
he none the wiser....

Page 7

...to-day, for the
marriage. ’s Uma’s mother.”

“Well, suppose it is; what’s she carrying on about?”...

Page 8

...house and before that
grinning negro. I thought shame, I say; for the mountebank was...

Page 9

...he said,
could show me to my house, and the three bade us farewell indoors.

The night...

Page 10

...as jewels, only
larger—it came over me she was a kind of countess really, dressed to...

Page 11

...would never let on to weakness with a native, and I had nothing for
it but...

Page 12

...going up in a Christian manner;
all was shipshape and Bristol fashion. To be sure,...

Page 13

...there might be
an army at his elbow. What scares him worst is to be...

Page 14

...salary and profit, and I could have kicked myself all round the
village to have been...

Page 15

...you could have written with him on a piece
of paper.

“Good day, sir,” said I.

He answered...

Page 16

...the French quirk, which was another reason
we had for thinking him above the common.

“Yes, I...

Page 17

...what would you have? Johnny had slipped his cable; no more
Johnny in the market;...

Page 18

...with no more words. I thought this
seemed unlike a native, and a native woman,...

Page 19

...So I held my tongue, and thought all the more; and the more I
thought, the...

Page 20

...to think. Understand me, Wiltshire; I don’t count
this your quarrel,” he went on, with...

Page 21

...Kanakas are.”

“Well, they don’t get much _bonjour_ out of me,” said I. “You tell...

Page 22

...he had the brains to run a parliament.

“Well, is that all?” I asked, when a...

Page 23

...he was ashamed to tell the truth,” says Case; “I
guess he thought it silly. ...

Page 24

...poor Kanakas take back their laws, and take up
their taboos, and that, whenever it happens...

Page 25

...if I ain’t tabooed, what makes
the folks afraid of me?”

She stood and looked at me...

Page 26

... It’s strange how it hits a man when he’s in
love; for there’s no use...

Page 27

...was out, and
gone stone-cold; but we fired up after a while, and cooked each a...

Page 28

...but I was just as glad he had
kept Uma clear of Apia and Papeete and...

Page 29

...of it beyond guessing. It was some _tala pepelo_, Uma said,
some lie, some calumny;...

Page 30

...astern; a native pastor crouched on the wedge of the poop,
steering; some four-and-twenty paddles flashing...

Page 31

...the blood poured on his pyjamas.

“I’ve had enough for this time,” says he, and he...

Page 32

...want two services, in fact; and, if you care to give me them,
I’ll perhaps take...

Page 33

... I couldn’t see where she put it the first time, I couldn’t see now
where...

Page 34

...and sang out.

“You haven’t made much of a Christian of this one,” says I to...

Page 35

...be persuaded he was a man of extraordinary parts. All our islanders
easily acquire a...

Page 36

...an influence upon my
pastors. And, besides, there had been some flying talk in the...

Page 37

...And now I was informed
that he had fallen in a sort of dependence upon Case....

Page 38

...prove worse; and a scandal is, at
the best, a thing to be avoided when humanly...

Page 39

...I might have paid the fellow out with
his own coin. But there I was;...

Page 40

...Catholic interest; they are a wretchedly small body, but they
count two chiefs. And then...

Page 41

...speak to
gen’le’um.”

“I know,” says I, “but it happens I was addressing myself to you, Mr.
Black...

Page 42

...neither house, nor man, nor planted
fruit-tree; and the reef being mostly absent, and the shores...

Page 43

...to Falesá. He was in deep thought, and the
birds seemed to know it, trotting...

Page 44

...glorifying.”

At this Uma fell in a terrible taking; if I went in the high bush...

Page 45

...over to spirits and devils and the dead, and there were no
living folk nearer than...

Page 46

...same night the five
young gentlemen sickened, and spoke never a reasonable word until they
died.

“And do...

Page 47

...knife, I set off upon a voyage of discovery. I made, as near as...

Page 48

...a thing that’s natural
in the bush, and that’s the end of it.

As I got near...

Page 49

...blowing by
and the leaves closing. I tell you the truth: I had made up...

Page 50

...they were just big weeds,
and sappy to cut through like carrot. From all this...

Page 51

...you (what made the thing more curious) that all the
time the Tyrolean harps were harping...

Page 52

...the next moment I had my idea.

I went back by the path, which, when once...

Page 53

...and I mean to show you that
you’ve met your match.”

“This is a silly way to...

Page 54

...if his pipe is broke—but a cigar, and one of my Mexicans at
that, that I...

Page 55

...my talk with Case on
the beach, I thought it might very well cost me my...

Page 56

...sir,” says I, “no such foolishness. I’ve come here to trade, tell
him, and not...

Page 57

...Round the village, what with
the lights and the fires in the open houses, and the...

Page 58

...it easier.
The fearsomeness of the wood had been a good bit rubbed off for me...

Page 59

...only living creature this side of Cape Horn. Well, as I stood
there thinking, it...

Page 60

...of precious time, afraid to call out lest
Case was at the heels of her, and...

Page 61

...position, which left me no retreat, but I was afraid to change. Then
I saw...

Page 62

...bounded over the edge of the hill, and went pounding
down into the next valley. ...

Page 63

...whether I was hurt or not, but turned
right over on my face to crawl after...

Page 64

...I. “If you had the wit of a louse you would be
praying!”

I was all...

Page 65

...but it did him no harm and did me good.

“I bet you’re dead now,” I...

Page 66

...east came orange, the whole wood began to whirr with singing
like a musical box, and...

Page 67

...a station on the
Papa-malulu side; did very bad business, for the truth is neither of...

Page 68

...a
powerful big woman now, and could throw a London bobby over her shoulder.
But that’s natural...

Page 69

...of
money, viewing the great houses upon either hand with pleasure, “What
fine houses these are!” he...

Page 70

...a round-bellied bottle with
a long neck; the glass of it was white like milk, with...

Page 71

...and finish your life in comfort.”

“Well, I observe two things,” said Keawe. “All the...

Page 72

...to you, my fine fellow, and the devil go with you
for me!” said the man.

“Hold...

Page 73

...it was a curious
bottle—such glass was never blown in any human glassworks, so prettily
the colours...

Page 74

...you have not heard,” said the friend, “your uncle—that
good old man—is dead, and your cousin—that...

Page 75

...wished, and how he would have that
house furnished, and about the pictures on the wall...

Page 76

...of the most beautiful women, and
of singular places; nowhere in the world are there pictures...

Page 77

...of my word,” said Lopaka. “And here is the money betwixt
us.”

“Very well,” replied Keawe....

Page 78

...and all the time he trembled and clasped his hands, and
prayed for his friend, and...

Page 79

...you?”

“I will tell you who I am in a little,” said Keawe, dismounting from his
horse,...

Page 80

...at once.”

“No,” said Kokua; but this time she did not laugh, nor did Keawe ask...

Page 81

...undressed for his bath, he spied
upon his flesh a patch like a patch of lichen...

Page 82

...thought ice
ran in his veins.

“A dreadful thing is the bottle,” thought Keawe, “and dreadful is...

Page 83

...lit up, and the Haoles sat
and played at the cards and drank whiskey as their...

Page 84

...Haole in Beritania
Street. When he came to the door, about the hour of the...

Page 85

...“you would risk your soul upon so desperate
an adventure, and to avoid the proper punishment...

Page 86

...she was so fashioned
from the hair upon her head to the nails upon her toes...

Page 87

...pity poor Keawe; then
you will understand how much he loved you in the past—that he...

Page 88

...packed it with the richest of their clothes and the
bravest of the knick-knacks in the...

Page 89

...freedom of speech, began to push the bottle. You
are to consider it was not...

Page 90

...moaned.

It was Kokua’s first thought to run forward and console him; her second
potently withheld her....

Page 91

...she, “I am his wife, whom he bought with his soul’s
welfare. And what should...

Page 92

...walked off along the avenue, she cared not whither. For all
roads were now the...

Page 93

...said he, and shuddered. “It is
true I bought it myself at a cent, when...

Page 94

...deeper.

Now there was an old brutal Haole drinking with him, one that had been a
boatswain...

Page 95

...sat in
a chair and started up like one awakened out of sleep.

“I have been drinking...

Page 96

...wife
in the house, and offer her these for the bottle, which (if I am not...

Page 97

...I’m going anyway,” returned the sailor; “and this bottle’s the
best thing to go with I’ve...

Page 98

...as Kalamake, that can see across
to-morrow,” was a byword in the islands.

Of all these doings...

Page 99

...into the parlour, which was a very fine room,
papered and hung with prints, and furnished...

Page 100

...came to himself the first, because he
was the younger. “The pang of it was...

Page 101

...day,” said he. “You need not be so frightened; I will not eat
you.” ...

Page 102

...sun and the sea, and
they stood once more in the dimness of the shuttered parlour,...

Page 103

...afraid of Kalamake, but he was vain too; and these
words of his wife’s incensed him.

“Very...

Page 104

...the waves. The
wizard had a lantern, which he lit and held with his finger...

Page 105

...I had better get out of this paltry boat, for my bulk
swells to a very...

Page 106

...her, and the next moment was buried in the rushing seas, and the next
hauled on...

Page 107

...sea. The captain and the mate
looked at it with the night glass, and named...

Page 108

...and Keola had his sailor’s knife, so
he had no fear of sharks. A little...

Page 109

...that after all we may have
sailed in a circle, and I may be quite near...

Page 110

...palace in Honolulu, and how he was a
chief friend of the king and the missionaries....

Page 111

...if let
alone. Only once a chief had cast a spear at one of the...

Page 112

...again in safety.”

The soul of Keola died within him.

“What is this?” he cried. “I...

Page 113

...They think you are fallen sick and must lose flesh.”

With that Keola got to his...

Page 114

...said he.

And at last, he knew not very well how or when, sleep feel on...

Page 115

...cry.

Have you seen a child when he is all alone and has a wooden sword,...

Page 116

...his wife at last he was mighty pleased, and he
was mighty pleased to be home...

Page 117

...Whites....