Kidnapped

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...KIDNAPPED
BEING
MEMOIRS OF THE ADVENTURES OF
...

Page 1

... THE
TRIAL
OF
...

Page 2

...thirty-five years, married, witness cited,
sworn, purged and examined ut supra, depones, That, in the month...

Page 3

...instantly incorporated into Kidnapped.

F. V. DE G. S.




DEDICATION

MY DEAR CHARLES BAXTER:


If you ever read this...

Page 4

...its beer, sitting in
the seats of Burns and his companions. I think I see you,...

Page 5

... TALK WITH ALAN IN THE WOOD OF LETTERMORE
...

Page 6

...a good place
indeed, and I have been very happy there; but then I have never...

Page 7

...I stammered, "and if you were in my shoes, would you
go?"

"Of a surety," said the...

Page 8

...father's books and plenishing, which I have bought (as I have
explained from the first) in...

Page 9

...LILLY OF THE VALLEY WATER.--Take the flowers of lilly of the
valley and distil them in...

Page 10

...house of Shaws. It was a
word that seemed to surprise those of whom I sought...

Page 11

...that his ill-fame should be thus current on the
wayside? If an hour's walking would have...

Page 12

...sky; and every sign of a kind soil and climate; and yet the
barrack in the...

Page 13

...see it in the dim light, was a great piece
of wood all studded with nails;...

Page 14

...the kitchen and touch naething," said the voice; and while the
person of the house set...

Page 15

...appetite for meat as ever a
young man had.

Meanwhile, my uncle, stooping over the fire, turned...

Page 16

...young. He'll never have spoken muckle
of me?"

"I never knew, sir, till you told it me...

Page 17

...the mice and spiders
had done their worst since then. Many of the window-panes, besides, were
broken;...

Page 18

...him, I did not wish
him to suppose me helpless.

He seemed to turn this over in...

Page 19

...Dod, David, I'll have her roasted on red
peats before I'm by with it! A witch--a...

Page 20

...helped by my own blood
than strangers; and if we don't agree, I'll do my best...

Page 21

...time straight into my eyes:
his own were little and light, and bright like a bird's,...

Page 22

...by now to be a matter of just
precisely--just exactly"--and here he paused and stumbled--"of just
exactly...

Page 23

...see here," says he, "tit for tat."

I told him I was ready to prove my...

Page 24

...not counting
lofts. Well, as I advanced, it seemed to me the stair grew airier and...

Page 25

...followed; and
before I had reached the ground level it fell in buckets. I put out...

Page 26

...waistcoat, and turned to my uncle.

He lay as he had fallen, all huddled, with one...

Page 27

...peep or the last of the stars had
vanished, I made my way to the side...

Page 28

...saw by his face that he had
no lie ready for me, though he was hard...

Page 29

...some
losses follow. I have drawn a bill upon you, as per margin, and am, sir,
...

Page 30

...he had followed the sea since he was nine, but could
not say how old he...

Page 31

...I, "can you find no reputable life on shore?"

"O, no," says he, winking and looking...

Page 32

...the boat had just gone
north with passengers. A skiff, however, lay beside the pier, with...

Page 33

...same with most men that have been
carbonadoed, as they call it, in the tropic seas."

"Well,...

Page 34

...presently we were
set down at a table in the front room of the inn, and...

Page 35

...thousand others, crowded into
my mind, as I sat staring before me out of the inn...

Page 36

...time we were at the boat-side, and he was handing me in. I did
not dream...

Page 37

...up, and now rushed giddily downward; and so sick and
hurt was I in body, and...

Page 38

...and my visitor then felt my pulse and temples, and
set himself to wash and dress...

Page 39

...am, and none too
much, to be the second officer of this old tub, and you...

Page 40

...the men brought me a drink of something healing which Mr. Riach
had prepared, and bade...

Page 41

...was about a third short, I was
very glad to get it, and hoped great good...

Page 42

...had been
recently hurt, he would weep bitterly and swear to run away; but if
he was...

Page 43

...Look at me: I'm a laird's
son and more than half a doctor, and here I...

Page 44

...and pushed on across the decks,
running between the seas, catching at ropes, and only saved...

Page 45

...it away from him, rather by surprise
than violence, crying out, with an oath, that there...

Page 46

...the aftermost end of the round-house, and
right in the draught of the two doors. It...

Page 47

...their pickles, which were the great dainty, I was allowed my share
of; and had I...

Page 48

...I was serving Mr. Riach and the captain at
their supper, when the ship struck something...

Page 49

...boats."

"Friends of yours?" said Hoseason.

"You have none such friends in your country," was the reply....

Page 50

...he observed me standing in my corner, and packed
me off to the galley to get...

Page 51

...(so soon after the forty-five) there were many exiled
gentlemen coming back at the peril of...

Page 52

...talk, one upon each side,
and pin him by the two arms; or if that'll not...

Page 53

...into the round-house and saw the Jacobite eating his supper
under the lamp; and at that...

Page 54

...part of my enemies will be
in front of me, where I would aye wish to...

Page 55

...if they lift hand against the door, ye're to shoot. But
that's not all. Let's make...

Page 56

...that, silence again.

I do not know if I was what you call afraid; but my...

Page 57

...his hands
and knees; the blood was pouring from his mouth, and he was sinking
slowly lower,...

Page 58

...them made one rush of it, cutlass in hand, against the door;
and at the same...

Page 59

...chases sheep.

Yet he was no sooner out than he was back again, being as cautious...

Page 60

...the two that
came by the skylight. Four more were hurt, and of that number, one...

Page 61

...great number of gulls that went crying and fishing round
the ship, that she must have...

Page 62

...when I saw what care he took to pluck out the threads
where the button had...

Page 63

...me?"

"Captain," says Alan, "I doubt your word is a breakable. Last night ye
haggled and argle-bargled...

Page 64

...we lie, we are but a few hours' sail from
Ardnamurchan," said Hoseason. "Give me sixty,...

Page 65

...or between that and Isle
Eriska in the chain of the Long Island. Now to get...

Page 66

...of us by treachery--but never with the sword," he cried loudly,
and with the word brought...

Page 67

...am willing to prove with either sword
or pistol. And that was the father that I...

Page 68

...the bairns forby, the children and the hope of
Appin, that must be learned their letters...

Page 69

...clansmen, that had borne arms for thirty centuries; ay, and the very
clothes off their backs--so...

Page 70

...there
was a Stewart to be starved and a red-headed hound of a Campbell to be
pleasured!"

"Well,...

Page 71

...gang hame singing to Glenure!"

"Let me have a word," said I. "Be sure, if they...

Page 72

...music, but principally pipe-music; was a
well-considered poet in his own tongue; had read several books...

Page 73

...low sound of roaring.

"What do ye call that?" asked the captain, gloomily.

"The sea breaking on...

Page 74

...soon; for one reef was
so close on the brig's weather board that when a sea...

Page 75

...southwest end of Mull, off a little isle they call Earraid,
which lay low and black...

Page 76

...drank my fill, and then came up, and got a blink of the
moon, and then...

Page 77

...of a sandy bay
surrounded by low hills.

The sea was here quite quiet; there was no...

Page 78

...creek or inlet of the sea, which
seemed to run pretty deep into the land; and...

Page 79

...the little waves splashed into my face.
But at that depth my feet began to leave...

Page 80

...and the gulls
which haunted the outlying rocks in a prodigious number. But the creek,
or strait,...

Page 81

...houses. But the second day passed;
and though as long as the light lasted I kept...

Page 82

...pitiful. My clothes were beginning to
rot; my stockings in particular were quite worn through, so...

Page 83

...face in the earth. If a wish would kill men,
those two fishers would never have...

Page 84

...my mouth was so dry, I must wet it with the sea-water before I
was able...

Page 85

...me in the bay, and even watched for the ebbs, the better to get
my shellfish--even...

Page 86

...way
under his great-coat. This set me smiling, partly because my friend was
safe, partly to think...

Page 87

...the variety of their array. Some went bare, only for a
hanging cloak or great-coat, and...

Page 88

...but I might
have spared myself the pain; for my host was no robber, only miserably
poor...

Page 89

...shillings mair," said he, "and hersel' will bring ye there."

I reflected awhile and then offered...

Page 90

...out so loud that I made up my mind I should say
nothing of the other...

Page 91

...grew angrier and angrier,
and at last began to swear in Gaelic and to strike for...

Page 92

...of murder."

"The cream of it is," says I, "that he called himself a catechist."

"And why...

Page 93

...her decks, but the sea-beach also, were quite
black with people, and skiffs were continually plying...

Page 94

...see that ye come safe. But
if ye will pardon me to speak plainly," says he,...

Page 95

...in those days;
yet it was a wonder to myself, when I had to go from...

Page 96

..."It's wonderful," said he, "where the
tenants find the money, for their life is mere starvation....

Page 97

...and forth, as folk say.
First, James of the Glens rode to Edinburgh, and got some...

Page 98

...Mr. Henderland's dwelling, than to
my great surprise (for I was now used to the politeness...

Page 99

...sea was here very deep and still,
and had scarce a wave upon it; so that...

Page 100

...the south
country direct, by my own guidance and at my own charges, and what Mr.
Campbell...

Page 101

...in the rear.

"And what seek ye in Aucharn?" said Colin Roy Campbell of Glenure, him
they...

Page 102

...sheriff's officer had run back at the
first sound of the shot, to hasten the coming...

Page 103

...here among the trees," said a voice close by.

* Duck.

Indeed,...

Page 104

...my only friend in that wild country was
blood-guilty in the first degree; I held him...

Page 105

...very much alike."

* Bag.

"Do you mean you had no hand...

Page 106

...in any
little difficulty, should be very mindful of the case of them that have.
And that...

Page 107

...appear. Still, I cried
out that he was unjust to the Duke of Argyle, who (for...

Page 108

...the waters of the loch. It was a rough
part, all hanging stone, and heather, and...

Page 109

...the
pouring of a mill-dam.

It took the colour out of Alan's face, even to tell what...

Page 110

...But how did Hoseason take it?"

"It sticks in my mind that he would take it...

Page 111

...I dare say he'll
have a sentry on the road, and he would ken well enough...

Page 112

...panic; and though none spoke above his breath, their speech sounded
both anxious and angry.

It was...

Page 113

...her face and sobbing out louder than
before.

* Mad.

This was all...

Page 114

...Alan; "and my friend from the
Lowlands here" (nodding at me) "gave me a good word...

Page 115

...sir," says Alan, turning to me, "what say ye to that? Ye are here
under the...

Page 116

...stood abashed.

"Hoot, hoot," said Alan, looking mighty silly. "The day comes unco soon
in this month...

Page 117

...to watch."

And with that he ran harder than ever down to the water-side, in a...

Page 118

...for his life, and I must
stagger to my feet and run after him. I had...

Page 119

...of a man. And then there was water there,
and water's a thing that dauntons even...

Page 120

...a sentry, with
the sun sparkling on his arms. All the way down along the river-side
were...

Page 121

...earth, and got some relief by bathing our breasts and temples.

The soldiers kept stirring all...

Page 122

...the edge and
dropped on the ground on the shadowy side.

I followed him at once, and...

Page 123

...this we cast ourselves on the ground and plunged
head and shoulders in the water; and...

Page 124

...the midst, and upon the one hand a shallow cave
in a rock. Birches grew there...

Page 125

...it was but to stand on guard with an assured countenance,
which is often all that...

Page 126

...friend of mine, John Breck Maccoll,
a bouman* of Appin's."

*A bouman...

Page 127

...had
barked and the folk run out from their houses; and he thought he had
heard a...

Page 128

...answered; and presently the
bouman came up the water-side, looking for us, right and left. He...

Page 129

...back to France in a bonnet!"

This put a second reflection in my mind: that if...

Page 130

...to Alan.

"Well, and it is a good thing for the honour of the Maccolls," said
Alan,...

Page 131

...would
soon ride you down. It's no good place, David; and I'm free to say, it's
worse...

Page 132

...of heath in the ground to serve instead; so that as soon
as the shadow of...

Page 133

...scathed with fire; and there rose in our faces (which were
close to the ground) a...

Page 134

...what we've gained? Na, na, when the day
comes, it shall find you and me in...

Page 135

...that time we were
past the greatest danger, and could walk upon our feet like men,...

Page 136

...half wakened me.

"What," I cried, "is Cluny still here?"

"Ay, is he so!" said Alan. "Still...

Page 137

...dare say it
was slowly enough in truth), through a labyrinth of dreary glens and
hollows and...

Page 138

...Mr. Stewart, come awa', sir!" said he, "and bring in your friend
that as yet I...

Page 139

...the country, of which he was immoderately greedy. There
was no end to his questions; he...

Page 140

...the son of a race of polite kings, but not
so wise as Solomon. I gathered,...

Page 141

...father."

"Say nae mair, say nae mair," said Cluny, and pointed me to a bed of
heather...

Page 142

...Cage, and this dazzled and offended
me. Cluny sat at the table, biting the pack of...

Page 143

...with a groan. "Ye shouldnae have given it
me. I'm daft when I get to the...

Page 144

...But I am
still waiting your opinion."

I am sure if ever Cluny hated any man it...

Page 145

...friendship
is a burden; go, take your risks and bear your hardships alone----" no,
that was impossible;...

Page 146

...never yet failed a friend, and
it's not likely I'll begin with you. There are things...

Page 147

...But the gillie, who was indeed the chief man of Cluny's scouts,
had good reasons to...

Page 148

...springs of the mountain were broken up; every glen
gushed water like a cistern; every stream...

Page 149

...me upon one side with a provoking smile.

The third night we were to pass through...

Page 150

...but I
was afoot so briskly, and set off again with such a natural manner,
that he...

Page 151

...it seems a poor
kind of pleasure to out-face a boy. Both the Campbells and the...

Page 152

...had no need to pretend; whether I
chose or not, I spoke in a weeping voice...

Page 153

...precisely what I thought
I liked about ye, was that ye never quarrelled:--and now I like...

Page 154

...a festival, and we commonly
turned night into day.

The soldiers let us be; although once a...

Page 155

...Alan's coming; the two were little likely to agree; and yet if
we sent word or...

Page 156

...was under the lash of the law (and was indeed hanged some three
years later) should...

Page 157

...Have ye
music, as folk say? Are ye a bit of a piper?"

...

Page 158

...a very creditable piper for a Stewart. Hand me the pipes." Alan
did as he asked;...

Page 159

...an ebb that we must think first of all on speed;
for if we came not...

Page 160

...keep silent. But the sand of the little isle
was sun-warm, the green plants gave us...

Page 161

...doing; and indeed I was so sharply cut by the disappointment,
that I was little likely...

Page 162

...Ochil mountains; and by Alloa and Clackmannan and
Culross, all of which we avoided: and about...

Page 163

...with ye, I want her to be sorry for ye, David; to which end
there is...

Page 164

...would be better riding," says she.

"And where could I get a horse to him?" cried...

Page 165

...dudgeon at being called a Jacobite and treated
like a child.

"Alan," I cried, "I can stand...

Page 166

...when
the wind gowls in the chimney and the rain tirls on the roof? Are ye...

Page 167

...of persons, from the Lord President of the
Court of Session, who had denied him justice,...

Page 168

...our situation.




CHAPTER XXVII

I COME TO MR. RANKEILLOR

The next day it was agreed that Alan should...

Page 169

...of me I could not muster up the courage to address any of
these reputable burghers;...

Page 170

...cried out to some one whom I could not see
that he would be engaged all...

Page 171

...than me in the geography. But so
far, I may tell you, this agrees pretty exactly...

Page 172

...had given you considerable sums; and that you had
started for the continent of Europe, intending...

Page 173

...name of Alan had of
course rung through Scotland, with the news of the Appin murder...

Page 174

...trifle
bloody-minded. It would please me none the worse, if (with all his
merits) he were soused...

Page 175

...more, not always ugly. He had a fine,
gallant air; people stood in their doors to...

Page 176

...to concession on your father's part, and from one height
to another of squalling, sentimental selfishness...

Page 177

...Shaws where he has
taken root for a quarter of a century, and contenting yourself in...

Page 178

...now forgotten.
Then he got a sheet of paper and a pencil, and set to work...

Page 179

...through these
hardships and fearful perils without scath. My only thought should have
been of gratitude; and...

Page 180

...to my friend, Mr. Thomson.

"Mr. Thomson, I am pleased to meet you," said he. "But...

Page 181

...was, he would see Alan
standing, like a dark shadow, on the steps; the three witnesses...

Page 182

...be sure."

"Na," says my uncle, "but this is no a very chanty kind of a...

Page 183

...way," says Alan. "My friends would doubtless keep your
nephew as long as there was any...

Page 184

...language!"

"Killed or kept!" repeated Alan.

"O, keepit, keepit!" wailed my uncle. "We'll have nae bloodshed, if...

Page 185

..."It's a braw nicht, Mr. Balfour," added Torrance.

Never a word said my uncle, neither black...

Page 186

...period they had come to a good understanding, and my uncle and
I set our hands...

Page 187

...tried
for your life before a Highland jury, on a Highland quarrel and with
a Highland Judge...

Page 188

...be discreet; and in all these matters, may the
Lord guide you, Mr. David!"

Thereupon he took...

Page 189

...starve in the meanwhile; and then we
stood a space, and looked over at Edinburgh in...