Kidnapped (Illustrated) Being Memoirs of the Adventures of David Balfour in the Year 1751

By Robert Louis

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...KIDNAPPED




...

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... WRITTEN BY HIMSELF

...

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...to crack. But if you
tried me on the point of Alan’s guilt or innocence, I...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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...of far voyages and foreign places

THE SIEGE OF THE ROUND-HOUSE ...

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... ...

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...where I was
going I would go with a good will.”

“Ay?” said Mr. Campbell. “Very well,...

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...cannot but suppose them to be somewhat of your
blood) should put you to the door,...

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...off-go; but, O Davie, laddie,
it’s but a drop of water in the sea; it’ll help...

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... palsey. It is good against the Gout; it comforts the heart and
...

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...Shaws. It was a
word that seemed to surprise those of whom I sought my way....

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...his ill-fame should be thus current on the
wayside? If an hour’s walking would have brought...

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...and every sign of a kind soil and climate; and yet
the barrack in the midst...

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...it in the dim light, was a great piece
of wood all studded with nails; and...

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...kitchen and touch naething,” said the voice; and while the
person of the house set himself...

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...meat as ever a
young man had.

Meanwhile, my uncle, stooping over the fire, turned the letter...

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...was a secret man, Alexander--a secret, silent man,” he continued.
“He never said muckle when he...

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...man could wish; but damp, dirt, disuse, and the mice and spiders
had done their worst...

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...my position, and finding myself all alone with him, I did not wish
him to suppose...

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...fifteen--that’s every day
since I had the limmer rowpit![3] Dod, David, I’ll have her roasted on
red...

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...be helped by my own blood
than strangers; and if we don’t agree, I’ll do my...

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...straight into my eyes: his
own were little and light, and bright like a bird’s, blinking...

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...now to be a matter of just
precisely--just exactly”--and here he paused and stumbled--“of just
exactly forty...

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...here,” says he, “tit for tat.”

I told him I was ready to prove my gratitude...

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...counting
lofts. Well, as I advanced, it seemed to me the stair grew airier and a
thought...

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...and
before I had reached the ground level it fell in buckets. I put out my
head...

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...and turned to my uncle.

He lay as he had fallen, all huddled, with one knee...

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...or the last of the stars had
vanished, I made my way to the side of...

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...by his face that he had
no lie ready for me, though he was hard at...

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...any further commands for over-seas, to-day
will be the last occasion,...

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...buckled an old rusty cutlass on;
and then we trod the fire out, locked the door,...

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...See ’ere,” and he showed me a great case-knife, which he told me
was stolen. “O,”...

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...of Forth (as is very well known) narrows at
this point to the width of a...

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...bench, look cooler, or
more studious and self-possessed, than this ship-captain.

He got to his feet at...

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...the ebb set, and expressed his gladness to be out of a
port where there were...

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...I ken,” said he.

“Ay, man?” said I. “Is that so? Was my--was Alexander the eldest...

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...at the town pier, and that’s but a penny stonecast from
Rankeillor’s house.” And here he...

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...and my
uncle turned round where he was sitting, and showed me a face full of
cruelty...

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...measure of time; day and night were alike in that ill-smelling
cavern of the ship’s bowels...

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...that means.”

“I am no conjurer, Mr. Riach,” said the captain.

“Give me leave, sir,” said Riach;...

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...on some
sea-blankets; where the first thing that I did was to lose my senses.

It was...

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...it is
years ago now: but I have never forgotten him. His wife (who was “young
by...

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...strange notion of the dry land, picked up from
sailor’s stories: that it was a place...

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...would do his best to help me;
that I should have paper, pen, and ink, and...

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...see the sunset still quite bright.
This, at such an hour of the night, surprised me...

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...he?” He shook his head like one that does not know
and does not wish to...

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...who had been lying and whimpering in his berth, raised himself
upon his elbow and looked...

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...boy?” he asked again; and when I had answered him,
“Ah!” says he, “I thought that,”...

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...followed on that a council
of the officers, and some decision which I did not rightly...

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...but rather of the man’s
clothes than his person. And to be sure, as soon as...

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...any of the red-coated gentry, it’s like it would
go hard with me. Now, sir, I...

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...Hoseason; and then, “if they knew,” he
added, drily. “But I think, if I was to...

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...they were after no good; and the first word I
heard, as I drew softly near,...

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...had stolen me from my own country; they had
killed poor Ransome; and was I to...

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...stopped me.

“David,” said he--“for I cannae bring to mind the name of your landed
estate, and...

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...cried, in a great admiration of my
candour. “There’s many a pretty gentleman that wouldnae dare...

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...had gone down, and
the wind was steady and kept the sails quiet; so that there...

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...smoke of my own firing, just as my ears seemed to be burst with
the noise...

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...when I began to hear stealthy steps and a brushing
of men’s clothes against the round-house...

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...last; and
Alan, leaping back to get his distance, ran upon the others like a bull,
roaring...

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...were many and bright,
Swift were they to behold,
...

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...me up, and I took my turn of three hours; before
the end of which it...

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...give ye
one of them to be a keepsake for last night’s work. And wherever ye...

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...we want is to be shut of him.”

Thereupon I consulted with Alan, and the parley...

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...Morar; or, in brief, where ye
please, within thirty miles of my own country; except in...

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...of water.”

That was the last clause of the treaty, and was duly executed on both
sides;...

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...upon the heather.

It was I that showed the example, telling him all my misfortune; which
he...

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...he was a rank usurper) spoke them fair and gave each man three
guineas in his...

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...I attend to. Whiles I pick up a few lads to
serve the King of France:...

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...together, and he ceased speaking. I have seen
many a grim face, but never a grimmer...

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...He declares all
the farms to let. And, thinks he, in his black heart, ‘I’ll soon...

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...rid of them by foul. Ardshiel was to
starve: that was the thing he aimed at....

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...wonder, with
never a gun or a sword left from Cantyre to Cape Wrath, but what
tenty[17]...

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...brightly.
The brig was close hauled, so as to round the southwest corner of the
Island of...

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...willing) for their
work. So, as I say, it fell to Mr. Riach to go aloft,...

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...the brig, sir;
I’ll mind that when we come to clear accounts.” And I believe he...

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...it came to the brig, he seemed to suffer along with her.

All the time of...

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...it; but I now know
it must have been the roost or tide race, which had...

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...ruggedest scramble I ever undertook--falling, the whole way,
between big blocks of granite, or leaping from...

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...the more unhappy.

And now, all at once, the yard came in my head. What had...

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...I had no sooner eaten my first
meal than I was seized with giddiness and retching,...

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...hand, over the low country of the Ross, I saw
smoke go up, morning and evening,...

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...sailors gave me my money again, they kept back
not only about a third of the...

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...wiser.

Well, all of a sudden, a coble with a brown sail and a pair of...

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...what I managed to eat of the shell-fish agreed well with me
and revived my courage.

I...

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...you I spoke English,” and began again as hard as
ever in the Gaelic.

This time I...

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...own nose, and no other landmark than Ben
More.

I aimed as well as I could for...

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...good fortune;
and the house, though it was thick with the peat-smoke and as full of
holes...

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...in so far as it
entertained me by the way. What was much more to the...

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...hear Jacobite toasts
and Gaelic songs, till all were tipsy and staggered off to the bed...

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...First, he knew he could have no more of my money; next, the
brogues were worth...

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...were weepons in this country, I could
shoot? Ay, could I!” cries he, and then with...

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...spoke
good English, and finding me to be something of a scholar, tried me
first in French,...

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...called
Neil Roy Macrob; and since Macrob was one of the names of Alan’s
clansmen, and Alan...

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...“Lochaber no more”) were
highly affecting even to myself.

At Kinlochaline I got Neil Roy upon one...

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...strong to
hold and difficult to travel, but full of prodigious wild and dreadful
prospects.

I had some...

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...and though of course I could not tell
what they discoursed about, yet I judged Mr....

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...said I. “If it is all
fear upon both sides, I care to hear no more...

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...the one lot, he’ll get his death by
the other.”

So we continued talking and walking the...

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...up with my adventures and with having come off, as the
saying is, with flying colours;...

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...land at the entering in of Loch
Leven that I begged to be set on shore....

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...and a net of lemons (to brew punch
with) hanging at the saddle-bow; as was often...

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...would have set ye right and bidden ye God
speed. But to-day--eh, Mungo?” And he turned...

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...of the upper wood, and so now, when I halted and
looked back, I saw all...

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...precaution, we
traced back again across the mountain-side by the same way that we had
come, only...

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...the Man and the Good People?”--by which he meant the fairies.

“No,” said I, “nor do...

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...that man in
the black coat?”

“I have nae clear mind about his coat,” said Alan cunningly;...

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...that country: he,
because he was a deserter, and the whole of Appin would now be...

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...like least to die by the gallows; and the picture of that
uncanny instrument came into...

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...adventures; and I shall here set down so much of Alan’s as
seems either curious or...

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...revenge and wealth
upon a single cast. It was seven against one; in that part of...

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...which is aye
good for a Campbell. I’m thinking it was a judgment on the clan...

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...sour with the sweet, man. Colin
Roy is dead, and be thankful for that!”

“Ay,” said James,...

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...mass of papers
and now and again setting one alight and burning it to the bitter...

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...scrape together three-and-five-pence-halfpenny, the most of it in
coppers.

“This’ll no do,” said Alan.

“Ye must find a...

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...paper him; what matters if
I paper him too? And then, Alan, I am a man...

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...on my consent, for I saw Alan
troubled; and, besides (thinks I to myself), as soon...

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...strange tongue), the news was
received with more of consternation than surprise.

For all our hurry, day...

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...sent the blood into my head again. Then,
putting his hands to his mouth, and his...

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...mortal
fear of some miscarriage. Even now we were on the rock he said nothing,
nor so...

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...you to your sleep,
lad, and I’ll watch.”

Accordingly, I lay down to sleep; a little peaty...

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...story
of the day that we had now to pass. You are to remember that we...

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...and
there spy out even in these memoirs.

The tediousness and pain of these hours upon the...

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...had ever taken part in. A man had need of a hundred eyes
in every part...

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...and
showed me many dark heads of mountains, and was reflected far underneath
us on the narrow...

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...stripped to the waist and
groping about or (as they say) guddling for these fish. The...

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...little clachan” (what is called a hamlet in
the English) “not very far from Corrynakiegh, and...

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...David, the
devil may fly away with him, for what I care; for he will no...

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...a man of more resources than I knew;
searched the wood until he found the quill...

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...bills in which we were described.

This we looked upon with great curiosity and not a...

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...I
do but hold my peace, and chafe, and take my chance of it?

“It’s little enough,”...

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...of the hillside till the mist should
have risen, and made ourselves a dish of drammach,...

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...least it was clear of
troops, which was our point.

We went down accordingly into the wasteland...

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...shape of a fan and riding their horses to and fro in
the deep parts of...

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...grown to be so unbearable
that I would gladly have given up. Nothing but the fear...

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...the
night, the shapes of the hills like things asleep, and the fire
dwindling away behind us,...

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...moment we were lying on our backs, each with a dirk at
his throat.

I don’t think...

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...spirits, much
refreshed by his sleep, very hungry, and looking pleasantly forward to a
dram and a...

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...with some
comfort. A projection of the cliff had been cunningly employed to be the
fireplace; and...

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...all touched glasses and drank. I am sure I wished no ill to
King George; and...

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...clan; and this with a proscribed, fugitive chief;
his country conquered; the troops riding upon all...

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...Whiggish, canting talk is this, for the house of Cluny
Macpherson?”

“I will put my hand in...

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...was a doctor too, was called in to prescribe for
me; but as he spoke in...

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...dream all morning, only disturbed
by the passing by of Cluny’s scouts and servants coming with...

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...said I, “if they lose, you give them back their money; and if
they win, they...

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...he
was a man that, in plain contest, I could have broken on my knee.

Doubtless it...

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...have to say that I’m sorry; and so that’s said. And now if
you have anything,...

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...speak less about
yourself; and when a friend that likes you very well has passed over...

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...we had carried from the Cage; and as for drink, Heaven knows
we had no want...

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...help,
and always hoping (as I could very well see) that my displeasure would
blow by. For...

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...with a gibing voice
and face.

I knew it was my own doing, and no one else’s;...

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...he began to
whistle a Jacobite air. It was the air made in mockery of General...

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...my anger oozed all out of me; and I found myself
only sick, and sorry, and...

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...neither one of us
to mend the other--that’s the truth! We must just bear and forbear,...

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...to avoid them.

Chance served us very well; for it was a household of Maclarens that...

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...change my age or person; and Lowland boys of eighteen were not so
rife in these...

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...my brother raised a part of the ‘Gregara,’ and
marched six companies to strike a stroke...

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...many years back, I could never hear that
the Macgregor had the best of it.”

“Do ye...

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...you.”

Each ate a small portion of the ham and drank a glass of the brose...

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...in his seat; and long before that
piece was at an end, the last signs of...

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...herd of deer, the happiest ten
hours of sleep in a fine, breathing sunshine and on...

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...earthly but the washing of the water on
the piers. At last there came by an...

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...can see we’re
making bad worse. If it’s hard to pass a river, it stands to...

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...but it’s a heart-break!”

In Limekilns we entered a small change-house, which we only knew to...

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...pushed open
the change-house door, he seemed to be half carrying me. The maid
appeared surprised (as...

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...said she, in a tearful voice.

“That has he so!” cried Alan, “if we could but...

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...rather a long tongue,” she said at last to Alan.

“Ay,” said Alan; “but ye see...

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...Scotland than myself.”

Her face cleared up mightily at this, although Alan’s darkened.

“That’s more than I...

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...expression for my thanks; but she was no less
abashed at the thought of hearing them;...

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...to shame for my foul tatters.

As the morning went on, and the fires began to...

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...much struck with my poor appearance that he came straight
up to me and asked me...

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...mother?” said he.

“My father was Alexander Balfour, schoolmaster of that place,” said I,
“and my mother...

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...have a proverb in the country that
evil-doers are aye evil-dreaders.”

“You are not to forget, sir,”...

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...and manner which went far to conquer my distrust.
Moreover, I could see he now treated...

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...manner, was
mentioned under the style of Mr. Thomson’s kinsman; Colin Campbell
passed as a Mr. Glen;...

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...and laid out some clothes that belonged to his son; and here, with
another apposite tag,...

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...sorrows into the lug of Tom, Dick, and
Harry. Your father, Mr. David, was a kind...

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...the estate, raised a cry of
murder; so that upon all sides he found himself evited....

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...did--mark
this, Mr. David!--it would be my duty to lay hands on him. Now I put...

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...and telling it again with fresh details and laughter; so that I
began at last to...

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...march, walking behind with Torrance
and sending me forward in the manner of a scout. I...

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...needless he should hear more of your
adventures or those of--ahem--Mr. Thomson.”

Accordingly these two went on...

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...“but the point is, Would I go? Now I will
tell you what I am thinking....

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...my
friends,” added Alan, simply, “are no very well off.”

My uncle cleared his throat. “I’m no...

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...hall
door. Either give me an answer in civility, and that out of hand; or by
the...

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...do ye mean?” cried Ebenezer. “Did Hoseason tell ye?”

“Why, ye donnered auld runt, how else...

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...quoth Alan, drawing
himself up, like one who smelt an offence.

“Only, sir, that you mentioned a...

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...woods that had been my ancestors’ and were
now mine. Even as I spoke on these...

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...THE PARTING

_For we both knew without a word said that we had come to where...

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...seek out a lawyer, who was an Appin Stewart,
and a man therefore to be wholly...

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...these braws and novelties)
there was a cold gnawing in my inside like a remorse for...

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...THE WILLOWS
_By_ KENNETH GRAHAME

THE QUEEN’S MUSEUM AND OTHER FANCIFUL TALES
_By_ FRANK...