Lay Morals, and Other Papers

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the Chatto and Windus 1911 edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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... ...

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...stage of leprosy. When
the man was gone, my husband asked if she had no...

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...if you find you have contracted leprosy?' I
asked. 'Do?' he replied; 'why, you and...

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...Sydney, a month or
two later, the very journal containing the letter condemnatory of Father
Damien was...

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...his own.

...

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...III. The Hill-End of Drumlowe




LAY MORALS


_The following chapters of a projected treatise on Ethics...

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...about life and conduct, subjects on which they
have themselves so few and such confused opinions?...

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...is found, all enters into a plan, a human nature
appears, the politician or the stage-king...

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...and
agreeable to receive, and the mind runs out to meet it ere the phrase be
done....

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...beyond tradition and returns with
some covert hint of things outside. Then only can you...

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...his mind must
follow after profit with some conscience and Christianity of method. A
man cannot...

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...than a shadow, language much more inexact than
the tools of a surveyor; from day to...

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...such relation, say, as Hoyle
stands in to the scientific game of whist. The comparison...

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...our Western
saints and heroes, does the law of the state supersede the higher law of
duty....

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...on the college benches, who had only one shirt to his back,
and, at intervals sufficiently...

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...remain at home to
die, and with all their possibilities be lost to life and mankind;...

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...help to
mankind, as mankind, out of its treasury, had lent a help to him.

I do...

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...that
this is theft? Again, if you carelessly cultivate a farm, you have been
playing fast...

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...two thoughts on
the utility or honourableness of his pursuit. I would say less if...

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...your neighbour as
yourself, but he can tell more or less whether you have murdered, or
stolen,...

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...to which alone it can apply.



CHAPTER III


Although the world and life have in a sense...

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... His sight, which conducts him, which takes
notice of the farthest stars, which is miraculous...

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...we are to make
any account of this figment of reason, the distinction between material
and immaterial,...

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...is Something that was
before hunger and that remains behind after a meal. It may...

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...as it is yourself; but is it not of a higher spirit than you had
dreamed...

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...reconciliations; the intimacy is at
times almost suspended, at times it is renewed again with joy....

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...the other.
The desire survives, strengthened, perhaps, but taught obedience and
changed in scope and character. ...

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...and set adrift in a stimulating world, they
develop a tendency to go bodily to sleep;...

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...opinion; as they will bring us, in one
word, _profit_. We must be what is...

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...hold counsel with your
soul and look around you on the possibilities of life.

This is not,...

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...declaring yourself?
Perhaps in some dim way, like a child who delivers a message not fully
understood,...

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...faithfully hold, the many, in
their dead jargon, repeat, degrade, and misinterpret.

So far of Respectability; what...

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...more jovial
to suppose them _right enough for practical purposes_. I will engage my
head, they...

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...love, and any
other only a derision and grimace. It should be the same with...

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...our current
doctrines, they have swallowed up the others and are thought to conclude
in themselves all...

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...may be full, and the heart empty. He may have gained
the world and lost...

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...of others,
to love with such generosity of heart that your love is still a dear
possession...

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...long as we are loved by
others, I would almost say that we are indispensable; and...

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...two Englishmen of the nineteenth century beyond the reach of
needs and duties. Society was...

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...in your churches. 'It is easier for a camel to pass through
the eye of...

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...in the present day. I am addressing the middle and the
upper classes; those who...

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...we, of the easier classes, are in a state of surfeit
and disgrace after meat. ...

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...industrious hands from the
production of what is useful or pleasurable and to keep them busy...

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...any fancied social decency or duty. I shall not wear gloves
unless my hands are...

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...principle of life. The
Bohemian of the novel, who drinks more than is good for...

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...Decline in material
expenditure, and you will find they care no more for you than for...

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...each man must solve for
himself, and about which none has a right to judge him....

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...occur to you that we have met, and visited, and
conversed; on my side, with interest....

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...'HONOLULU,
...

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...I
may best explain to you the character of what you are to read: I conceive
you...

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...you have never
visited the scene of Damien's life and death. If you had, and...

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...a
gentleman of your reverend profession allow me an example from the fields
of gallantry? When...

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...to the Reverend H. B. Gage.

You may ask on what authority I speak. It...

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...Damien) to the lights and joys of human
life. One of these wept silently; I...

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...sores and
stumps.

You will say, perhaps, I am too sensitive, that sights as painful abound
in cancer...

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...but yet destitute of real authority, so that
his boys laughed at him and he must...

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...that he knew you. Take it, and observe with
wonder how well you were served...

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...Protestant Bibles Peter
is called Saint.

Damien was _dirty_.

He was. Think of the poor lepers annoyed...

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...own officials: 'We went round all the
dormitories, refectories, etc.--dark and dingy enough, with a superficial
cleanliness,...

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...seem to deceive you. This scandal, when I read it in
your letter, was not...

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...you would not
care to have to dinner, on the one side; on the other, the...

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... ...

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...a number of soldiers, proportionate to his
wealth, were quartered on the offender. The coarse...

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...way.'
{88}

This was the state of matters, when an outrage was committed which gave
spirit and determination...

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...the body. The pieces of tobacco-pipe with which it
was loaded, to the number of...

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...into the street in his
night-shirt. Here Gray showed himself very desirous of killing him,...

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...evidently
forgeries--that, and his final flight, appear to indicate that he was an
agent of the Royalists,...

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... It fell
Mr. Robinsone to seeke the blessing, who said one of the most bombastick
graces...

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...misery.' {97}

The whole body, too, swore the Covenant, to which ceremony the epitaph at
the head...

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...and within that
distance from their homes. At last, to their horror, they discovered
that the...

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...fifty Royalist horse sent
obliquely across the hill to attack the left wing of the rebels....

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...of death for long, and when at last they were buried by
charity, the peasants dug...

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...WORK OF REFORMATION BY
...

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...and of their cause, the rust-hued
spots upon the flags were the tokens of their courage...

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...on
the Watter Gate at Edinburgh. The armes of all the ten, because they
hade with...

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...friends and relations!
Farewell the world and all delights! Farewell meat and drink! Farewell
sun,...

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...times might have justified to all the world, nature having
dictated to...

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...of
Government,' we seemed to cry; 'keep her head direct on liberty, and we
cannot help but...

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...and yet not perceive that we are all labouring
together to bring in Socialism at large....

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...consciences;
and the remedy proposed is to elect a round number of our neighbours,
pretty much at...

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...hands of my friend of the
eye-glass, he occasionally sets his lips to it; and he...

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...against in particular, but all of which, taken
together, show us that Socialism can be a...

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...to the lash. But if these things go on, we shall see, or
our sons...

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...himself; but in the end he
wearies for realities. Study or experiment, to some rare...

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...does not whip the
blood, it does not evoke the glory of contest; it is tragic,...

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...told it was beginning. Communes will not be all equal in
extent, nor in quality...

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...Tatler_; and on the 7th the first number
appeared. On Friday the 2nd of April...

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...verses,
and University grievances are the continual burthen of the song. But
_Mr. Tatler_ was not...

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...dozen of
pencils, or a six-bladed knife, or a quarter of a hundred quills,' at any
of...

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...own,
and the manner of frolicking and enjoying are so changed, that one pauses
and looks about...

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...Sister--Sister everyway!' A few restrictions, indeed, remain to
influence the followers of individual branches of...

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...well try

'To move wild laughter in the throat of death'

as to...

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...of old. Some of these men whom we see
gravely conversing on the steps have...

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...sufficient reason for intercourse that two
men sit together on the same benches. Let the...

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...atmosphere, that it shudders and withers
under the least draught of the free air that circulates...

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...but this is nothing to the purpose:
it is more important to ask whether the Senatus...

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...sentence will be
supplied by the next,' have been recommended by Dr. Samuel Johnson to
'attend to...

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...patronage on all occasions. This is a dangerous plan, and serves
oftener, I am afraid,...

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...into living and impressionable soul that we insist on their
utility. If we could once...

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...great requirement of
our student life; and it will therefore be no waste of time if...

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...exponent of those virtues. A ribbon of
the Legion of Honour or a string of...

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...that can expose
twenty-six shillings' worth of property to so many chances of loss and
theft. ...

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...not be said of the
bearers of these inappropriate umbrellas that they go about the streets
'with...

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...energy which it displays in affecting
the atmospheric strata. There is no fact in meteorology...

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...eye on some such
theory when he said that 'a good name is better than precious...

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...might have been a dentist, but he should
never have aspired to be a statesman. ...

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...book aside. In wise pursuance of such views, Mr. John Milton
Hengler, who not long...

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... But it becomes evident, on the most
hasty retrospect, that this earlier work was a...

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...form,
such as we should expect, and such as we do indeed find, still presents
the essential...

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...faded and sorrowfully
disappointing as the icicle. This is merely a simile poetically worked
out; and...

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...element, the point of audacity with which the fabulist was
wont to mock at his readers....

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...the truer
greatness, that of the vanquished fire or that of the victorious rain.
And the speech...

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...not so done, the whole tone is kindly and consolatory, and the
disenchanted man submissively takes...

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...the modern sort, and pleases us more, I think, as poetry should
please us, than anything...

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...interesting, when we see how the portraiture of a dog,
detailed through thirty odd lines, is...

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... With a player so variable as Salvini, who trusts to the
feelings of the moment...

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... Love has fallen
out of this marriage by the way, and left a curious friendship....

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...his wife tells him he needs repose, there is something
really childish in the way he...

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...seat; but somehow it is not anything we can call grief
that he displays. There...

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...their toes about the
prostrate king. A dance of High Church curates, or a hornpipe...

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...To do justice to the designs, it
will be necessary to say, for the hundredth time,...

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...closes round the pilgrims, 'the white robe falls from the black
man's body.' Despair 'getteth...

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...and Mr. Worldly-Wiseman, all have been imagined with the
same clearness, all written of with equal...

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...about an inch square for the
most part, sometimes printed three or more to the page,...

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...Bunyan's insight into life, the Enchanted Ground; where,
in a few traits, he has set down...

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...home. There is that in the action of one of
them which always reminds me,...

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...a dim, infernal luminosity.
Horrid fellows are they, one and all; horrid fellows and horrific scenes.
In...

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...in these sequences of cuts: a power of joining on one action
or one humour to...

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...betrodden scene of contest and among the shivers of
the darts; while just at the margin...

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...swarm of vermin; for every one we saw seemed to bear
openly upon his brow the...

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...most unreasonable to flee the knowledge of
good like the infection of a horrible disease, and...

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...me again, everything that I heard or
saw was rather a recollection than a discovery.

Weighed upon...

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...our house is a
great thoroughfare for early carts. I know not, and I never...

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...my pipe at the entrance to Old Greyfriars', thoroughly sick of
the town, the country, and...

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...is
certainly beyond denial. But it is round the boundary that there are the
finest tombs....

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...in so offensive a manner that I was put upon my dignity, and turned
grandly off...

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...of love.

Such was the elegant apostrophe that I made as I went out of the...

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...and
forsaking her, fostered in disrespect and neglect on the plea of growing
manliness, and at last...

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...their own.

I believe in a better state of things, that there will be no more...

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...do such an amount
of harm without a tongue? Wonderful industry--strange, fruitless,
pleasureless toil? Must...

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...are you to blow the coals for any Robin-run-agate? Get up, get on
your hood,...

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...in sight, and running close beside them, very faint in the
dying dusk, the pale ribbon...

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...sure that she had twice betrayed herself--betrayed by the
involuntary flash of her black eyes her...

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...tell
you it's a cruel hard thing upon a man of my time of life and...

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...blandishments, and said farewell
gravely enough to Lord Windermoor, shaking his hand and at the same...

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...they dwindled into points and
disappeared.

'There goes my only friend,' he said. 'Death has cut...

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...support what you support--you who are kind,
and therefore know how to feel pain; who are...

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...she, could interest this sorrowful Apollo, might she not learn?
or was she not learning? ...

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...have all broke down, and the grass and hemlock hide 'em. Well,
sir, here is...

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...shall wish you a
good slumber and a better awakening.'

Jonathan silently gave the lantern to Nance,...

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...ear like human
speech. It seemed to call upon him with a dreary insistence--to call...

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...bend my old creaking back
till it would ache like breaking; wade about in the foul...

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...for God?'

'Uncle Jonathan,' she said, getting up and taking him by the arm; 'you
sit down...

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...into wrath.

'Hush!' cried Nance, springing to her feet: 'your boy, your dead wife's
boy--Aunt Susan's baby...

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...the courtyard. He looked down,
and saw in a glimpse Nance standing below with hands...

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...and
the perfection of Nance's dream was for the first time troubled.

Jonathan was waiting for them...

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...are all tempted to revenge.'

'You have lost money?' asked Jonathan.

'A great estate,' said Archer quietly.

'See...

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...may call that three to one.
I'll call it brave when some one stops the mail...

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...him. She was, indeed, conscious
of such unshaken fortitude in her own heart, that she...

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...leave her at last as though he had
forgotten her existence. It was odd, too,...

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...rosy, that cut the knot, and that,
at last, in some great situation, fetched to her...

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...in his rheumy eyes, his eye-brows would lift as with a sudden
thought, his mouth would...

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...my single bed and the blood
never warms in me; this knee of mine it seems...

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...my love and
tell her I tried to take good care of you; for so I...

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...loss. So he was still sitting when Mr. Archer entered the
kitchen. At this...

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...suddenly sweet with the fragrance of
new grass.

Above and below the castle the river crooked like...

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...deceived, Mr. Archer,' returned Nance. 'I
would say there was a third choice, and that...

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...with his brows a little knit,
his chin upon one hand and that elbow resting on...

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...nearer.

'Now,' said he, 'you see these two channels--choose one.'

'I'll choose the nearest, to save time,'...

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...Archer, if I see you look so serious I shall begin to think
you was in...

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...table with a pot of ale, and proceeded to make himself agreeable
after his fashion.

'Fine doings...

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...Sam, 'that old fat fagot Engleton, him as held the
ribbons and drew up like a...

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...uncle a
better gentleman than any thief.'

'And you would be right,' said Mr. Archer.

'How many snuff-boxes...

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...well!' replied the guard, 'if you've been shot yourself, that
explains. But as for contentment,...

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...entrancing women, nor was any fairer than herself.
She was tall, being almost of a height...

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...blew in the city. The first day of that wind, they say in
the countries...

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...shone resplendent to her fancy.

The high inhuman note of the wind, the violence and continuity...

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...in these campaigns: that is the degree of admiration offered by the
man; and to our...

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...had come from the same formal gathering at
which the others had preceded him; and perhaps...

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...it had
embittered, that predominant passion. His first look was for his wife, a
look of...

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...might be feared or braved, it should never
be respected. And with that there came...

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...of admiration more
distinct than words. He bowed, he stammered, his words failed him; he
who...

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...to that of a more
active misery, it seemed as if the voices of the bells...

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...in
Italy, and buzzed about by priests? A pretty king, if he had not a
martial...

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...with Kentigern; here fell into his enchanted trance. And the
legend of his slumber seems...

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...was fined,
rejoiced greatly to suffer for the Kirk; but it was rather her husband
that suffered....

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...to begin
life again by the wayside as a common beggar. She took him up...

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...laird, and winked hard at
the doings in Montroymont. This curate was a man very...

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...eyes
sealed, or in his cabinet sitting bemused over the particulars of the
coming bankruptcy; and the...

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...a 'daft auld
fule,' and saw her running and dodging him among the whins and hags...

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...of alarm,
because Crozer was much the heavier boy.

'Ye're feared. Heathercat indeed!' said Crozer, for...

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...and again looking back and
crying angry words to the boy, where he stood mystified.

By the...

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...and that upon two congenial subjects:
the deficiencies of the Lady Whitecross and the turpitudes of...

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...marine place of the Bass Rock, which, with my delicate kist,
would be fair ruin to...

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...to see you I was
to hide.'

Montroymont sighed. 'Well, and that's good of her too,'...

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...and have a drop brandy: for the stomach's sake! Even the deil
can quote Scripture--eh,...

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...I never meddled her. It was just
daffing, I tell ye: daffing, and nae mair:...

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...hill. On the far side the ground swelled into a bare
heath, black with junipers,...

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...hope. 'One pull more!' he seemed to cry; 'one pull more, and it's
done. ...

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...bield from the wind of the
Lord's anger? Do ye call _this_ a wind? ...

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...hill-bird stirred with inordinate
passion, succeeded to intervals of silence; and Francie heard them with a
critical...

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...* * *

...