Memoir of Fleeming Jenkin

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1901 Charles Scribner’s Sons edition by David Price,
email ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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...memoir appearing alone,
shorn of that other matter which was at once its occasion and its
justification,...

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...Thomas, Henry, or Robert) sat in the same place of
humble honour. Of their wealth...

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...particular their
connection is singularly involved. John and his wife were each descended
in the third...

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...Marines, and was
lost on the Dogger Bank in the war-ship _Minotaur_. If he did...

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...is still more strange, among
the relics of the handsome midshipman and his stay in the...

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...aunt, and died in her care at Ghent in 1792. Next she adopted
William, the...

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...depth of
winter, the father would bid young Charles saddle his pony; they would
ride the thirty...

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...was carried by his father
to Chichester to the Bishop’s Palace. The Bishop had heard...

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...part in the dreary and disgraceful afterpiece of St. Helena. Life
on the guard-ship was...

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...come on deck at night; and
with his broad Scotch accent, ‘Well, sir,’ he would say,...

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...of the harbour, and the object of the Mixed Commission
compromised. Without consultation with any...

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...of the facts. The
marriage was not in itself unhappy; Adcock was a gentleman by...

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...the mother of the subject of this
notice, Fleeming Jenkin. She was a woman of...

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...and horsewhipped the
man with her own hand.

How a match came about between this talented and...

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...other side, the wild, cruel,
proud, and somewhat blackguard stock of the Scotch Campbell-Jacksons, had
put forth,...

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...(when he does not drop into cookery receipts) of
pumps, road engines, steam-diggers, steam-ploughs, and steam-threshing
machines;...

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...a Government building on the coast of
Kent, near Dungeness, where his father was serving at...

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...year; my nuts blazed away
together very comfortably to the end of their lives, and when...

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...he had his quick sight of many sides of life; he already
overflowed with distinctions and...

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...to illuminate their houses,
and bearing torches. This was all very...

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...sweetened by the night air—though night in these splendid streets was
turned...

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... troops. That way or the Boulevards I must pass. In the...

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...is a National Guard, and he said he had only
his own...

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... carriages, said first to contain the Count de Paris and the Duchess
...

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...burning, or doing much harm. In the Tuileries they have
dressed...

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... ...

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...sort of _tableau vivant_, the top man holding up
the red flag...

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...day
when he saw and heard Rachel recite the ‘_Marseillaise_’ at the Français,
the tricolour in her...

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...cupidity in their
nature,’ were now about to play a variation on the theme rebellion. ...

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...last time if I stayed in the house a quarter
of an hour! But I...

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...Ruffini, deputy for Genoa and soon to be head of the
University, was at their side;...

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...Sunday, April 1, Fleeming and the captain went
for a ramble beyond the walls, leaving Aunt...

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...husband’s body among the slain, saved it for two days, brought the
widow a lock of...

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...their friend Ruffini was then, or soon
after, raised to be the head of the University;...

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...life drawn from
one of Raphael’s cartoons.’ His holidays were spent in sketching; his
evenings, when...

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...own art.

The defects and advantages of such a training were obvious in Fleeming
throughout life. ...

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...interest. Whatever a man can do or know, he longed to know
and do also....

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...moving daily
among those strange creations of man’s brain, to some so abhorrent, to
him of an...

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...either side, the
masters stultified their cause by obstinate impolicy, and the men
disgraced their order by...

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...or (as
might be said) of setting out the work, purely empirical and in no way
connected...

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...before he sat down to write his letter,
he thought he had hit upon the explanation....

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...besides when apart from
circumstances, few men are agreeable to their neighbours and still fewer
to themselves;...

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...ugly, clear-sighted, loving son sitting at her side in one
of his rare hours of pleasure,...

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...the chances of our meeting that person would be
small indeed; our intuition would often fail;...

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...place in those days of intellectual society. Edward
Barron, the son of a rich saddler...

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...sacred and stood
within the pale from criticism. It was a house, besides, of unusual
intellectual...

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...his father in mild urbanity of
disposition. Show Fleeming an active virtue, and he always...

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...in the new
field of marine telegraphy; and Fleeming was already face to face with
his life’s...

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...of a nature essentially noble and outspoken. A happy and
high-minded anger flashed through his...

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...their association, Fleeming brought the valuable
element of a practical understanding; but he never thought or...

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... This was the walk he took his young
wife on the morrow of his return....

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...what the hedges are very necessary, and our
stray travellers often have a weary time of...

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...was to the end of a most deliberate
growth. In the next chapter, when I...

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...is not for me to speak: his
friend and partner, Sir William Thomson, has contributed a...

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...abroad: ‘The country will give us, please
God, health and strength. I will love and...

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...rare
strain, and to a man still unsuccessful must have been precious indeed.
There was yet a...

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...up the coach-house to my own and Christine’s admiration. Then
encouraged...

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...have snoozed in my chair after dinner; I do not
go in...

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...Sunday I was at Isleworth, chiefly engaged in playing
with Odden. ...

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...proved to be a lifelong
misfortune. Mrs. Jenkin was taken suddenly and alarmingly ill; Fleeming
ran...

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...Forde began suddenly to pay well; about the same
time the patents showed themselves a valuable...

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...give a picture of his work so clear that a child
may understand, and so attractive...

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...a cable for him last autumn—Fleeming Jenkin (at the time in
considerable mental agitation) having the...

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...let us have by the 15th—and how the rest is to be got, who
knows? ...

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... ...

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...case. All that day we lay in Holyhead, but I could
neither read nor write...

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...especially at heavy rolls. When I hint he is not improving, there
comes a confession:...

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...carried the
day, signed as chief and acts as second. Shakespeare and Byron are his
favourite...

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...use it as blisters for their horses. Is that the same sort? No,
take...

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...people call them—and smelling the
rich brushwood. There was nothing for a pencil to sketch,...

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...swell pitch her about till it got slack, and then
tightening again with blocks and pulleys,...

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...from the cable which brought it up, these
have been our only obstructions. Sixty, seventy,...

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...be ten miles ahead: by that time, we
should be according to a chart in about...

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...and am getting them rigged
up as fast as may be. Bad news from the...

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...this means hangs nearly vertical and sustains no strain but that
caused by its own weight...

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... ‘June 16.

‘Up this morning at three, coupled my self-acting...

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...these in a little valley,
framed by mountains whose rocks gleam out blue and purple colours...

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...pulley used for the
paying-out machinery with a spindle wheel, which might suit me. I...

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...the young cable! We are
apparently crossing its path—not the working one, but the lost...

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... I have an unexpected opportunity of forwarding
this engineering letter; for the craft which brought...

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...we came to the buoys, proving our anticipations right
concerning the crossing of the cables. ...

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...am much discontented
with myself for idly lounging about and reading _Westward Ho_! for the
second time,...

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...loop drawn tight,
all the wires get twisted and the gutta-percha inside pushed out. These
much...

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...same good mood—for which thank you and our friend Shakespeare. I am
happy to say...

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... ‘July 2.

‘Twenty-eight miles safe in the hold. The...

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...and late at night
Syra itself. _Adam Bede_ in one hand, a sketch-book in the...

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...formed of open stalls under the first story, in which squat
tailors, cooks, sherbet vendors and...

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...built of adamant. Time has worn
away the softer portions of the rock, only leaving...

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...was made to get her astern, an anchor taken out,
a rope brought to a winch...

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... ...

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...to preventing actual contact
with the natives, for they might come as near and talk as...

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...series is quite imperfect; and this is the more to
be lamented as he had now...

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...in
preference to the friar’s, or the owl- and bat-haunted tower. MM. T— and
S— will...

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...scream among the trees under the high
mouldering battlements.—A little lower down, the band played. ...

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...leave them with a good conscience. The little encampment looked quite
picturesque: the green round...

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...the conclusion there was a break. Two of my faithful
Cagliaritans slept all night in...

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...to
be on the crest of a kind of submarine mountain in prolongation of Cape
de Gonde,...

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...buoys on board, &c. To-morrow I expect to leave
for Spartivento.’



IV.


And now I am quite...

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...anchored in the right place and next morning we
hoped the shore end would be laid,...

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...for the sake of the ship itself, already almost a
legend even to the generation that...

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...it is not very much, but ‘twill suffice. Thomson
shook hands and wished me well....

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...Rookh_. _Plymouth_, _June_ 22.—We have been a little cruise in
the yacht over to the...

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...nothing to it. The ear
normally hangs down behind; the goat turns sideways to her...

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...And it is now time to lay narration by,
and to look at the man he...

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...of Highlanders; and once to Styria, to hunt
chamois and dance with peasant maidens. All...

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...is still a mystery to those who knew them; but Mr. Austin
always declared that on...

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...by
their mothers—Arithmetic and Reading.’ Prizes were given; but what prize
would be so conciliatory as...

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...for you on many grounds, but one is that I may not be obliged to
deliver...

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...much against Mill—but that is not my affair.
Education of that kind! . . . I...

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...with its legs over a little pier, watching
Frewen and Bernie getting up steam for the...

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...yet: for three days they
lay storm-stayed in Poolewe, and when they put to sea on...

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...he deigned to approve of: ‘_fast so gut wie ein
bauer_,’ was his trenchant criticism. ...

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...from town. And he, who was so cavalier
with men of his own class, was...

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...view, the greatest actor he had seen. We were all
indeed moved and bettered by...

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...Hole, Captain Charles
Douglas, Mr. Kunz, Mr. Burnett, Professor Lewis Campbell, Mr. Charles
Baxter, and many more—made...

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...as one takes a hand at whist; and found his
true service and pleasure in the...

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...far the most of those
who fell under his domination, and particularly (it is pleasant to
remember)...

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...of their fruition. And the illusion was
characteristic. Fleeming believed we had only to...

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... The instrument itself was not to be
purchased—I think no specimen had then crossed the...

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...in the great tragedy, in the laws of the tempest, or in the
properties of energy...

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...in the vast pleasantry of my
curriculum. I was not able to follow his lectures;...

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... He
made no reproach in speech, but his manner was the more eloquent; it told
me...

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...formal apology
for the pain he had inflicted; adding drolly, but truly, ‘You see, at
that time...

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...singled
out and ticketed ‘the cause’? ‘You do not understand,’ said he. ‘A
cause is...

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...would not have counselled me
anything unkind or cowardly, ‘No,’ he said, with one of his...

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...literature, it was not art, it was not morality; there was no
sustenance in such a...

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...set on edge,
however, by didactic writing; and held that books should teach no other
lesson but...

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...among his friends.
It was one of his special charms; now when the voice is silent...

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...what was once a very pleasant spot, the old Savile
Club, not then divorced from Savile...

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...Trélat will pardon me if I correct, even before I quote
him; but what the Frenchman...

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... nous nous étonnions réciproquement de la diversité de nos points de
...

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...cela mélancoliquement; et c’était la première fois que je lui
entendais faire...

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...Angleterre en 1882 sans pouvoir gagner Edimbourg.
J’y retournai en 1883 avec...

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...salon; et nous nous séparions le soir à Trafalgar
Square, après avoir...

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...might
almost seem to fancy that she had read the letter and taken the hint; for
to...

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...further jumbling the threads of her
intelligence, but by degrees so gradual and with such partiality...

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...When he paid a call, he would have her write ‘with love’
upon a card; or...

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...letter’s sake) a work of Vernon Lee’s, which
proved, however, more than he was quite prepared...

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...manifold causes of gratitude:
surely the most innocent speech, the old, sharp contemner of his
innocence now...

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...1884, Mr. Austin was taken. He was seventy-eight years of
age, suffered sharply with all...

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...charming—charming arrangement,’ was the Captain’s only
commentary. It was the proper thing for a dying...

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...he was not only worn out with sorrow, he was worn out by hope.
The singular...

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... Now he was to revisit Italy, and see all the pictures and the
buildings and...

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...ability, but with his resolution to understand
everything spoken of, to see if possible thoroughly through...

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...the last year that convenient instruments for working, in absolute
measure, have been introduced at all,...

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...is
due to experimental work by Jenkin, described in a paper, ‘Experiments on
Capacity,’ constituting No. IV....

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...papers on purely engineering subjects, though not numerous, are
interesting and valuable. Amongst these may...

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...The horrors of what was called the ‘Sandwich
system,’ amongst other evils, were brought to light....

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...that now supposed.

The problem was to ensure to the great body of the citizens sound
professional...

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...sufficient number of persons, to form such a ‘group’
as had been contemplated, was the first...

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... to inspect and report on the existence of any infraction or supposed
...

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...hold of, and insist
upon, what he felt to be wholesome and right will understand how...

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...recently ran down.’ A properly ‘trapped’ and ventilated drain was
the cure for this.

And the...

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...that no air to be breathed, no water to be drunk,
should ever be contaminated by...

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...than one lady (who
should have been perhaps mentioned earlier on this list) well known for
large...

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...time as
occasion required; at the moment of writing employment is found in
Edinburgh and country districts...

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...idea of the scheme
then in contemplation, with a third addressed to the Medico-Chirurgical
Society. This...

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...debt of gratitude is due to him who has placed (as has been
attempted to be...

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... But for the ordinary houses of
the poor the advice of the Association’s engineers has...