Memories and Portraits

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1912 Chatto and Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org




MEMORIES AND
PORTRAITS


...

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... ...

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...two others have enjoyed only what may he regarded as
a private circulation.

...

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... Ireland, Wales, and the Scottish mountains still
cling, in part, to their old Gaelic speech....

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...plum pudding,
and no tomfoolery. Here we have either pole of the Britannic folly. ...

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...ignorance of the
sister kingdom cannot be described; it can only be illustrated by
anecdote. I...

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... When the
Scotch child sees them first he falls immediately in love; and from that
time...

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...neglected peasant, sunk in matter,
insolent, gross and servile, makes a startling contrast with our own
long-legged,...

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...themselves in life, and gather up those
first apprehensions which are the material of future thought...

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...roaring winters, of the gloom of
high-lying, old stone cities, imminent on the windy seaboard; compared
with...

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...frost tingles in our blood; no proctor lies in
wait to intercept us; till the bell...

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...different language, worshipped in
another church, held different morals, and obeyed a different social
constitution from his...

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...the
Southern knack, he will still have a strong Scotch accent of the mind.




CHAPTER II. SOME...

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...my successors of to-day. Of the specific points of change, of
advantage in the past,...

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...went, a link snapped with the last century.
He had something of a rustic air, sturdy...

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...simplicity would he then show,
trying to amuse us like children with toys; and what an...

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...continue to be so, it will not surprise you
very much that I have no intention...

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...street. In the cool air and
silence, and among the sleeping houses, his strength was...

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...in the
hot fits of youth, I came to be unhappy. Pleasant incidents are woven
with...

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...from within: to know his own for one
among the thousand undenoted countenances of the city...

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...soon wearies of the inhumanity of Obermann.
And even while I still continued to be a...

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...his faithful memory notches the burials of our
race. To suspect Shakespeare in his maturity...

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...act had
now another part to play; and the time had come when others were to...

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...most beautiful in person, most
serene and genial by disposition; full of racy words and quaint...

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...is, to those who remained true to him, the
tale of a success. In his...

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...cathedral leave him;
God accept him,
Christ receive him!"



IV


If...

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...ways also; often
accompanied my walks with dramatic dialogues, in which I played many
parts; and often...

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...of _The King's Pardon_, a tragedy, I was
on the trail of no lesser man than...

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...astonish the considerate. Before he can tell what
cadences he truly prefers, the student should...

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...books in their wire
cages; and a corridor with a fireplace, benches, a table, many prints...

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...even him I suppose it rendered reckless; for he took
flight to London, and there, in...

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...fought his paper
single-handed; trusting no one, for he was something of a cynic; up early
and...

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...the railings at the Tron, I could not withhold my lips
from smiling publicly. Yet,...

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...back in one day from the printed
author to the manuscript student.



III


From this defunct periodical I...

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...Hind let Loose_.

Now, as I could not bear to let such a man pass away...

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...the fallen
Dionysius. Nor were the disagreeables purely fanciful and metaphysical,
for the sway that he...

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...foxgloves, the very truth was that he scorned all flowers
together. They were but garnishings,...

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...she said it wi' a sigh_,--'_The half of it hath not
been told unto me_.'"

As far...

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...entreaty: "_Eh_, _but_, _gentlemen_, _I wad hae nae mair words
about it_!" One thing was...

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...greet the haughty
Babylonian; for in his life he was lowly, and a peacemaker and a...

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...and that of all its tributaries; the
geographer of this Lilliput may visit all its corners...

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...his cries were not yet silenced late at night. This
wrathful voice of a man...

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...devious, tactical ascent which seems peculiar to men of his trade.
I might count him with...

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...a farmer about Braid had
found a pair of sheep; and thither went John and the...

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...to see if he were anywhere observed, plunge in
and repeatedly wash himself over head and...

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...is often described
as Probably Arboreal, which may serve for recognition. Each has his own
tree...

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...snuff-mill
just above, and these, tumbling merrily in, shake the pool to its black
heart, fill it...

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...hands in divers foreign
places: a well-beloved house--its image fondly dwelt on by many
travellers.

Here lived an...

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...forges for a pastime, and with no design upon
reality. Nothing was more unlikely than...

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...as black as the chimney before I had done with it.
He loved port, and nuts,...

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...the old, smoky city; or, upon some holiday excursion, we
may have looked into the windows...

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...a "thrawe," and his
workmen fled into the tower, then nearly finished, and he sat unmoved
reading...

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...sand, where I once
waded deep in butterburrs, delighting to hear the song of the river...

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...same day we visited the shores of the isle in the ship's
boats; rowed deep into...

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...was observed
to run low upon the reef, there would be a sound of preparation in...

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...The lighthouse
settlement scarce encroached beyond its fences; over the top of the first
brae the ground...

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...the unsparing
war, the grinding slavery of competition; the toil of seventy years,
dear-bought bread, precarious honour,...

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...But to the general public and the world of London, except
about the parliamentary committee-rooms, he...

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...inventions centred; these proceeded
from, and acted back upon, his daily business. Thus it was...

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...appointment
they regarded their original work as something due already to the nation,
and none of them...

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...asking, and no man on any ground whatever; and the same
sentiment found another expression in...

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...races. For all
these emotional extremes, and in spite of the melancholy ground of his
character,...

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...fosters our friendships, and can be enjoyed at any age and in almost
any state of...

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...runs half the time on these eternal lines. The
theme being set, each plays on...

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...Such argument as is
proper to the exercise should still be brief and seizing. Talk...

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...suggestion than the
stable features of the landscape. Sailors and shepherds, and the people
generally of...

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...shared.

There is a certain attitude, combative at once and deferential, eager to
fight yet most averse...

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...man of a great presence; he
commands a larger atmosphere, gives the impression of a grosser...

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...darkness; the other, with many changing hues of fire, burns at
the sea-level, like a conflagration;...

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...minute or two together, and perhaps fail to throw it in the
end. And there...

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...Sirens, he still hearkens to the
barking of the Sphinx. Jarring Byronic notes interrupt the...

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...they should appear in a
biography, and with the portrait of the speaker. Good talk...

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...to his younger brother,
the conscientious gentleman I feel never quite sure of your urbane and
smiling...

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...hear
nothing but approving echoes, he will lose his hold on the soberness of
things and take...

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...life. Their speech, indeed, is timid; they report lions in
the path; they counsel a...

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...was all fallen away and fallen in; crooked and shrunken; buckled
into a stiff waistcoat for...

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...the author--known him, too, for a
Tory; and to the genuine classic a contemporary is always...

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..._Othello_," and the contrast blazed
up in my mind like a bonfire. An unforgettable look...

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...you know you have transgressed,
and your friend says nothing and avoids your eye. If...

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...what is
humorous. As soon as a strong current of mutual admiration begins to
flow, the...

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...one long
conversation, chequered by disputes. The disputes are valueless; they
but ingrain the difference; the...

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...dog and man, after and perhaps before the
different duration of their lives, is that the...

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...with eyes have been unable to detect a fault so gross
and obvious. If a...

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...illuminate the point; but men, like dogs, have an elaborate and
mysterious etiquette. It is...

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...the sexes and perverted
their relations. Thus, when we regard the manners of the dog,...

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...accepted
uncomplainingly the other day from an indignant fair one, I begin to hope
the period of...

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...habit. Here, it is not the similarity, it
is the difference, that is worthy of...

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...under pain of derogation, will do wisely to conform. How often
has not a cold...

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...unequal virtues and mortal frailties
of the best. Still more painful is the bearing of...

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...the affection warms and strengthens till it
fills the soul. But doubtless, also, the masters...

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...the first plate of characters, bearded, pistol in
hand, or drawing to his ear the clothyard...

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...feet he ran,
and how he laughed aloud in exultation! I can hear that laughter...

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... You might,
indeed, set up a scene or two to look at; but to cut...

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...their bold attitude, array of deadly engines and
incomparable costume, to-day look somewhat pallidly; the extreme...

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...came
to visit it, was only Skelt made evident: to cross the border was, for
the Scotsman,...

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... I seem to myself to wander in a ghostly street--E. W., I think,
the postal...

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...Of
Moliere--surely the next greatest name of Christendom--I could tell a
very similar story; but in a...

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...in which it was so easy to forget myself, my cares,
and my surroundings: a place...

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..._ma foi_! _bien heureux_." I am reminded of it,
as I say; and the next...

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...They
would never have fallen in the mud with Dumas and poor La Valliere. It
is...

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...by the animal details; another to whom these were harmless,
perhaps even pleasing, shall yet have...

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...official honesty, and fiscal competence.
And Dumas knew it well: three times at least he shows...

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...and perfectly
improbable trick upon Milady. What a pleasure it is, then, what a
reward, and...

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...by one. One by one
they go, and not a regret embitters their departure; the...

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...and
the coming of day are still related in my mind with the doings of John
Rann...

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...immoral, but simply a-moral; which either does not regard
the human will at all, or deals...

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...Hawes Inn at the Queen's Ferry makes a
similar call upon my fancy. There it...

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...longings of the reader, and to obey
the ideal laws of the day-dream. The right...

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...clink of
teaspoons and the accents of the curate. It is thought clever to write...

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...farm kitchen. Up to that moment he had sat content,
huddled in his ignorance, but...

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...is one long-drawn error,
gloomy, bloody, unnatural and dull; but as for these early chapters, I...

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...yet we may read a dozen boisterous stories from
beginning to end, and not receive so...

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...the
pleasure that we take is critical; we watch, we approve, we smile at
incongruities, we are...

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...and green
possession, not unworthy of that beautiful name, _The Lady of the Lake_,
or that direct,...

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...castle
with water, was engaged in bleaching linen." A man who gave in such copy
would...

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...two men certainly of very different calibre:
Mr. James so precise of outline, so cunning of...

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...we to add "in prose"? _The Odyssey_ appears to me the best of
romances; _The...

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...is in every biography with
any salt of life, it is in every history where events...

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...pulse is, in almost every
case, purely agreeable; that these phantom reproductions of experience,
even at their...

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...illogical, abrupt and poignant;
a work of art, in comparison, is neat, finite, self-contained, rational,
flowing and...

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..."because," says he, comparing it with another
work, "_I have been a child_, _but I have...

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...as they realise the
sense of danger and provoke the sympathy of fear. To add...

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...unable to carry the audience from a lower to a higher
pitch of interest and emotion....

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...her
surroundings. Hence the hot indignation of the reader when Balzac, after
having begun the _Duchesse...

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...mind if he miss a thousand qualities, so that he keeps
unflaggingly in pursuit of the...

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...as I contend. For in all
this excessive eagerness to be centrally human, is there...

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... Now no longer so, thank Heaven!...