New Arabian Nights

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1920 Chatto & Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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... ...

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...THE YOUNG MAN IN HOLY ORDERS ...

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...TELLS IN WHAT A STARTLING ...

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... OUT HIS THREAT
A LODGING FOR THE...

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...taken into the secret of
these adventures; the imperturbable courage of the one and the ready
invention...

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...ridicule of the transaction, I hope you will consider
honour satisfied and condescend. If not,...

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...the risk of my life I liquidate the
suspensory condition.”

With these words he crushed the nine...

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...every reason why I should not tell you my story. Perhaps that
is just the...

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... Now you know me as well as I
know myself: a fool, but consistent in...

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...a pocket-book tolerably well lined, and I need
not say how readily I should share my...

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...his eyes threw out a spark of light.

“You are the men for me!” he cried,...

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...it. For such as I, and for
all who desire to be out of the...

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...the young suicide with great humour and
gusto. He avoided the Colonel’s appealing looks without...

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...smoked placidly, leaning against a railing, until the young man
returned.

“Well,” he asked, “has our reception...

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... He was
dressed in light tweeds, with his neck very open in a striped shirt
collar;...

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...I am of myself, though he has more cogent reasons,”
answered Florizel, “but sure enough to...

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...opened, but much larger, and papered from top to bottom
with an imitation of oak wainscot....

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...of
such unusual power, that his eyes appeared through the glasses greatly
magnified and distorted in shape....

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...and then requested him to
take a seat upon his right.

“You are a new-comer,” he said,...

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... You doubtless remember the celebrated case, six months ago, of
the gentleman who was accidentally...

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...you—may I—may the—my
friend I mean—may any of us be pitched upon this evening as the...

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...happy young men!” he added.
“You have good eyes, and can follow the game. Alas!...

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...Death’s card had not come out.
The players held their respiration, and only breathed by gasps....

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...his fall may have been
occasioned by another seizure. The unhappy gentleman was well known...

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...at once.

“Your Highness,” he said, “may I be excused in my attendance this
afternoon? I...

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...or unmade,
should so greatly influence a young man’s spirit.”

“Attention, gentlemen!” said the President, and he...

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...said he, “and pleased to have been
in a position to do you this trifling service....

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...willing to march upon his doom, he was overjoyed to
yield to friendly violence, and return...

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...the lack of fortune shall receive employment and
remuneration from my officers. Those who suffer...

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...THE SARATOGA TRUNK


MR. SILAS Q. SCUDDAMORE was a young American of a simple and harmless
disposition,...

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...made his
acquaintance, and the pair would now and then dine together frugally in a
restaurant across...

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...if in answer to some reluctance or
opposition.

“I have studied his taste to a nicety, and...

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...notice than this riot of students
and counter-jumpers! See him where he sits, more like...

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...question is now one between my brother and myself,”
replied Geraldine, with a shade of offence...

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...about for a third time, and did not stop
until he had found a place of...

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...words. Hitherto I
was alone to suffer; now, poor boy, there will be two. ...

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...myself against intruders,” he said,
not without a little pique.

“That is how I should prefer the...

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...not care, in this house, to have lodgers who cannot meet
their liabilities.”

“What the devil do...

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...there was something there.

It was some seconds before he could move. Then, guided by...

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...closed
and double-locked it.

“Up!” he cried, addressing Silas in strident tones; “this is no time for
weeping....

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...look blacker than they are. I am old, and yet I never despair.”

“Can I...

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...the globe—in a word, a Saratoga trunk. Until this moment
I have never been able...

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...and prayer.

Late in the evening Dr. Noel entered the room carrying in his hand a...

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...you ask of me. But
be it so. I am now inured to humiliation;...

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...more lightly than I do your intellect. A time
will come, if you should be...

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...his
mind soon returned upon its gloomy preoccupations; for not even the
favour of a Prince to...

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... Would you like to leave your box?” he added.

“Dearly,” cried Silas; and the next...

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...the one to the other, at last
consented to withdraw.

For nearly two days the dead body...

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...the apartment. But at the next glance his eye fell
upon a person smoking in...

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...servants; and he was himself ushered into a room, where a man sat
warming himself before...

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...is a young man of my own suite, the brother of my
trusted friend; and it...

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...retreating carriage. And the same night he started by rail on his
return to Paris.

...

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...it seemed to him as if he could
walk for ever in that stimulating city atmosphere...

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...and Brackenbury could see a gentleman being admitted at
the front door and received by several...

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...off by the
way it came at the former break-neck velocity. Brackenbury shouted after
the man,...

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...lowering his
tone; “and believe me I am gratified to make your acquaintance. Your
looks accord...

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...into the ante-room, found a deep window recess concealed by
curtains of the fashionable green. ...

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...perhaps an hour the hansoms kept arriving with such frequency, that
Mr. Morris had to receive...

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...then, was Mr. Morris? What was his intention in thus playing the
householder for a...

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...pronounced the last words with an intonation which added to
their force; and his face wore...

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...me Morris no longer; call me, if you
please, Hammersmith; my real name, as well as...

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...I had received this order, to a furnishing contractor, and, in a
few hours, the house...

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...the laurel hedge. When the job is
done, we can cover it with a pile...

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...had been performed, “I wish, gentlemen,” he added, with the most
exquisite affability, “that I could...

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...and when the Prince rose to his feet, it was impossible to
distinguish his features or...

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...as the lamp had kindled, the party beheld an
unaccustomed sternness on the Prince’s features. ...

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...since he was captured and disarmed the President
raised his head, and it was plain that...

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...come,
and the birds were piping in the shrubbery and on the forest trees of the
garden....

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...one for me; and I await my
own turn with deadly apprehension.”

“What was I saying?” cried...

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...caressing manners. But when all is said, he was
not the man to lead armaments...

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...which, in his own heart, he dubbed by a more emphatic name.

Immediately after he had...

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...on the top of the piano. Lady Vandeleur, at the other end of the
apartment,...

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... Sir Thomas would make the
saddest disturbance; and if you only knew how weary I...

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...you. If he had as much as the rudiments of
honesty, he would scorn to...

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...this sultry day there was every chance that his
complexion would suffer severely; and to walk...

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...away all my appetite for
the other members of her family.”

“And do you fancy, General Vandeleur,”...

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...the wife of one
and the sister of the other of these gladiators, his heart was...

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...eyes.

“This is the parcel from Lady Vandeleur,” said Harry.

“I know,” replied the maid, with a...

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...glimpse of the delinquent secretary, his purpose changed, his
anger flowed into a new channel, and...

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...lane. But,” she added, checking him, for he had got upon his
feet immediately on...

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...for his escape.

Alas! as he came abreast of a garden door under a tuft of...

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...in odd contrast to the grounds, it was crazy, ill-kept,
and of a mean appearance. ...

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...as I now
perceive, can be led into suspicious positions.”

“My little man,” replied the gardener, “I...

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...by his spirits,
and with a broken voice repeated his last ejaculation—“I am lost!”

The gardener peered...

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...regret to observe that you have had a fall.”

And he offered his hand.

A sort of...

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...for I declare I have not the heart to
shave you so close. So, do...

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...nothing but the roadway
and the doorsteps of the houses, pushed him violently before him down...

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...the maid with a movement of his arms,
swept up a double handful of the diamonds,...

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...and ring; and Nature might
have still so far prevailed that I could have forgiven you...

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...the
subsequent investigations_, _he was even complemented by one of the
chiefs of the detective department on...

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...eyes met those of Mr. Rolles. The
nurseryman seemed disconcerted, and even alarmed; and immediately...

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...so imposing a fetish. The beauty of the stone
flattered the young clergyman’s eyes; the...

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...immediately after took his leave.

Mr. Rolles regained his apartment. It seemed smaller and barer...

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...added, “I do not mean Thackeray’s novels; but the crimes and
secret possibilities of our society,...

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...to divide and sufficiently cunning to dispose with advantage of
the Rajah’s Diamond. That done,...

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...many different
habits and dexterities. His features were bold and aquiline; his
expression arrogant and predatory;...

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...hand them about among the common sort of
men is to set a price on Virtue’s...

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...present
journey he had taken a sofa in the sleeping carriage.

“You will be very comfortable,” said...

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...the
young clergyman. His last thought was of his terrifying neighbour.

When he awoke it was...

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...had at once withdrawn.

The clergyman leaped to his feet. The extreme of terror had...

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...emerald in the centre; there
were the interlacing crescents; and there were the pear-shaped pendants,
each a...

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...the worst of
fools. Perhaps,” he continued, leaning back upon his seat, “perhaps you
would oblige...

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...please, you may accompany me thither. And before the end
of a month I believe...

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...of business. A person, who
must remain nameless, but of whom the lawyer had every...

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...whom this invisible person
chooses to propose?”

“I was to assure you that suitability of age and...

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...he discovered in his heart an invincible repugnance to the
name of Scrymgeour, which he had...

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...in the neighbourhood, until at length,
recognising the folly of continued search, he started on a...

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...returned Vandeleur. “Two can
play at that. My brother is here in Paris; the...

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...offering unfurnished lodgings by
the month; and, on inquiry, the room which commanded the Dictator’s
garden proved...

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...of locks being opened and bars removed, and to see Mr.
Vandeleur, carrying a lantern and...

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...not only highly excited by this incident,
but his spirits were improved to a still more...

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...truth, there must be
a fine show behind those shutters.”

By an early hour on Sunday Francis...

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...he was, in impotent
anxiety.

At last the act came to an end. The curtain fell,...

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...the
meanest toilette. Even her basket, so aptly did she carry it, became her
like an...

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...with his Euclid for that
forenoon, and was more often at the window than at his...

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...word. “Francis
Vandeleur, I tell you.”

The Dictator made a movement of his whole body, half...

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...and they were talking together like a
pair of school companions.

At length Miss Vandeleur made her...

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...were to offer an unnecessary warning? Or
again, if it were serious, the criminal might...

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...view. A great crime had been committed; a great
calamity had fallen upon the inhabitants...

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...Mr. Vandeleur, and he laughed aloud

“I see,” cried he. “It is the Scrymgeour. ...

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...my father’s harsh expressions. I felt no disgust for
you; on the contrary, I asked...

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...my keepsake
until you are in a place of safety.”

“I promise,” replied Francis.

She put something loosely...

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...sore both in body and mind—the one was all
bruised, the other was full of smarting...

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...in gilt, which opened
by means of a spring, and disclosed to the horrified young man...

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...a respectful bow, as of a man
silently apologising to his equal; and Francis felt relieved...

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...made a grateful reverence to the
Prince, who bade him resume his seat.

“I thank you,” said...

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...house and opened the door of the _salon_. Two
people were seated there; one was...

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...“has called Mr. Scrymgeour his
friend. Believe me, had I known he was thus honoured,...

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...DIAMOND. _That last link in the chain is
known among the inhabitants of Bagdad by...

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...oftener, I shall begin
to grow covetous myself.”

At last, though still uncertain in his mind, he...

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...answer. Let me remind you, officer, that this is an affair of
some gravity.”

“Your Highness,”...

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...temptation!” cried the detective.

“I applaud your answer,” returned the Prince. “It is that of...

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...be
defeated and massacred by thousands. In the end, he had amassed a
magnificent fortune, and...

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...a smile, “that many well-to-do people
in this city might envy you your ruin.”

“Alas! your Highness!”...

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...that we were only sulky fellows. It was scarcely a
companionship, but a coexistence in...

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...nor relations, I was troubled
with no correspondence, and had nothing in the nature of headquarters,
unless...

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...beating to windward on the horizon, and a huge truncheon of wreck
half buried in the...

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...of the den not only concealed the
light of my fire, but sheltered me from the...

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...with genuine satisfaction that I
found myself safely back beside the fire. I had escaped...

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...old bedroom, completed their burglarious
entry.

I followed what I supposed was their example; and, getting on...

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...they would probably come ashore after
dark; not only because that was of a piece with...

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...closed, I could see a glimmer going
to and fro about the house; and a gush...

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...I thought
myself dull not to have perceived it from the first.

While I was thus reflecting,...

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...and courage; but you had only to look at him,
even in his most amiable moment,...

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...in half a gale of wind, and with the
floe scarce covered? Why had he...

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...While I was thus
busied, I mentally declared war against Northmour and his mystery. I...

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...seen abundant reason to
doubt the friendliness of their relation. Although I could hear nothing
of...

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...without
satisfaction that I recognised my own handiwork in a great cut under his
right eye, and...

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...intentness. Then she broke out—

“You have an honest face. Be honest like your...

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... It was true, let me cudgel my imagination as I
pleased, that I could invent...

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...some risk.”

She only looked at me reproachfully.

“You and your father—” I resumed; but she interrupted...

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...was
she who first tore her hand away, and, forgetting all about her request
and the promise...

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...yet much
timidity on either side. When she had once more spoken about my
danger—and that,...

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...Pacific, and it was in Northmour’s yacht, the _Red Earl_, that he
designed to go. ...

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...man, but simply because he is infatuated with a charming English
woman.”

She reminded me of his...

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...victims; so complete already was the empire of my love for
my wife. A price...

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...black-avised fellow wi’ the teeth? Was he an
I-talian? Weel, yon’s the first that...

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...those in the pavilion who
had recently passed that way. Not only so; but from...

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...and yet I admit that I was heartily afraid; and it was
with a sensible reluctance...

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...the gale
so loud that my hearing was as useless as my sight.

For the rest of...

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...hands
were on my shoulders and my lips upon her mouth. Yet up to that...

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...where the devil Mr. Cassilis
comes from, and what the devil Mr. Cassilis is doing here....

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...a great deal, and sometimes, I think, very foolishly,”
replied Clara, “but I know you are...

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...whole wasp’s nest is after
Huddlestone. We shall all be lucky if we can save...

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...preparations for defence.

“We could stand a siege,” I said at length.

“Ye-es,” drawled Northmour; “a very...

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...quicksand, but reminded
Northmour that our enemies had spared me in the wood.

“Do not flatter yourself,”...

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...by his appearance, and the wheedling, unreal tones in which he
spoke.

“Cassilis is a good man,”...

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...it up to them?”

“Ah!” replied he, shaking his head, “I have tried that already, Mr.
Cassilis;...

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...“do with me or my money what you will. I leave
all in your hands....

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...of waiting. Moreover, as we were
both convinced that the hollows of the links were...

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...might
have lain hidden in as many square yards about my path. But I had...

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...said he. “I am not a swindler, and I guard
myself; that is all. ...

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...very noble human beings to perish in defence of a thieving
banker.

Before we sat down to...

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...threw his head in the air; his eyelids quivered; next
moment he fell insensible below the...

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...recalled me to myself.

“An air-gun,” he said. “They wish to make no noise.”

I put...

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...stood motionless, his
face uplifted to ours, and a rag of something white on his extended...

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...anything to interfere, he had rudely embraced and
repeatedly kissed the resisting girl. Next moment...

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...a firm hold already on the outhouse, which blazed higher and
higher every moment; the back...

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...the meantime,
Clara, who was dead white but still possessed her faculties, had
displaced the barricade from...

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...with Northmour,
now scuffling confusedly for the possession of that dear burden. Why we
should have...

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...my life, though, as my wife used to say, I knew that my
kisses would be...

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...in my encampment; and, broken as she was by the
excitement and the hideous catastrophe of...

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... “Would you like to take her to Graden
House?”

“Thank you,” replied I; “I shall try...

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...of wine in honour of the jest and the grimaces with which it was
accompanied, and...

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...the firelight only
escaped on either side of his broad person, and in a little pool...

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...and
sometimes raised its voice in a victorious whoop, and made sepulchral
grumblings in the chimney. ...

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...on his back, as
people say, in terrifying nursery metaphor; and he breathed hard under
the gruesome...

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... Then he pocketed
his share of the spoil, and executed a shuffle with his feet...

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...below the
twinkling stars. Villon cursed his fortune. Would it were still
snowing! Now,...

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...woman, and she dead. He
knelt beside her to make sure upon this latter point....

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...same purse, so dearly earned, so
foolishly departed! Villon stood and cursed; he threw the...

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...and bade him be
off to hell, where he came from.

“My hands are blue to the...

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...at least he had
confused his trail; for he was still possessed with the idea of...

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...looked as if it might be easily broken into,
and thither he betook himself promptly, entertaining...

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...surrounded with delicate markings, and the whole face
based upon a thick white beard, boldly and...

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...have
risked it. A fine house, and a fine old master, so help me all...

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...a little put out
when I think of it,” he went on. “I knew him—damn...

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...the burgher bites his nails to buy them wine
and wood. I have seen a...

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...been groping for
farthings in the snow? Should not I have been the soldier, and...

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...you leave me the poor scholar Francis Villon,
without a farthing, why, of course, I remain...

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...desire them more, and suffer more sharply for their
absence. I speak to you as...

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...has come, and the night-bird should be
off to his roost. Will you go before,...

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...sky. As the night
fell the wind rose, and began to hoot under archways and...

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...of an embrasure, into the valley lying dark
and formless several hundred feet below. Denis...

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...beat a retreat, his foot rolled upon a
pebble; he fell against the wall with an...

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...the edges and pulled, but the mass was immovable. He shook it, it
was as...

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...dealing with something
tangible; at least he would be no longer in the dark. He...

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...seemed ironical and treacherous, it fitted so
poorly with his looks.

Such was Alain, Sire de Malétroit.

Denis...

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...be but one
person engaged, sometimes two; and the vehemence of the voice, low as it
was,...

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...madman. And if the
old gentleman was sane, what, in God’s name, had he to...

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...the Sire, in his most flute-like tones, “I have brought a
friend to see you, my...

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...will stab myself rather than
be forced on that young man. The heart rises at...

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...my head aches!” she said wearily—“to say nothing of my poor
heart! But it is...

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...truly I had not looked
for such a shameful punishment as this! I could not...

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...should
not refuse the hand of a Malétroit with impunity—not if she had been as
common as...

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...You will not
disfigure your last hours by a want of politeness to a lady?”

Denis looked...

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...a thousand
times over, and buried in the nastiest kitchen-heap in France. His eyes
wandered round...

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...you. Your uncle is a disgrace to mankind. Believe me, madam,
there is no...

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...he rides into town
before his company; he receives many assurances of trust and
regard—sometimes by express...

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...in
his own esteem; and we women would prize nothing more dearly.”

“You are very good,” he...

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...with a bit of a shiver. He had taken her
hand, and retained it in...

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...curls upon his brow,
and his feet shod through all weathers in the slenderest of Molière
shoes—you...

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...walked in different worlds, yet
continued to walk hand in hand.

It chanced one day that Monsieur...

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...a surprising stroke of fortune they
might have been lying there in pawn until this day....

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...business. To-night I
give a trifling musical entertainment at the Café of the Triumphs of...

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...her coldly. Here and there a single
halfpenny was forthcoming; the net result of a...

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... “Permit me to remind you—”

“Come, come, sir!” said the Commissary, “I desire no explanations.”

“I...

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...of music as
retailed by the Berthelinis, had no hesitation whatever as to the rights
of the...

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...made into a
bundle with the music; the guitar was stowed into the fat guitar-case;
and Elvira...

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...well, then—you detain my baggage,” concluded Léon. “You shall
smart for this. I will...

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...Head.”

And he set out to find the Maire’s. It took him some ten minutes
wandering...

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...of Castel-le-Gâchis thrilled at this audacious innovation.
Hitherto had the night been sacred to repose and...

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...it now!”

And taking the guitar in one hand and the case in the other, he...

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...waiting an answer he began to strum the symphony. The first
chords awoke a young...

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...artist than her husband. She also is a creator; she created
nearly twenty successful songs...

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...in the dim
starshine, “and I rather like the play, and music, and guitars, and
things.”

Léon had...

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...went by; then the church clock
struck two, and many domestic clocks followed or preceded it...

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...had not deceived him, for the male voice broke forth
instantly in a towering passion.

The undergraduate,...

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...for a
chorus. That is one of the best features of the heavenly bodies, that
they...

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...indistinctly behind Monsieur her husband, and
whose face speaks eloquently of a well-regulated mind. Ah!...

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...as bitterly as
ever. The talk wandered from this to that subject—for with one accord
the...

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...prevent the consequences.
Picture to yourself, Monsieur and Madame,” she went on, for she passed
Stubbs over,...

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...might two philosophers salute, as at the end of a laborious
life each recognised that he...

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...in and out of her soul with every
note; it was a piece of her youth...

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... ...