Prince Otto, a Romance

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1905 edition by David Price, email ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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...seemed indissoluble from the green garden in
which it stood, and that yet was a sea-traveller...

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... R. L....

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...precise year of grace in which this tale begins shall be left to the
conjecture of...

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...music: 'The Invitation to the Road'; an air continually
sounding in the ears of gipsies, and...

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...night fell upon the Prince while he was threading green tracks in the
lower valleys of...

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...leagues to either, and the road excellent;
but there is not a wine bush, not a...

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...swing me an axe over his head that many a man of
Gerolstein could hardly lift;...

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...natural and simple; but the prince's is both
artificial and complicated. It is easy to...

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...all great at wrestling in these parts, and it's so that we
generally settle our disputes....

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...name to live by; he should have got a wife and a blessing on his
marriage;...

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...but
whoever may complain, I humbly conceive, sir, that this Otto cannot.
What he has worked for,...

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...out!' cried Fritz. 'He is! He is to lay by his title as
soon...

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...coming day, composed and fortified his
spirits; and the Prince, breathing deep and pausing as he...

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...arose early
and was in a dream.'

'O, sir!' she cried, 'I wish to beg of you...

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...never!' cried 'Ottilia. 'Is that how you do? Well, you would never
be a...

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...must go.'

'Go, my dear, and I need not bid you go in peace, for I...

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...is, as one
may say, their seed-time. And this is a damp cold corner for...

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...his sympathies. Every man loves in his soul to play
the part of the stage...

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...be ready.
Let us meet, if you please, in Mittwalden, at the "Morning Star."'

'I am, in...

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...doings were so curiously examined, you might find it
inconvenient to reply.'

'These are all set-offs,' said...

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...to buy the farm, I suppose there would naturally be an end.'

'To be sure,' said...

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...the imprint of a Phoenix and the
legend _Libertas_. 'And so now you see you...

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...few congregated roofs, or perhaps above him, on a
shoulder, the solitary cabin of a woodman....

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...You'll ride with me incog. and set
me talking! But if I know you, you'll...

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...of men--for you are a great body--fifteen thousand, I have
heard, but that will be understated;...

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...reined up and, clumsily enough, saluted.

'You will observe, I have not asked your name,' said...

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...ideas is, believe me, past, or at least passing.'

'When I look about me--' began Otto.

'When...

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...certain party of wood-merchants from various
states of the empire, who had been drinking together somewhat...

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...own home garden, where the
small stables opened, over a bridge, upon the park. The...

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...night's cavern arch the shrubs
obscurely bustled. Through the plotted terraces and down the marble
stairs...

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...half a day, when he was married; he had never
envied him his throne.

Reading was not...

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... The names of virtues exercise a charm on most of us;
we must lay claim...

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...this hour, must I not go forth to meet the inevitable?
should I not save these...

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... And the
people sick at the folly of it, and fired with the injustice! ...

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... And it was the same thing in my marriage,' he added more
hoarsely. 'I...

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...Otto. 'Approach the facts.'

'The routine of business was proceeded with,' replied the official, now
visibly...

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...an agent; I had no status to prevent the measure.'

'This man, my guest, has been...

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... The Herr Doctor might perhaps be asked
for his advice; but we have no _index...

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...I; but I have seen no reason to regret my visit. The
spectacle of this...

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...Amalia Seraphina, a daughter of the Grand-Ducal house of
Toggenburg-Tannhauser, would be equally inconsiderable if she...

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...of
Mittwalden; nor do I myself regard it as entirely desperate. The
margravate of Brandenburg has...

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...it
for ourselves; and the republic will be all the stronger to resist, if
the kings of...

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...of
ingratiation, and can be all things to all men. Hence there has probably
sprung up...

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...'This man,' he said, 'is
a devil. A filthy imagination, an ear greedy of evil,...

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...my hand, you
have been received under my roof. When did I fail you in...

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...have met inhospitable usage.'

'Well, there will be no English war,' returned Sir John.

'Nay, sir,' said...

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...for
a wager.

'Sir,' said the Prince at length, turning towards the Englishman, 'you
are to me, except...

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...the eyes
of spies. We, on our side, have but one weapon--truth.'

'Truth!' echoed the Prince,...

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...speak?--you know better than I do, he is
not alone in Grunewald.'

'There is a deal in...

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...the lady. 'Your Highness plays
like an angel.'

'You must be right, madam; who could speak...

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...kiss your hand?' she added.

'Madam, it is I who must kiss yours.' And Otto...

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...alchemist that makes the
transmutation. They have been everywhere together since you left,' she
continued, brightening...

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...now,' she said, 'may I dismiss my
sovereign? This is rebellion and a _cas pendable_;...

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...set perhaps a
higher value on his evident desire to please. His face was marked...

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...Baron, with a touch of ill-humour. 'Is
the dog defeated by the hare? Our...

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...head and sent us forward.
Courage? I wonder when I hear you!'

'My Princess is unlike...

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...I am still ignorant of our
line of battle. Come, co-admiral, let us consult. ....

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...had presumed, but held to his point bravely. 'Madam,' he
said, 'if, as you say,...

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...that he dismissed the attendant who had brought him in.

'You make yourself at home, _chez...

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...always had some claim to
taste; I could tell live happiness from dull routine; and between
hunting,...

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...unfamiliar softnesses, moving within her. 'What would you be
at?' she added, hardening her voice.

'I...

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...return to
make me a scene of conjugal reproaches--the grocer and his wife! The
positions are...

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...us here,' said Otto.

The next stage was a gallery of pictures, where Seraphina's portrait hung
conspicuous,...

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...was laughable, even
to himself; and he laughed aloud in his wrath. Upon this mood...

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...valet, repaired the disorder of his
appearance with elaborate care; and then, curled and scented and...

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...regret, is still absent from the board,' replied
the Doctor calmly; and he resumed the perusal...

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...of
offending, would have perhaps done better to begin with an explanation.
The resources of the state...

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...non-combatants, eager to trim, volunteered an answer. 'The
Herr Doctor von Hohenstockwitz had just entered...

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...to be aware that yours is the more authoritative information.'

'I am honoured by this expression...

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...then lay our heads together,' said the Prince, 'and devise some
honourable means of safety.'

Up to...

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...in yourself they are obeyed. What are you?
What have you to do in this...

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... Ay, that was princely!' He paused.
'It was a thing to see. I...

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...our policy, weighing every step, how
often have I had to admire your perspicacity, your man-like...

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...conceive more
worthily of your responsibilities. I am with you in the thought; and in
the...

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...Thursday he returned; all is usual in that. Meanwhile the
war proceeds; our Prince will...

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...Baron.

'Excellent,' she said. 'My door is always open to you, Baron. As soon
as...

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...even as he
worked, and worked wisely and well, over the hated details of his
principality, he...

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...gallery and beheld his wife, the Chancellor's abstract flatteries
fell from him like rain, and he...

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...put it in another way,' returned Otto. 'Did you ever steal?'

'Often!' cried the Countess....

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...corn-stealer,'
returned the Prince. 'It was in a professional capacity--'

'Like me! Flatterer!' she cried....

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...of the stars. The night was warm and windless. A
shaving of new moon...

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...with the
last of his endurance, laid the bag upon the ground, threw himself upon
the bench,...

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...love
your honour, and I swore to myself that I should save it in your teeth.
I...

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...an empty scruple; and now you are ashamed of it! You have
made your friend...

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...You know you had lost your head.
Well, so had I. Come now, do not...

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...he had done something generous. It
was a desperate stroke to re-enter at the point...

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...calling you a gentleman, many a good day's work you have
done, I doubt not, but...

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...a man capably doing evil than
blundering about good.'

Otto was still silent, in extreme dudgeon.

Presently the...

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...was it
different? But I own I admired her at the council. When she...

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...peace. It will not be you; it never can be
you:--you, who can do nothing,...

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...Gotthold, leaping up. 'Because I ask you
how you came by certain moneys, and because...

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...other end of that long garden, and back to back with the villa of
the Countess,...

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...and I shall cease to fetch and carry for the Princess Ratafia.
Yes, 'tis done. ...

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... But
what am I?' she cried; 'I, whom you deceive!'

'Jealousy!' cried Gondremark. 'Anna, I...

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...my best I must possess
the paper. Where shall I find Gordon? In his...

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...paper in your pocket, who knows what you would do with
it?--not you, at least--nor I....

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...colour, a yellow rose in the bosom;
and the instant picture was complete.

'That will do,' she...

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...be persuaded to reply; and the Countess kissed him
lightly, gave him the florin, set him...

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...she began immediately to
enter into the spirit of her part; and as soon as they...

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...like a
trapped weasel? No, madam; signify to those who sent you my readiness to
go....

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...lady to whom I am indebted for such kindnesses,'
returned the Prince. 'But this is...

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...a wonderful persuader. And I thank God, I can still
offer you the fair equivalent.'...

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...leave-taking, I shall
immediately hasten to keep tryst. To-night I shall not meet so dangerous
a...

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...be
prepared to meet me.'

'Herr Gordon, I believe?' said Otto.

'Herr Oberst Gordon,' replied that officer. ...

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...Prince was gone.

Madame von Rosen consulted her watch. She had still, she thought, time
enough...

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...her fan as she
spoke. Quick as her pulses beat, the fan waved languidly. ...

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...hear and look upon. 'I will
tell you one of the things,' she said, 'that...

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...the Prince, and perhaps even to yourself, among the number,' replied
the Princess, with dignity. ...

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... ...

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...leave me. I thank you, I am sure, but I shall be obliged if...

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...we are now separate for ever; by your own act, you
free...

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...beheld herself unpitiably
martyred, one door stood open. At any cost, through any stress of
suffering,...

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... 'Are you true to me? are you false? Look in your heart
and answer:...

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...and drooped. She had scarce time to fear his murderous
onslaught ere he fell before...

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...the liberty, your Highness, for one moment, of
addressing you as a daughter, a loved although...

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...here.'

Once she was alone she ran to the Baron, and with a sickening heart
sought to...

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... The litter had passed
forth between the iron gates and entered on the streets of...

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...cries and loud footing of the mob drew nearer the
doomed palace; the rush was like...

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...of man's
nature and fate.

There sat the Princess, beautifully looking upon beauty, in council with
these glad...

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...and faces. She strangled and fled before her fears. And yet in
the last...

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...of heaven
blinked down upon that wandering Princess; and the honest brook had no
words but to...

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...sun had floated up; and
her startled eyes received day's first arrow, and quailed under the
buffet....

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...by a brook which made a
series of inconsiderable falls; and on the threshold the Princess...

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...man found his tongue. 'I must have more than that,' said
he.

'It is all I...

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...the
floor was paved with the pine needles; and the pines themselves, whose
roots made promontories, looked...

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...her locks, and with terror
dogging her, and her whole bosom sick with grief, resumed her...

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...the flush of slumber became her like a
flower.

'Upon my word,' he thought, 'I did not...

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...the benefit of being formed in your employment--a
footman, am I right?--and our old friend the...

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...she contemned; she had none of Otto's
eagerness to be approved, but went her own way...

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...scandal.'

'I thank you,' she said, quivering. 'This is very true. Will you stop
the...

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...Otto, to explain all, to ask pity upon her
knees for her transgressions, and, if all...

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...spem reducis_--how does it go, Doctor?' he asked gaily.
'I am, in a sense, your host;...

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...And as for this matter of forgiveness,
it comes, sir, of loose views and (what is...

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...deliquium of
deadly weaknesses within?'

'I? yes,' said Otto; 'but you, Gotthold--you, with your interminable
industry, your keen...

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...hand, the lamp-light skimmed the face of
the precipices, and the dwarf pine-trees twinkled with all...

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...release fairly
burned her meddling fingers.

All things considered, the next day beheld an elegant and beautiful...

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...sign, was flung wide open, and she swam into the Prince's
sight, bright-eyed, and with her...

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...threw the order on the floor.

'There!' she cried. 'I forced it from her. ...

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...I will content him.
And you, the fairy of our pantomime, shall have the credit.'

'Done!' she...

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...a relic; no more
suitable offering, although I say it, could be made. "_Dieux de l'immense
plaine...

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...on
theirs, advanced with somewhat quicker steps. They met at the re-entrant
angle, where a thin...

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...he
began to see himself once more intruding, profiting, perhaps, by her
misfortune, and now that she...

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...Job and merely a man and a woman--let me conjure you
to forgive the weakness and...

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...rafted-down the goodlier timber of the
forest; and on these rough clearings it now set and...

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...wine without here, you will give a pleasure and a
service, both in one.'

The miller once...

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...sit down, and himself sat down
beside her on the slope of an inconsiderable mound.

She sat...

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...transforming currents.

'Seraphina,' he cried, 'O, forget the past! Let me serve and help you;
let...

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...bassoon. His character is there
drawn at large; and the sympathy of Landor has countersigned...

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...Baroness Gondremark--he a man who once made a
noise--she still beautiful--both witty. She complimented me...