Tales and Fantasies

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1905 Chatto & Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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...IN WHICH JOHN REAPS THE WHIRLWIND ...

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... I. INTRODUCES THE ADMIRAL ...

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...he are now
sprawling in Parliament, and lauding themselves as the authors of their
own distinction. ...

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...thirty, and left him with three children: a
daughter two years, and a son about eight...

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...from his father’s office, where he was studying the practice
of the law. It was...

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...trenchant voice, and trembled, and then
dodged the thought. After all, who was to know?...

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...if you lacked that qualification, and were an
hungered, or inclined toward conviviality at unlawful hours,...

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...on with a kind and
ironical smile. John had read the significance of that smile,...

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... At that
juncture a certain creasing in his greatcoat caught his ear. He put...

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...evil hour he penetrated
into the somewhat unsavoury interior. Alan, to be sure, was there,
seated...

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...remarkable what bright prospects were just then in
the very act of opening before each of...

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...with
that sour, inquisitive expression that came so near to smiling and was so
different in effect.

‘This...

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...father and son.

It was broken by Mr. Nicholson picking up the pawn-ticket: ‘John Froggs,
85 Pleasance,’...

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...of me? Oh! I wish, I wish that I had known; but you...

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...sinner in suspense, unpunished, unforgiven. And
at the very touch of criticism, the paternal sanctity...

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...second psalm, he durst not even make a packet of a change
of clothes. Attired...

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...young man was the nephew of one of the Nob Hill
magnates, who run the San...

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...an instant restitution of the money
he had stolen or (as he preferred to call it)...

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...he was too hopeful to be
stayed, silenced the voice of warning in his bosom, and...

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...the bank in Edinburgh, for which place
it was understood that John had armed himself with...

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...meal the
reassembled family were to sit roseate, and the best wine, the modern
fatted calf, should...

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...on Regent Terrace;
there was nothing to prevent him going round the end of the hill,...

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...first appearance in the family pew; his first
visit to his uncle Greig, who thought himself...

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...of the dining-room where the cloth was being laid, and the three
windows of the drawing-room...

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...caught the eye of his son, a
strange commotion and a dark flush sprung into his...

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...he did or where he went; and in
the general crashing hurry of his nerves, unconscious...

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...large a garden as to be well out of cry; on all other
sides, open fields...

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...inscrutable; and John’s dizzy brain rocked
with the shadow. Yet even so, it struck him...

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...little, and looking about him at the
swaying shadows, the flitting sparkles, and the steady stars...

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...it was day. The low winter sun was already in the
heavens, but his watch...

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...whole windless world of air
hung over him entranced, and the stillness weighed upon his mind...

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...had a discomfortable air. The chairs were scattered, and one had
been overthrown; the table-cloth,...

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...he to remember—he, who had not a thought to spare—that he
was himself the author, as...

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...it down to
rest before he reached the gate; and when he had come so far,...

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...ever with the
Lodge; and the further he must go to find a cab, the greater...

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...I’ve driven the fam’ly for years. I drove a cab at his
father’s waddin’. ...

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...brief as they had appeared, must
have occupied him longer than he supposed, and there was...

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...perhaps might
hang or save him! There was no time to be lost; he durst...

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...tortures of sorrow and alarm, and been partly
tipsy; and though it was impossible to say...

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...in front, showed him his destination—now standing
solitary in the low sunshine, with the sparrows hopping...

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...that guided it—first do that; do that, at
least; do that at once.

And just then the...

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...uttered, with no conscious purpose formed in his
will, John whipped about, tumbled over the roadside...

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...wits, suggested another; and he
plodded off toward Craigleith. A wind had sprung up out...

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...muddy pool, by which the vaqueros
had encamped: splendid sun over all, the big bonfire blazing,...

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...then rose again and wandered further; and at last,
like a transformation scene, behold him in...

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...cry, and stood staring. She was a
large woman, strong, calm, a little masculine, her...

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...are no philosophers, and behold the concrete
only. And women, such as she, are very...

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...need
arose; and how she was thus doubly welcome as an old friend first, and
then as...

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...the other thing.
That’s serious.’

‘Is that what my father spoke about?’ asked John. ‘I don’t...

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...know, you see, and they ought
to know through John; and I can tell them some...

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...ten years ago, tapping at the door. The winter sunrise
was painting the east; and...

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... By five
minutes before the half-hour you must be at table, in your old seat,
under...

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...asked the father.

‘Last night, sir, after you were asleep,’ was the reply.

‘It’s most extraordinary,’ said...

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...transcended comment. The return of the
change, which the old gentleman still carried in his...

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...it was possible that Alexander
might rebel.

‘Hum!’ said Mr. Nicholson, and put his hand, limp and...

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...quite mad, and instead of going to prison, had gone to
Morningside Asylum. The murdered...

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...George, his absence from church, his old, crapulous,
disreputable vices, were all things of course in...

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...looks younger than you.’

‘He is older, though; years older. But,’ with a slap upon...

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...on the fourth step, as though the
familiarity of the address surprised and somewhat shocked his...

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... The presence of so many
witnesses decided him at once to flee. He crouched...

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...narrate to
you the following foul and unnatural events.

In his young days Fettes studied medicine in...

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...burden, pay them their sordid price, and remain
alone, when they were gone, with the unfriendly...

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...immoral and too categorical to the
unguarded counsels of his master. He understood his duty,...

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...sore perplexity, determined to wait
for the advice of his immediate superior, the class assistant.

This was...

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...that is what K— would look for at our
hands. The question is, Why did...

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...liquors singing in his
head, returned home with devious footsteps and a mind entirely in
abeyance. ...

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...gently but firmly on the other’s shoulder.

‘Richardson,’ said he, ‘may have the head.’

Now Richardson was...

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...to oblige you.’

‘To oblige me?’ cried Wolfe. ‘Oh, come! You did, as near...

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...the members of the unhappy Gray
were dealt out to one and to another, and received...

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...Resurrection Man—to use a byname of the period—was not
to be deterred by any of the...

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...window, the cold, incongruous
work that lay before them, added zest to their enjoyment of the...

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...part it was at a foot pace, and almost
groping, that they picked their way through...

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...upon the other. At every
repetition of the horrid contact each instinctively repelled it with...

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...a woman,’ said Macfarlane, in a hushed voice.

‘It was a woman when we put her...

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... When we love, by
some noble method of our own or some nobility of mien...

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...the transaction.

Among resident artists he enjoyed celebrity of a non-professional sort.
He had spent more money—no...

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...Nothing remains but the
_coup d’œil_, the contemplative man’s enjoyment, Mr. —,’ and he paused
for the...

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...Van Tromp for guide. Yet he was a guide of no mean order, who...

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...him. ‘The thing’s right,’ he would
say, or ‘the thing’s wrong’; and there was an...

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...cut
Richard to the heart. The latter drew slighting comparisons, and
remembered that he was the...

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...he will to his hired vassals, but (as the Scotch
say)—

...

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...in his heart, and murmuring ‘Good morning,’ he
made his escape into the street.

His horse was...

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...remained
graven in his memory.



CHAPTER III—IN THE ADMIRAL’S NAME


THERE was no return to the subject. ...

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...we conceive our mistress is as a composite thing,
principally petticoats. But humanity has triumphed...

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...are very nice.’

She laughed aloud. ‘Nice?’ she repeated. ‘I see you don’t care...

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...like is he? What did ye say
was his name?’

She was dead silent, and stared...

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...of him?’ she repeated, with a
different scansion, as Richard, who had not much taste for...

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...people exaggerated the
difficulty of life. A little steering, just a touch of the rudder...

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...each other,
we might marry when we pleased. But I fear, darling, we may have...

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...you
despair of a hearing, until the thing rides you like a nightmare, until
you almost hate...

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...But alas!
the Squire was sick and peevish; he had been all day glooming over Dick’s
estrangement—for...

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...planted him face to face with Mr. Van Tromp, in a suit of French
country velveteens...

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...of Richard.

And, in the meantime, Van Tromp ran on interminably.

‘I never forget a friend,’ said...

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...do not know that you are wanted,’ she cried, leaning on his shoulder
with a caress....

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...and thirsty.

‘Is that,’ he asked, pointing with his stick, ‘an inn?’

There was a marked change...

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...the
selfishness of a man who had obtruded his dark looks and passionate
language on her joy;...

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...scene was in the heart of Esther, shut away from all
eyes. Had this warm,...

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...he said frankly. ‘I was spoiled when a child. As
for you, Esther, you...

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...us—let us go back to the “Trevanion Arms” and talk this matter out
over a bottle.’

‘Certainly...

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...as to the
manner born; and his appearance, as he intended it should, attracted some
attention among...

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...though you didn’t see me. And I saw a
devilish pretty woman, by Gad. ...

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...his daughter, ‘shall go to bed; and you and I will keep
it up till all’s...

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...floor startled his heart into his mouth; but the
silence which had thus been disturbed settled...

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...dark.

Dick was left once more alone to darkness and to that dulled and dogged
state of...

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...manner and
voice, exercise a double influence on the hearer’s mind. Dick was
confounded; he recovered...

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... I only asked information; I only urged you
to consider; and I still urge and...

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...said; and descended the winding footpath to
the margin.

There she drank greedily in her hands and...

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...at some chickens in the corner of the yard. Master
Richard himself, thought the groom,...

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...or nourished a grudge
against him.

‘Then you don’t love me?’ he said, drawing back from her,...

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...last. You were laughing at my folly,
playing with me like a child, at the...

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...retorted. ‘I will not, to please you for
a moment, make both of us unhappy...

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...the chimney; the flowers
in the garden, the hawthorn in the lane, hung down their heads...

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...to other shoulders, suggested that perhaps the master had better
inquire further from George the stableman...

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...composed himself with some pomp, answered the loud rattle of the
riding-whip upon the door with...

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...matter of that; I might ask
you where she was, and what would you say to...

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...returned Van Tromp.

‘Dick!’ cried his father, suddenly breaking forth, ‘it is not too late,
is it?...

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...lane. Esther had not made a sign throughout
the interview, and still kept silence now...

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...shall stay in the meantime! and—well, and do something
practical—advertise for a situation as private secretary—and...

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...that the house was not his to dispose of,
that being a class of considerations to...

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...in a few hours, and as fond mankind loves to hope,
for ever. Many long...

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...away,’ suggested Van Tromp.

‘I had not ventured to propose it,’ replied the Squire. ‘_Les
convenances_,...