The Black Arrow: A Tale of the Two Roses

By Robert Louis

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...THE BLACK ARROW

A TALE OF THE TWO ROSES


ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON



ILLUSTRATED BY N. C. WYETH

[Illustration]


NEW YORK

CHARLES...

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...AMEND-ALL ...

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... ...

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... ...

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... II. THE BATTLE OF SHOREBY ...

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... 56

Lastly, a little before dawn, a...

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...stood wondering at the summons.

Tunstall hamlet at that period, in the reign of old King...

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...lord of mine," said the man in the smock. "I followed the
Walsinghams; so we all...

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...and while Clipsby walked leisurely over the
bridge, Bennet and young Shelton rode up the road...

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...and as for
archery--St. Michael! if old Harry the Fift were back again, he would
stand and...

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...good wager," answered Hatch.

"My surcoat to a leather belt, it would be you!" cried the...

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...archer scrambled half upon his
feet, called once upon the name of God, and then fell...

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...there is a bushel of gold therein. He had a strong hand to
get, and a...

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...narrowly
to see what lord is profited thereby. Now, Sir Daniel, having once more
joined him to...

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...them, as they went, clouds
began to arise and blot out the sinking sun. They had...

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...and a half desire that he might miss. The
quarrel sped.

The man stumbled and fell, and...

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...your own part,
A blak arrow in each blak heart.
...

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...his own natural father. But he said never a word, and kept
his countenance unmoved.

Hatch and...

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...into me, ye might, mayhap, lay out a
gold mark or mayhap a pound for my...

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...but mine orders, and
I shall be your good lord ever. I must have good men...

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...you the rest."

"Alas! my good lord, it may not be; I have no skill to...

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...They are no rogues who laugh, good
cousin. Good mine host, lay me a meal now...

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...the battle; I can spare you, friends. Mark me this old
villain on the piebald! A...

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...be certain of the morrow. Toss-pot and Shuttle-wit run in,
but my Lord Good-Counsel sits o'...

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...chargers saddled, and in
ten minutes five-score men-at-arms and archers, cleanly equipped and
briskly disciplined, stood ranked...

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...neighbouring landmarks but Kettley windmill on the knoll behind him,
and the extreme top of Tunstall...

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...shoulder, he saw the lad's face
peering from a clump of reeds.

"Are ye there?" he said,...

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...between us; he shall smart for all!"

"Would ye shoot at the moon with a hand-gun?"...

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...seems she is
of your mind, or else distasted to the bridegroom."

"Well! marriage is like death,...

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...deer."

So, with the horse trotting hard, and Dick running easily alongside,
they crossed the remainer of...

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...your back."

They were by that time at the mouth of the creek, and the view...

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...on the island, and sounds followed as of a
strong man breasting roughly through the wood.

"A...

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...had no
time to look for his direction; all he could do was to turn his...

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...Dick; "and then for a
fresh start. By the mass! but y' 'ave a rickety hand,...

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...but now that
the poor deer had run, she was like a messenger he should have...

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...massive boughs; and in the
fork, like a mastheaded seaman, there stood a man in a...

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...the king of the outlaws:
'What make ye here, my merry men, among...

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...the good king's deer to shoot a shaft into."

Still as he sang, he took from...

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...his hand.

"Lads!" he cried, "good fellows all, and my right merry friends, y' have
sung this...

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...pounds from
Appleyard. We took seven marks from the messenger last night. A day ago
we had...

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...shaft was an expected
signal. They were all afoot together, tightening their belts, testing
their bow-strings, loosening...

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...to my ruin."

Dick scratched his head.

"I cannot help it, Jack," he said. "Here is no...

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...Dick stood across him, flushed and menacing,
with doubled fist. Matcham lay where he had fallen,...

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...and there, one following another, Dick saw half a score green
jerkins mounting the ascent, and...

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...to warn them. But my
heart misgiveth me; they are but seven against so many, and...

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...his
agony; but no merciful enemy broke cover to put them from their pain.

The solitary survivor...

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...people
bursting through the underwood; and a bewildered deer ran out into the
open, stood for a...

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...lads followed the same course. Thus it followed that, while the
lads, bending continually to the...

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...lying, at this point, between two even walls of forest.

At the sight Dick paused; and...

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...It was now
growing late; the sun was setting in the plain beyond Kettley; the
tree-tops overhead...

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...again. The strap fell by his side, and he stood
irresolute, feeling like a fool.

"A plague...

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...the hand which was offered him, "good
speed to you, if speed you may. But I...

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...and there among the woods; the sun was not yet
up, but the eastern sky was...

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...and as the
creature moved, it seemed to feel its way with the tapping of a...

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...betoken? Let us go, by the mass!"

"He hath gone east," added Matcham. "Good Dick, let...

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...be man's courage, what a poor thing is
man! But sith ye will do naught, let...

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...to mind me of it! What? I skulked
for my poor life in my own wood...

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...canary, and pledged
his ward in dumb show.

"Selden," Dick faltered--"Selden--" And he paused again.

Sir Daniel put...

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...see poor Jack Matcham," replied the other, "that was
so fearful and burthensome, and yet plucked...

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...men. And more might be
continually expected to arrive. The danger lay not therefore in the...

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...said
their knave rhyme?--'A black arrow in each black heart.' Was it not so
it went? Appleyard,...

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...to my Lord of Wensleydale, and bring me
the answer back?"

One man instantly arose.

"I will, an't...

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...the house, and passing some little way along a flagged and
vaulted passage, came to the...

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...or his men, hath done this thing."

Dick paused in the stone passage with a heavy...

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...no word of Matcham. Dick began to grow alarmed, to
recall his companion's melancholy forebodings, and...

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...near, those he stood by, come wind or weather. But you, Dick,
y'are a fair-day friend,...

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...I speak
very freely; the time is not for courtesies. Even as I speak, so would...

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...out aloud, like some wild animal, and
buried his face in his hands.

Sir Daniel was by...

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...it; get the words ready. It shall be
sworn to-night."

"Now, may Heaven lighten you!" replied the...

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..."when first we read John Amend-All's paper,
I was convinced of so much. But suffer me...

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...me forth out of this house," he thought, "I am dead
man! And this poor Matcham,...

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...looked upon the moat, and
although it was so high up, it was heavily barred. The...

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...I know not," said the other, "but one time or
other, Dick, they do intend upon...

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...hurriedly returned, passed once more close below the lads, and
died away in the distance.

Here was...

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...to die, we die, and there's an end on't. But now
that I think, how found...

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...room.
The open chink through which some light still glittered was easily
discovered, and, taking a stout...

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...to
explore the other branch. It was exceedingly narrow, scarce wide enough
for a large man; and...

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...the
warding of me over the Lord Foxham's head. And then the world changed
again, and Lord...

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...returned to
watch.

Presently, at the far end of the passage, Bennet hove in sight. He
seemed to...

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...the last arrivals. A torch or two, each stuck
in an iron ring against the wall,...

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...his ears; he saw the
stars overhead, and the reflected stars below him in the moat,...

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...dark,
without a thought for the direction of his flight.

For a few steps missiles followed him,...

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...was perhaps twenty feet above the ground, and the poor fellow
had been drawn up so...

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...Dick had been hoisted to his shoulders, and he had taken
the lad's arms about his...

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...and
apprehension, conducted Dick into an inner chamber of the inn. There the
lad's hurts were looked...

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... * * ...

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...of
Lancaster had finally triumphed over its foes.

The small town of Shoreby-on-the-Till was full of the...

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...him in the wind; and the rear was brought up by the
four archers, each with...

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...Daniel, "the reason thereof
concerneth me only. Neither do I purpose to explain it further. Suffice
it,...

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...shrubs, and the surf beat upon the beach;
there was no other sound. Cautiously Dick footed...

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...sooth," said Dick, "but this is passing strange! Were they not
men of Sir Daniel's?"

"Nay, sir,...

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...the
figure of a man was seen, like a faint Chinese shadow, violently
signalling with both arms....

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...other particular the neighbourhood of
the little house lay undisturbed.

Presently Dick's reinforcements began to arrive. The...

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...up for lost and ran.

In this way the two small troops of the men of...

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...Dick
found that they had crossed the whole width of the beach, and were now
fighting above...

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...to make a clear end of
questioning, to what good gentleman have I surrendered?"

But before Dick...

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...the sea
was entirely silent and deserted.

Meanwhile, Dick and his men had returned to the alehouse...

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...carry. And in fine, my lord, methinks I had all the danger, as
well as all...

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...in battle, right courteous in
peace; a youth of excellent disposition and brave bearing. For your
estates,...

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...but not content with
that, he had stationed horsemen in all the neighbouring lanes, so that
he...

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...put out from the vessel's side, and the two men,
keeping her head well to the...

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...a hundred violent draughts, a fire of wreck-wood blazed
and vomited thick smoke.

"Ay, now," said Lawless,...

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...the movements of the outlaws from all
possible espial. In a trice they had leaped upon...

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...once more for the landing-creek with the best speed
of oars, he crossed himself devoutly, and...

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...the
glimmer of the firelight.

The shipman's eyes burned, although he still failed to recognise our
hero.

"Ay, boy,"...

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...a shrewd misgiving as to the result.

But Lawless, as if guided by an instinct, steered...

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...there fell,
through the black night, a shower of arrows sent at a venture; and so
close...

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...in the confusion. But perhaps they had
already begun to understand somewhat more clearly, or perhaps...

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...like a
beast that has been deadly wounded.

Six or seven of the malcontents had been carried...

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...rudder even now. Bide till she has settled a
bit lower; and she will either go...

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...fur cloak. A little lamp
burned dim before the Virgin in the bulkhead, and by its...

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...what I had done. But sith ye
are for York, follow me. I came hither but...

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...all the
men had crawled on deck, and were now gazing, with blank faces, upon the
inhospitable...

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...and as soon as the tide
hath somewhat ebbed, we may walk ashore upon our feet."

It...

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...ten miles of Shoreby-on-the-Till; and here,
after making sure that they were pursued no longer, the...

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...den, that
had now drifted a quarter full of snow. On the verge, a great beech-tree
hung,...

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...an they found it, Master
Shelton, it would break my heart. But here," he added, burrowing...

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...outlaw, "I do naught but for my pleasure.
Mind not for me. I am one, by...

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...Risingham, and found next day by Dick upon the body of the
messenger.

Then, treading down the...

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...to shower upon the people of the house,
proved that they owed their entertainment rather to...

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...sort of priest, friar, or pilgrim, were made welcome to the
lower table, and slept together...

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...already the dusk of the day; and in the house the
darkness of the night had...

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...I am no
thief. And even if I come here in war, as in some degree...

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...a door being opened, the hangings divided,
and, lamp in hand, Joanna Sedley entered the apartment.

She...

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...robe!"

"Nay, Joan," protested Dick, "'tis not alone the robe. But, lass, ye
were disguised. Here am...

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...tapestry
permitted him to breathe the more freely, and even to see into the room.

He had...

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...grown reassured as he found he
had to deal with an intoxicated man, and now, with...

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...and read the contents of the letter. It
was short, but, to Dick's delight, it gave...

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...was out of sight, Dick returned to his hiding-place,
resolutely fixed to see the matter out....

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...thought, my lord; y'are marked,
like an old oak, by the woodman; to-morrow or next day,...

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...less than
naught. Take me, I pray you, rightly."

"Why said ye he was rustic, Joan?" the...

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...arm,
another marched ahead with a link, and the fourth, with bent bow and the
arrow on...

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...if all goeth well, and ye have planned no
evil, in the end ye shall go...

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...what a strange web ye have woven,
that I should be, at this hour, at once...

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...breathed again.

What, then, was his dismay to feel himself plucked by the sleeve and to
find...

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...good quarrel
is an easy death, they say, though I could never hear of any that...

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...Duckworth.

Dick, who sat stunned among contrary emotions, grasping the desk in
front of him, beheld a...

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...I have thee fast; and by all
potent oaths, for every drop of blood that now...

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...I
see by your bearing that ye are high in station, and I read in your
countenance...

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...the young man
in."

Earl Risingham had heard in silence, and when the voices ceased, he
still stood...

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...but a handful.
Alack, if it were but to-morrow--could I but keep a certain tryst an
hour...

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...dealt with, and have much excuse. But look
ye, sir, I am, before all else, a...

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...most greedily to have your blood."

"My lord, I do now offer you in words my...

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...one after another, came out of the alehouse, and the last
closed the door behind him....

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...a
hiccup, "they be dumb. I like not this manner of discourtesy; for an a
man be...

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...fabric with a savage pull.

When he had done, the lad was a mere package in...

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...would I could see the man that
could cozen me! He were a cozener indeed! Nay,...

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...elbows like men
bent upon a pleasant hour.

The table at which they sat, like all the...

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...come home staggering."

Pirret licked his lips.

"And this magic," he said--"this password, whereby the cave is
opened--how...

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...and to complete the picture, when
one fell, a dozen would fall upon the top of...

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...slumber.




BOOK V

CROOKBACK




CHAPTER I

THE SHRILL TRUMPET


Very early the next morning, before the first peep of the...

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...him fell--in the stir of
the fight he hardly knew why; then he himself was struck...

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...speak
with."

"Is it so?" asked the other. "And yet ye threw yourself head-first into
this unequal battle."

"I...

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...arms for an embrace.

In the bottom of his heart Dick already entertained a great terror...

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...my poor opinion, one whole hour in front of you."

"I do think so indeed," returned...

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...Their swords shall not
ring more loudly on men's helmets than their names shall ring in
people's...

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...right hand out of
the direct advance. Swerving like a single rider, his whole command
turned after...

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...no sign of any foeman ready to attack, and Dick judged he had
some time before...

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...enemy had been steadily drawing nearer
across the market-place; and by this time were so close...

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...for a moment,
almost degenerated into flight.

Almost at the same time, those who had crossed the...

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...wadeth to the ankles in hot blood. Him can we trust. But mark
it, Sir Richard,...

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...I will tell you
honestly, here to stab you from behind."

Dick looked at the little man...

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...upon Dick's rear
was almost equal to the number in his face. It was plain that...

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...war, which, years afterwards upon the field of
Bosworth, and when he was stained with crimes,...

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...empty of horsemen, and
into the streets upon the farther side.

Every here and there small combats...

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...archer. "An I had thought ye were so
angry I would 'a' been charier of crossing...

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...steel. Not a ship, not so much as a
skiff remained in harbour; but the sea...

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...if I had ten such captains as Sir Richard, I would
march forthright on London. But...

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...glory of heaven, there your favour dies!"

"Mine is the loss," said Dick.

"Give him his sailor,"...

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...to him for vain regret. Catesby had now
collected the horsemen, and riding up to Dick...

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...of some, who lay upon their
back, he even recognised.

About half-way between the town and the...

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...feared to
expose Joanna to the hazards of a fight, had not yet decided between
them when...

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...the forest, suddenly split, like a bursting
shell, into two dozen others, leading to every point...

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...my kinsman," she replied.

"Dear madam," Dick cried, "I swear to you upon the rood I...

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...fame to marry with, and,
behold! I have brought about the death of your dear kinsman...

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...said, at length, "ye do not admire a maid in a man's
jerkin?"

The moon was now...

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...lady's pleasure.
Pardon me if I speak my plain thoughts plainly; but where a maid is...

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...stream strained sobbing through the snow and ice, was
effected with silence and order; and on...

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...Sedley and Sir Daniel's wife.

"Well," thought he to himself, "even if I lose my horses,...

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...bulk of Dick's command had simply
melted at the rumour of their coming.

Dick stood for a...

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...a downfall for conceit! But, dear, I care
not--dear, if ye still love me and will...

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...ye? If the men, upon the alarm
of the fighting, had fled away, we should have...

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...that district,
was already on the march to rejoin his brother; and not long after the
return...

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...withdraw; but he was not yet clear
of the refectory, when a man, but newly alighted...

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...what I can carry, and to begin life again in Burgundy or
France."

"Ye may not go...

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...hand and foot some
minutes past."

"Well, Dickon, I will go," replied Sir Daniel. "When we next...

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...and
for Sir Daniel, here lies his body. But for the priest, if I might
anywise prevail,...

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...is straight--" And there, in
a perfect consternation, the voice died on her tongue.

"He is straight,...

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... * *


Transcriber's Notes

Obvious typographical errors...