The Dynamiter

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1903 Longmans, Green And Co. edition by David Price,
email ccx074@pglaf.org

...

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... 1903

...

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...many precious elements and many innocent
persons whom it is a glory to defend_. _Courage...

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... 195
DESBOROUGH'S ADVENTURE:
...

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...a well-deserved experience of poverty and law. But in you,
Challoner, I can perceive no...

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...dear boy, on my last legs,' said Challoner.
'Besides the clothes in which you see me,...

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...and equal, sunk in a common degradation; but to the eye of
the observer, all ranks...

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...but that this great habit of
existence should bear fruit. I count myself a man...

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...equipped and for a better
cause, is in form and essence a more noble hero than...

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... Now here, I beg of you, the next adventure
that offers itself, embrace it in...

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...at first in a profound abstraction, bitterly reviewing
and repenting his performances at whist; but as...

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...smoke was melting in
the air, the whole event had come and gone as in a...

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... Their sound appeared to strike in her some strong emotion; for
scarce had he begun...

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...chill, and now
clutch his arm in hers. To Challoner her terror was at once...

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...Victoria Station
and here, at a street corner, the young lady paused, withdrew her arm
from Challoner's,...

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...as the distance lessened.
Against mere beauty he was proof: it was her unmistakable gentility that
now...

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...moved a little, and
drew herself upright; and finally, as with a sudden movement of
forgiveness, turned...

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...that we
should part, and that you should still suppose your kindness squandered
upon one who was...

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...far side the country was exceeding intricate and difficult, heaped
with boulders, and dotted here and...

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...jaws he must be eating; in that camp of famine he had
reserved a store of...

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...the rock; she lay too far sunk in the
first stage of death to have observed...

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...remainder of the party, who were now sufficiently
revived to hear; told them that he would...

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...as heretics and
half-believers by the more precise and pious of the faithful: Young
himself, that formidable...

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...hair-oiled, chin-bearded elders of the city, and the
ill-favoured and mentally stunted women of their harems,...

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...alkali.
As we continued to draw near, besides, a regular and panting throb began
to divide the...

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...thrown myself, one sultry, cloudy
afternoon, on a divan; the windows stood open on the verandah,...

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...him, as he valued life, to raise his
offering; and, before we parted, he had doubled...

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...prudence and devotion. I had no fear, indeed, but to
show myself unworthy of my...

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...Young's, and
offered him a choice of services: either to set out as a missionary to
the...

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...in despite of reason, I
connected in my mind the loss of that dear protector with...

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... 'Then, sir,' said she at last, 'you speak to deaf
ears. If this be...

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...quarrel among
themselves; of me, they have had nothing but my purse; such was not the
union...

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...the chimney once more vomited smoke; but the most
absolute silence reigned, and, but for the...

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...the
doctor motioned me to take a seat; and passing by another door into the
interior of...

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...way into the inner room.

It was very long. From end to end it was...

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...he made me sit by the fire, he
gave me wine to drink; and then, pacing...

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...Are you free from the entanglement of what the world
calls love? Do you still...

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...faculties, one
to be man's epitome--say, will that not satisfy the needs of an ambitious
girl? ...

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...walk in it, no higher than to my shoulders, like some
mountain fog. But, one...

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...had gone to the
doctor's house two nights before prepared to die, prepared for worse than
death;...

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...insult; and
thenceforward, through all that day, I sat in silence, gazing on the bare
plains and...

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...and anticipating in fancy the
touch of his hand and the sound of his voice. ...

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...ingredients; I
have fortified myself on every side from the possibility of error; what
was a dream...

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...host; and
it was not till a late hour, that, bidding me courteously good-night, he
once more...

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...the last projection will draw nigh. You have once
before assisted, although unconsciously, at the...

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...in my present
pass of horror and despair, it was to these very men that I...

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...story; and it might be true, but he
believed it was not. Miss Fonblanque was...

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...opinion
before that of my uncle, an ex-minister of state, a man with the ear of
the...

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...them in your pocket; and to
relieve our position of any shadow of embarrassment, tell me...

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...and write,
upon one corner of the table, a hasty note; still, as she did so,
glancing...

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...shining eye_!' she whispered, and instantly
leaped down upon the platform, with a thrill of gay...

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...neighbourhood weighed heavily on the
mind of the young man; once more, as in the streets...

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...bearer of a letter to a certain Miss Fonblanque. At this name,
as at a...

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...I begin to be weary of the
business. Either you shall immediately summon Miss Fonblanque,...

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...man. 'I am of a very nervous habit; a
long course of the dumb ague...

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...and that
again, by rapid and retreating footsteps in the street.

Challoner sprang into the passage. ...

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...he who began as a puppet, his experience told him, was often
doomed to perish as...

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...of his alarm yet unsubsided, found himself in the
company of two rough-looking men, in the...

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...The man assured
him that the whole expense was easily met from funds in his possession,
and...

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...all, when his
eye by any chance alighted on the Tyrolese hat or the degrading ulster,
his...

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...in sober livery. There were no arms upon the panel; the
window was open, but...

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...ten, twenty, or sixty seconds of still
uninterrupted silence, the lady should touch the check-string and
re-deposit...

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...Somerset, who was possessed of
an excellent temper, with the best grace in the world assisted...

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...close with any offer of interest, emolument, or pleasure; and
your summons, which I profess I...

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...own hands. Finding him
alone in a retired part of the rectory garden, I told...

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...the lawyer it was
a meeting I desired as little as themselves. He smiled at...

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...yet fully mastered the turbulence of
my emotions, when a voice at my elbow addressed me...

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...evening I sat by the fire considering my
situation. I could not pay the bill;...

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...'If you will accompany me,' said I, 'to a house not far from
here, you can...

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...figure we should otherwise present--a young man, a
young lady, and a mass of baggage, standing...

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...had expected. For all that, he took the number of the cab, and
spoke for...

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...the circumstances of
my birth, my flight, and subsequent misfortunes. He heard me to an...

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...the marriage, my daughter Clara. She had,
indeed, inherited a shadow of her father's failing;...

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...still, against
all these odds, I have undissuadably persevered.

It was after the loss of one of...

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...His companions--I counted seven of them in
all--proceeded, with disciplined activity, to take from the van...

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...evening
clothes; and he bore himself with a serious grace that immediately
awakened my attention. Before...

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...it
gently open and descended the stairs. The kitchen door of the house,
like the area...

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...if I could not manage to extract the matter of amusement
from so unusual a situation.

Behind...

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...even your enemies are subject.' He
looked at the clock on the mantelpiece and visibly...

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...his highness murmur.
'Alas, poor moth! must we again inquire which is the more fatal--weakness
or wickedness?...

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...a field of license, and
the good behaviour asked of them is at once so easy...

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...but the rude details of such a violent suicide I was unable to
endure. The...

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...my irregular hours and turned me from his house. I was
engaged in betrothal to...

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...the morning
beautiful; and I, who was sick, might lie in bed and rest myself: I,...

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...that you were a man.
As I saw the hour approach, I suffered agonies untold; and...

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...highness,' I said, 'to be very plain, this is my favourite house,
being not only a...

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...had suffered at the hands of persons similarly
constituted.'

'Oh, very well indeed,' replied the old lady;...

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...countenance.

'If I thought you capable of disrespect!' she cried.

'Madam,' said Somerset, with the extreme fervour...

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...painting which he had recently determined to adopt. It
did not take him long to...

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...square to study the result. It seemed,
to his eye, promising and unpretentious; and he...

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...adornment it may be called) of four red wafers! Am I,
then, to sink with...

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...to speculate; and those who pushed their inquiries
further, were too plainly animated by the spirit...

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...great works was condemned, withdrawn
from exhibition, and relegated, as a mere wall-picture, to the decoration
of...

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...gone abroad except in the evening.
But a man,' he added, 'must have some amusement.'

An hour...

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... The doors of the drawing-room flat were
never open; and although Somerset could hear him...

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...into the
hot fit of the detective fever; and the next morning resumed the practice
of his...

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...eyes involuntarily shifted to the
cartoons--'I adopted every method.'

Her eyes had followed his; for the first...

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...but beheld and
embraced the world, with an immoral approbation, the frequent consequence
of youth and health....

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...his miserable nervousness, the result, he
said, of a long course of dumb ague; and having...

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...cried, 'how changed it is!'

'Madam,' cried the young man, 'since your entrance, it is I...

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...she, 'what with all these clocks
and chemicals, without a drop of the creature life would...

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...the advertisement in the _Standard_ newspaper. The
great height of his lodger, the disproportionate breadth...

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...safest, and the most remunerative.' The speaker
paused as if to emphasise his words; and...

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...the existence of a
hunted brute, work towards appalling ends, and practice hell's
dexterities.'

Somerset, glass in hand,...

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...as the very
devil? Do you see upon my brow these furrows of anxiety? ...

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...employ the word "indiscriminate." Now, surely, a
scavenger's barrow and a child (if child there...

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...since marked out the child as the
sensitive point in society.' He wagged his head,...

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...well selected; and M'Guire, with a radiant provision of
the event, drew merrily nearer. Suddenly...

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...the Alhambra, when there flashed into his mind a
thought to appal the bravest. The...

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...at that time, was very empty; and he now observed a little
girl of about six...

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...victim of philanthropy? He thought of his old mother, of his happy
youth; of the...

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...as though he had lived for
centuries and for centuries been dead. The buildings and...

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...very jauntily hailed a hansom cab;
jumped in; bade the fellow drive him to a part...

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...man was not unknown to him; he had bought of his
wares, and heard him quoted...

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...be led into the semblance of
intimacy with such a man as his abominable lodger, appeared,...

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...the master of this
house; and I emphatically give you warning.'

'A week's warning?' said the imperturbable...

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...he wrung
the hand which had been dishonoured by the touch of an assassin; and
among all...

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...he could
carry. That inequality between kind sentiments which, to generous
characters, will always seem to...

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...of
your delightful company. Innocent prattler, you relieve the weight of my
concerns. And yet...

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...he cried, 'what ails you? Let me offer
you a touch of spirits.'

But Somerset had...

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...an instant staggered by this sudden change of front.
The next moment, with a despairing gesture,...

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...the Superfluous Mansion. Tripping down the steps, was the young lady
of the various aliases;...

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...he struck his
pipe upon the rail with unnecessary force. It was an old, sweet,
seasoned...

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...learns to appear
forbidding. But here, in free England--oh, glorious liberty!' she cried,
and threw up...

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...and yet somehow foreign,
tropical, and strange. In one hand she held a packet.

'Will you...

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...her hand lightly upon Harry's arm, and looked into his
eyes. 'Do you know,' said...

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...on your
thoughtful present; but alas, sir, of what use is it to me? And...

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...and transferred their simple obedience to myself; but still the
cloud only darkened on the brows...

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...as we hear of
plants that blight and snakes that fascinate, the woman shocked and
daunted me....

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...to all my threats, a cry broke from my lips, a cry of rage,
fear, and...

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...man, whom may Heaven assist! and
exercising among her ancient mates, the slaves of Cuba, an...

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...say such
words!--worth money. Do you begin to see? If I were to give...

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...Brazil; while others, from their peculiar water
and rude workmanship, I divined to be the spoil...

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...wall of poisonous and dusky foliage, the declivity of
the hill on which my father's house...

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...as I could see, to face me. My father still
murmuring of haste with weary...

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...powerful
sorcerer; for Madam Mendizabal had no sooner seen them coming, than she
took to the woods.'

'Fool,'...

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...forgive both you and me and our oppressors, and
Heaven help my helplessness!' Thereupon I...

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... 'And why hush? I am on my own place, I would have
you to...

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...I laid for him. He
praised and thanked me; told me I had all the...

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...seized with sudden
nausea, and must sit down a moment on the path. My heart...

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...thicket! Once helpless, how they would swarm
together to the assault! What could man...

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...the pick,' said he. 'Where are the jewels buried?'

I told him vaguely; and in...

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...honour,' I replied. 'Bear me out that I have warned you.
Greed of these pebbles,...

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...and still I was not sure that he had breathed
his last. At length, the...

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...In the midst, there stood a little low
and rude building, surmounted by a cross: a...

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...less than kind, invoking them upon myself. At
each petition, the tall negro, still smiling,...

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...in his arms
the body of the slave-girl, Cora. I know not if I saw...

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...ate (how should I bless the kindliness of Heaven!) my
eye, flitting to and fro in...

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...thought they all seemed disconcerted at this; and the officer, with
something of sharpness, asked me...

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...his direction; and as my eye lighted upon each, the poor
ignorant Africans ducked, and bowed,...

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...destiny that are not yours. I warn
you from the soul. No sooner arrived...

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...rocky
islets, hovered about by an innumerable cloud of sea-fowl. Immediately
under our board, a somewhat...

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...the room or raising my eyes to heaven; when there
appeared outside the window bars, the...

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...child,' he cried, clasping me in his arms, 'excuse a man who
might be your father!...

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...the page on which the dying man had scrawled his testament. How shall
I describe...

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...and
daughter; though I still withheld from him, of course, that respect which
is only due to...

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...building; nor
had the east begun to kindle to the warmer colours of the dawn, before...

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...entranced him; the books
that he sought out and read were books on Cuba, and spoke...

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...by his _fiasco_, the lady
received him with a friendly gaiety, protesting that all was for...

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...with a sort of bitter joy; he saw himself
follow the wedding party from a great...

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...the moving crowds of Holborn.

Puzzled and dismayed by this unusual behaviour, Harry returned to the
house...

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...leave
the box where you have put it and come straight on shore? Will you do
this,...

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...passed
from one dream to another all night long, the white face of Teresa still
haunting him,...

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...the wheels upon the road, he was conscious of a certain
regular and quiet sound that...

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...flow under her veil; but she vouchsafed no explanation. At the
door of the house...

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...never
grasped the depth and foulness of my guilt.'

The young man looked upon her aghast. ...

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...little to disperse: and when at length they drew
themselves, all limp and shaken, to a...

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...added, 'is another: "Othello's occupation's
gone." Yes, dear Somerset, it is gone; I am no...

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...I done to you, or
what have you done to yourself, that you should persist in...

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...the hall-door shut with a clang on the deserted mansion; and
still towing his laggardly companion,...

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...is no help
but you must carry it away with you. Come on, then, and...

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...not very clearly take your meaning,' said Zero, 'but I am sure you
mean kindly. ...

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...wealth like Vanderbilt, I should scorn to be reimbursed of
money I had so scandalously misapplied....

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...comfort since Zero was
expunged.

Late in the afternoon, he found himself at the door of Mr....

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...in Wales,' replied
Challoner modestly.

'Ah,' said Somerset, 'I very much doubt the legitimacy of inheritance.
The State,...

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...detect any positive disease. He did not
know that he had any family. He...

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...very red in the face, perhaps from having groped after his
cigar. 'I do not...

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...I am now a private person like yourself and many million others;
but I am one...

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...views are
formal like myself; and like myself, they also begin to grow old. But...

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...I will not hear one word in her defence; but as I value nothing so
particularly...

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...to place the name of Luxmore beside that of
Godall.'

'Your Highness,' said the old lady, 'I...

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...fightard;' and he goes on (if we correctly gather his
meaning) to object to such elegant...