The Ebb-Tide: A Trio And Quartette

By Robert Louis

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...THE EBB-TIDE

A TRIO AND QUARTETTE


By Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyde Osbourne



...

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...most miserable
English-speaking creatures in Tahiti; and beyond their misery, they knew
next to nothing of each...

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...in a strange office, and Robert relinquish his ambitions and
accept with gratitude a career that...

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...be soft, bread cheap, and manners easy) a skulker
from life's battle and his own immediate...

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...the pale eyes
and toothless smile of a vulgar and bad-hearted cockney clerk. Here was
society for...

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...least supportable when it draws near to the merely sensual
and selfish. Sometimes they held him...

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...it forward, and I thought I did.
Well, no sooner had I got to WORLD WITHOUT...

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...the world. "In the crack of a whip," said he. I
figured up the time. What...

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...there instead of trundling in
a growler?'

'I didn't want to startle a quiet street,' said the...

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...red syrup at that!' said the captain. 'And
those things they pull at, and go pop,...

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...natives and the piles of fruit. But not
even the beauty and the welcome warmth of...

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...he and his
companions hastened up the plank. They were welcomed on board with the
shaking of...

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...cut,' said the clerk. ''E's no good.'

'Well,' said the musician deliberately, 'one can't most generally...

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...the clerk. ''Asn't he 'ad a meal? I'M
lickin' my lips.'

Herrick reared up his wild eyes...

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...commanded the finest barque that ever
sailed from Portland; if you had been drunk in your...

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...tell you one of my silly stories, and broke off
to say I loved you? That...

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...said the captain gruffly. 'Came all of a rush,
when it did come.'

'Same here,' said Herrick....

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...he was seized just then by one of his prostrating accesses of
cough; his comrades would...

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...finger. From his jarred nerves there
came a strong sentiment of coming change; whether good or...

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...glory hallelujah!'

'Beer?' repeated Huish, struggling to his feet. 'Beer it is!' cried
Davis. 'Beer and plenty...

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...thick finger under the
music--'that's what I call Providence.'

'You said we had a chance,' said Herrick.

'Yes,...

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...consul, "and you
can count yourself damned lucky, Brown," says he. And he said it pretty
meaningful-appearing,...

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...'That you couldn't beg?
It's the one thing or the other, my son.'

'Ah, but this is...

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...of them. And if
you thought a cent about this father that I hear you talk...

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...like
wolves, and they look like preachers, and they look like the sick; Hulsh
is a daisy...

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...manned by natives in uniform, and steered by the doctor
of the port, put from shore...

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...pantry opened from the main cabin; the bulkheads were
painted white, the floor laid with waxcloth....

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...know that I'm afraid either,' said Herrick. 'But the thought of
these two men sticks in...

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..."sir" to every order I give you. If you're smart and quick, I'll
make this ship...

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...goes,' the captain cried, relinquishing the wheel to
Huish.

The next moment he was forward in the...

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...splendour of the west--when the captain took his
departure from the two islands, and the patent...

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...thieves. He said it to himself. He could
not touch the soup. If he had moved...

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...point. A babby could do that, let alone
a college graduate like you. There ain't nothing...

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...in, it don't matter.'

Herrick lay down in the weather alleyway; the night was cloudless, the
movement...

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...and
a heat of rage and resolution glowed in his bosom--rage against his
comrades--resolution to carry through...

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...passed them by. They hailed
him in thick voices, he made no answer, they cursed him...

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...afford the least assistance.

'What do we want of dead reckoning?' he asked. 'We get the...

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...supped alone, one after the other, opposite his
flushed and snorting body. And if the sight...

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...him his simple and hard story of exile, suffering, and
injustice among cruel whites. The cook,...

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...less embarrassing English, the sum of
what he now communicated. The ship had scarce cleared the...

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...believe they knew where they
were.'

'I think so too,' said Uncle Ned. 'I think no savvy....

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...plain he had already
drunk deep again at breakfast. Herrick avoided his eye; and resigned the
deck...

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...a drunken sot,' said Herrick.
'Now you're going to lose the Farallone. You're going to drown...

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...a scene to go through, and he was anxious and even eager to go
through with...

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...nor Huish? that you won't go on stealing my profits and drinking
my champagne that I...

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...that doll,
Herrick; it went down the way it was with the Sea Ranger, that day...

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...this incident. The mug passed round; each sipped,
each smelt of it; each stared at the...

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...Oh, my crikey!'
and he squirmed with mirth.

The captain managed to screw out a phantom smile.

'Here's...

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...figure up
to. Appears to me as if it amounted to about the bottom dollar of...

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...me clear. We don't want to go there with
this cargo; I don't know as old...

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...wheel also?'

'You come the 'eavy swell, don't you, ducky?' said Huish.

'Stand away from that binnacle....

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...breakfast for ten, and
you 'ollerin' for more! And now you "can't 'most tell"! Blow me,...

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...undecided.

The sky shaded down at the sea level to the white of opals; the sea
itself,...

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...same, if such
an island exists, which is very doubtful, and totally disbelieved in by
South Sea...

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...night
and the stars reigned undisturbed; it was as though a spark should
catch and glow and...

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...comprehending it;
and through the roar of so many miles of breakers, it was a silent...

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...the curtain was raised; they began to open out a haven, snugly
elbowed there, and beheld,...

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...the clock. The Farallones were sure of it; their eyes dug in the deep
shadow of...

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...an eye of unimpaired health and
virility; an eye that bid you beware of the man's...

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...a candle the vulgarity of
the clerk; and Herrick instinctively, as one shields himself from pain,
made...

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...looked over his shoulder, back at the bright water. 'Well,
so you'll come to dinner, then?...

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...as snug a berth as this. For it is a pretty snug
berth,' said he, with...

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...in with him, that's all! You'll get lots of pointers;
you can find out what he...

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...there nothing else he would be likely to keep here? Is there nothing
else he would...

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...pikey, crikey, fikey, chillingawallaba
dory.'

The captain suffered him to finish; his face was unchanged.

'The way things...

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...here and there in the crypt, there
was a rustle and scurry and some crowing of...

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...in the place.'

'I find it heavenly,' said Herrick, breathing deep, with head bared in
the shadow.

'Ah,...

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...never argue with young atheists or habitual drunkards,' said Attwater
flippantly. 'Let us go across the...

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...words, which were accompanied by a
gesture, they came forth out of the porch of the...

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...swiftly and looked far away to where the clouds were
beginning to troop together and amass...

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...know it, I put and keep you there, my fingers are on the
screws!' said Attwater....

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...a
well, or like the scales of balances. It had come to a choice, and one
that...

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...bedevilled and dishonoured soul there was no thought of self.

For how long he walked silent...

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...may be inclined to be a fool about women; so when we
were left alone, I...

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...of the hanging
lamps, the table shone with napery and crystal; followed him as the
criminal goes...

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...these were the ground of his
thoughts. There were times when he longed to throw down...

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...rest is conjecture.'

'Dr Symonds is your partner, I guess?' said Davis.

'A dear fellow, Symonds! How...

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...ring a bell, when there flows out from oneself
and everything about one a far more...

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...tell you, this racket
of Mr Attwater's takes the cake. In a ship, why, there ain't...

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...was nothing showy about Sullens; but he was
strong and steady, and ungraciously obedient. Now Sullens...

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...old schoolboy phrase, he was
plainly 'sucking up' to me; full of protestations of goodwill and
good...

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...which he spilled a good deal) with gentlemanly ease. 'A man
should learn to beyave at...

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...tonight--now--this moment!'

'It can't be, my son,' replied the captain firmly. 'No ship of mine puts
to...

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...love. Oh, my God, my God,
why was I born?'

Another pause followed upon this outburst.

The captain...

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...Halt!' cried the voice of Attwater.

And the captain, before he knew what he was doing,...

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...and He will settle it when the clock strikes. In my own case, I have
nothing...

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...moment. He twisted Huish
round, grasped him by the neck of the coat, ran him in...

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...man!' said Davis, kindly; 'this won't fight, you know! You've
got to brace up and help...

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...was aware
instantly of an opposition in his members, unanimous and invincible,
clinging to life with a...

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...of the lights of hope. The
poor diving dress of self-conceit was sadly tattered! With the...

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...wet,' said Herrick. 'Can you do anything with me?'

Attwater read his face attentively.

'It would depend...

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...until the food
came to an end, and the pangs of famine succeeded? For the Trinity
Hall...

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...house?

His eyes dwelled upon him with a strange avidity, as though he would
read into his...

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...believe I'll do a bit of breakfast.'

And he turned into the house.

The captain doggedly followed...

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...said he, 'are you man enough to take charge of 'Errick and the
niggers? Because I'll...

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...a
prejudice against it; it's considered vulgar, awf'ly vulgar.' He
unrolled the handkerchief and showed a four-ounce...

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...I'm gyme,
that's wot I am: gyme all through.'

The captain looked at him. Huish sat there,...

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...The stakes were so high--the pearls on the one hand--starvation
and shame on the other. Ten...

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...said Huish. 'Tyke a dip of ink. That's
it. William John Hattwater, Esq., Sir': he dictated.

'How...

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...be the better! But there's one thing
sure: I'll 'ear no more of your moonin', mullygrubbin'...

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...awf'ly peculiar to get
bowled over on a d'y like this. I'd rather 'ave it on...

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...between wind
and water, his mythology appeared to have come alive, and Tophet to be
vomiting demons....

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...his arms. In common with many men of his unhappy
physical endowments, Huish's hands were disproportionately...

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...me that you are not a perfec' gentleman; I
know a gentleman when I see him;...

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...with God!'

Davis looked, and his mind awoke. He did not dream of self-defence, he
did not...

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...him like that of a child among
the nightmares of fever: 'O! isn't there no mercy?...

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...stolen
ship.

It so chanced that, as his boat flew before the wind with much vivacity,
and his...

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...His arms. You see, I know!
I've been a sinner myself!'...