The Plays of W. E. Henley and R. L. Stevenson

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...L. STEVENSON***


Transcribed from the 1907 William Heinemann edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

Page 1

...MACAIRE 251




DEACON BRODIE
OR...

Page 2

...GRACE.
GEORGE SMITH, Mr. JULIAN CROSS.
HUNT, ...

Page 3

...strong enough?

MARY. You are satirical!

LESLIE. I? And with regard to the Deacon?...

Page 4

...rely upon it that he knows. There are not
many in Edinburgh who can match...

Page 5

...of him. It is that which makes my happiness complete.
Even to our marriage I...

Page 6

..._quam primum_.

BRODIE. Well, father, do you know me? (_He sits beside his father...

Page 7

...one at least is an unrivalled workman.

LAWSON. Ye’re right, sir; ye’re vera right, Mr....

Page 8

...at the match? ’Od, man, he has a nice
bit divot o’ Fife corn-land, I...

Page 9

...road
to my office wi’ ye. (_Exeunt_ BRODIE, LAWSON, LESLIE, _C._)


SCENE IV


...

Page 10

...to
the door_.)

GEORGE. Is he alive?

JEAN. I think there’s something wrong with him.

GEORGE. ...

Page 11

...tell me about Mr.
Procurator-Fiscal.]

GEORGE (_in an agony_). Jean, Jean, we shall be late. ...

Page 12

...my vitals!’] And the north road is no bad lay, Deakin.

BRODIE. Flush?

SMITH (_mimicking_)....

Page 13

...sit you down there, and be my good big brother, and I will
kneel here and...

Page 14

...should have told
me sooner, and I wouldn’t have worried you. Come along.

...

Page 15

... ...

Page 16

...Procurator-Fiscal, I had to look into
a ken to-night about the Captain, and an old cock...

Page 17

...Hamilton, otherwise
Sweepie,’ and so on. [’Willie M’Glashan,’ hum—yes, and so on, and so
on.] ...

Page 18

...house; and O, I just
ken I’ve been the ruin of him!

HUNT. Don’t you take...

Page 19

...Don’t talk of luck to a man like me! Why not say I’ve
the devil’s...

Page 20

...him any day, if so be as you or any on ’em ’ll make it
worth...

Page 21

...opposite_ BRODIE’S _and is served with bread and cheese
and beer_.

HAMILTON (_from behind_). The deevil...

Page 22

...Embrace me, at a distance. [A
patter-cove from Seven Dials!] Go, fill yourself as...

Page 23

...you, Captain! (_forcing him boisterously into
a chair_.) I don’t know if you can lie,...

Page 24

...you!

RIVERS. Sixes.

BRODIE. Deuce-ace. Death and judgment? Double or quits?

RIVERS. Drive...

Page 25

... ...

Page 26

...shame to be seen upon the streets.

BRODIE. See here, Jean. You must go...

Page 27

... [Here’s the devil at the door, and we must
bar him out as best we...

Page 28

...of my business that brings me, or I should tak’ the mair shame to
mysel’. ...

Page 29

.... . weel . . . be’t sae! Let the brandy bide, man, let...

Page 30

...[_Potius quam pereas_.]


SCENE V


BRODIE. Sore hearing, does he say? My hand’s wet. ...

Page 31

...it, and . . . Why, Will, what’s wrong with you? You look ....

Page 32

...word is spoken; there’s the end.

MARY. It shall not be the end. You...

Page 33

...woman, and . . . O my poor
Walter! It will break his heart! ...

Page 34

...about with a man called Badger Moore.

BRODIE. The boxer?

HUNT. That’s him. Know...

Page 35

...I spoke of you as I have found you. [I told
him you were a...

Page 36

...you thought, we must rook him to the heart. And therefore,
you put up your...

Page 37

...light weight, and you
fight at twelve stone ten, but I’m damned if I’m going to...

Page 38

...bells ring, and it’s a place where
men live gladly; and the Deacon himself can walk...

Page 39

...be fault of mine
if this thing fails; if this ship founders you have set your...

Page 40

...HUNT, _and afterwards_ MOORE

SMITH (_critically_). No, Duchess, he has not good manners.

JEAN. Ay,...

Page 41

...off_). Half a tick, George. (_To_ JEAN.) Mrs. Watt,
I’ve a warrant in...

Page 42

... HUNT, MOORE

HUNT. ...

Page 43

...and I lead off. With a question, Andrew. Did
you ever hear in your...

Page 44

... I’ll can tak’ ye to his vera door.

HUNT. How do you know?

AINSLIE. ...

Page 45

...come straucht to
ye. Eh God, I’m glad it’s nae mair nor that to start...

Page 46

...sorts to-day; we know that.

LESLIE. Admitted that you know more of life, sir; admitted...

Page 47

... Ye look like a ghaist, ye’re white-like,
ye’re black aboot the een; and do ye...

Page 48

... I did that. And what’s more, I’ve sat every night in case of
his...

Page 49

...almost friendly; I have caught it over the glass’s rim! If it
should be ....

Page 50

...me!
Why do you not speak? Man, I know you of old. Are you...

Page 51

... I dinna like that singin’ at siccan a time o’ the nicht.

BRODIE. I...

Page 52

...round my neck; [it is irrevocable now,] and you
must all suffer . . . all...

Page 53

...Do you want us all to get thundering
well scragged?

BRODIE (_going_). There is my master.

...

Page 54

... That’s your motto. Here are the
tools; a perfect picter of the sublime and...

Page 55

...slowly_.)
Second bunch, George. I know the lock. Steady with the glim. (_At
work_.)...

Page 56

... Take ’em alive, boys!

AINSLIE. Eh, but that’s awful. (_The Deacon leaps out_,...

Page 57

..._Fire
light_. _Stage dark_. _A pause_. _Then knocking at the door_, _C._
_Cries without...

Page 58

...ever he had; for, O dear leddie, I wad
gie my bluid to help him.

MARY. ...

Page 59

... Good cause! Something has happened. Something has happened . . .
to him!...

Page 60

...worthy of you?

MARY. It is my duty . . . my duty. Why...

Page 61

... (_He lights the candles_.) Your hand shakes, sir? Fie!
And you saved, and...

Page 62

...that. It’s not
danger now, it’s death. Death? Ah! Death! Death! Death!...

Page 63

...shrink
from me.

MARY. I do not care to hear, I do not wish, I do...

Page 64

...where it ends. Uncle, this is where it ends.
And to think that not an...

Page 65

... ...

Page 66

... Mr. EDMUND MAURICE
MENTEITH ...

Page 67

... Swift from shine to shade
The roaring generations flit and fade.
...

Page 68

...of him.

BARBARA. O madam, not the Beau’s own gentleman?

MISS FOSTER. Mr. Austin’s servant....

Page 69

...Mr. Anthony is a great concern
to me. He was orphaned, to be sure, at...

Page 70

...unmarried.

BARBARA. Sure, madam, that must be tiresome for him.

MISS FOSTER. Some day, child,...

Page 71

...man. You and that fine solemn fellow, John Fenwick, led a life that
was positively...

Page 72

...Foster,
Foster: always a Foster trick to wear the willow in anger.

DOROTHY. I do not...

Page 73

... DOROTHY

DOROTHY. How she tortures me, poor aunt, my poor...

Page 74

...my hopes, perish like my good name!


SCENE IV


...

Page 75

...Yet I must tell you. Sit down. (_She picks up the necklace_,
_and stands...

Page 76

...do I care? I loved you too. Little he thought of that,
little either...

Page 77

...time I ever came to the
Wells in another person’s carriage; Duke or not, it shall...

Page 78

...positively in flight.
Little Hortense of the Opera; you know; she sent her love to you....

Page 79

...commands
from Sir Frederick?

ANTHONY. None, sir, none.

AUSTIN. Shall I find you this noon upon...

Page 80

...Richard
Gaunt?

AUSTIN. The county member? An old and good friend. But you need...

Page 81

...Mr. Austin—bear with me awhile—I, on the threshold of
my life, who have made no figure...

Page 82

...now of friendship, and spoke
warmly. Have you forgotten Colonel Villiers?

AUSTIN. Mr. Fenwick, Mr....

Page 83

... O sir, will
you not picture that dear lady’s life? Her years how few,...

Page 84

... ...

Page 85

... To call her mine,
Sweet Lass of Richmond...

Page 86

... O, well, I know—that duel! But look here, Aunt Evelina, I
don’t think you’d...

Page 87

...his
ungentlemanly conduct. However, that’s all one. What I want is to make
Aunt Evelina...

Page 88

...Anthony, I don’t think there can
be anything.

ANTHONY. Think? Don’t think? What’s this?

BARBARA....

Page 89

...you.

BARBARA. I do hope, sir, you won’t use me against Miss Dorothy.

ANTHONY. That’s...

Page 90

...he’s going to
marry her, it’s a different thing; but I don’t believe he is, or...

Page 91

...Madam, can you doubt of that desire? can you question my
sincerity?

DOROTHY. Sir, between you...

Page 92

...And now I am
unworthy to be the wife of any gentleman; and you—look me in...

Page 93

...O John, John, how could you! And you, Mr. Austin, whither
have you brought me...

Page 94

...sooner than degrade myself by an unfaithful
marriage. How should I kneel before the altar,...

Page 95

...You? refuse George Austin? You never had the chance.

DOROTHY. I have refused him.

ANTHONY....

Page 96

... _Music_: ‘_Chè farò_,’ _as the drop falls_.

...

Page 97

...order of the day.

BARBARA. I beg your pardon, madam, I am sure, but are...

Page 98

...of us is worthy.

MISS FOSTER. This is the most amazing circumstance. You take...

Page 99

...brave
life, that was a great heart that I have ruined.

FENWICK. Ay, sir, indeed.

AUSTIN. ...

Page 100

...I must beg of your Highness, and, gentlemen, all of you here present,
to bear with...

Page 101

... THE SURVIVORS OF
...

Page 102

...North and South Atlantic; such a weary sight of water and no land;
never an island...

Page 103

...hasn’t learned to know you, Kit, as I have, nor yet do you
know him. ...

Page 104

...of my daughter;’ and the worst of it is, you see,
he’ll be right.

ARETHUSA. Kit,...

Page 105

...own. No
doubt you tell this girl of mine, and no doubt you tell yourself,...

Page 106

...at the mercy
of such a wretch as I was then, or as you are this...

Page 107

...be lost on that same reef of an ungodly husband. (_Goes
out_, _C._)


SCENE V


...

Page 108

...night long, upon my sinful feet, and with a empty belly.

ARETHUSA. You shall not...

Page 109

...ever in a manner of speaking refer to his old bo’sun David Pew?
him as he...

Page 110

...No bar; only
a big lock (_trying keys from his pocket_). Key one; no go....

Page 111

...pause_.)

GAUNT. David Pew, I have known you a long time.

PEW. And so you...

Page 112

...Guinea. Well, what came of
that? In five years’ time you made yourself the...

Page 113

... ‘Time for us to go,
...

Page 114

...This is the ‘_Admiral Benbow_,’ a respectable house, and
receives none but decent company; and I’ll...

Page 115

...rum, and suthin’ to scoff,
and a penny pipe, and a half-a-foot of baccy; and there’s...

Page 116

...‘you’re a man,’ he says; ‘I like a man to be a man,’ says he,...

Page 117

...he living on his fortune, like a gentleman slaver ought?

MRS. DRAKE. Well, sailor, people...

Page 118

... That I will, and twenty if you like, old girl. (_Kisses her_.)

MRS. DRAKE....

Page 119

...Pew, old David Pew, as
you may have heard of in your time, he having sailed...

Page 120

...won’t I, then!

MRS. DRAKE. I hope, madam, you don’t refer to my house; a...

Page 121

...and you, your brain
still whirling, to be snatched into the presence of the eternal Judge:
Christopher...

Page 122

... PEW, MRS. DRAKE, KIT

PEW (_coming out and waving...

Page 123

...Come now, you walk!

MRS. DRAKE. O, it’s not for your bidding. You a...

Page 124

...carried away the royal yard, and the stunsail boom was gone;
Says...

Page 125

... We kept the offing all day long and crossed the bar at...

Page 126

...but I’m not fit for her, Pew; I’m a drunken dog, and
I’m not fit for...

Page 127

...You’re
heart of oak, Pew, sure enough; and if you can bring the Adam—Admirable
about, why, damme,...

Page 128

... ARETHUSA, GAUNT

[GAUNT (_reading_). ‘And Ruth said, Intreat me...

Page 129

...the
whole sunshine of my life. Do you remember the manner of her departure?
You were...

Page 130

...came a
hurricane, and for seven days we were tossed on the deep seas, in the
hardest...

Page 131

... O teach me how! Show me the way! only show me.—O mother,
mother!—If it...

Page 132

...immortal; and when she died,
her one grief was to be parted from you, her one...

Page 133

...with it. What I want is to get rid of this dark lantern. ...

Page 134

...is this?

KIT. Captain Gaunt, that blind devil has half-throttled me. He brought
me here—I...

Page 135

...know the pair of us, and you can see his face and
mine.]

GAUNT. Christopher, the...

Page 136

...to go, and I’ll be
going. My service to you, Cap’n: and I kiss my...

Page 137

...again; I take him from my heart; I give myself
wholly up to you and to...

Page 138

...PEW _by the
arm_, _and goes out with him_.)


SCENE VI


...

Page 139

...at me like that I’d forgive you piracy on
the high seas. I was only...

Page 140

...GAUNT _entering L._

ARETHUSA. Father, Kit is gone . . . He is asleep.

GAUNT. ...

Page 141

...me thank and bless you! (_The
tapping of Pew’s stick is heard approaching_. GAUNT...

Page 142

...sweat. What devil’s den is this? I
must out—out! (_He shakes the door...

Page 143

...to you. (_Trying to sing_)—

‘Time for us to go,
...

Page 144

...the curtain rises_, _the sound of the violins is heard approaching_.
ALINE _and the inn servants_,...

Page 145

...sir! (NOTARY _makes for her_.)

CURATE (_capturing him_). You will infallibly expose yourself to
misconstruction....

Page 146

...a
cash-box—aha! and a cash-box, golden within. A money-box is like a
Quaker beauty: demure without,...

Page 147

... But I can’t stand it, and I’m off.
Good-bye: good luck to you, old man!...

Page 148

...it, Bertrand,
in a tasteful livery.

BERTRAND (_seeing_ CHARLES). Lord, a policeman!

MACAIRE. Steady! What...

Page 149

...the music ceases

DUMONT. Welcome, neighbours! welcome friends! Ernestine, here is my
Charles, no longer...

Page 150

...the babe unborn.

MACAIRE. Ahem! I think you said the linen bore an M?

DUMONT....

Page 151

...like myself, and like myself
the slave of duty. Last you have me—Baron Henri-Frédéric de...

Page 152

...Indubitably you may ask him.

(_All speak together_ . . .

MACAIRE. Can’t they...

Page 153

...what besides? my diploma of respectability, my
patent of fatherhood. I prigged it—in the ardour...

Page 154

...office_.)

BERTRAND (_looking after him_). Well, I—am—damned!

...

Page 155

...Bertrand, if I’d three hundred a year, I’d be honest
to-morrow.

BERTRAND. Ah! Don’t you...

Page 156

...comparatively, on your pocket. A
place by the fire, dear boy, a crust for my...

Page 157

...Not at all. This is the other.

MARQUIS. This man?

MACAIRE. This is the...

Page 158

... Where do you keep
them at night?

MARQUIS. Under my pillow. I think it...

Page 159

...money! (_Dashing down the notes_.) Man, if I met
you in a lane! ...

Page 160

...thought . . . I had fancied . . .

MACAIRE. No, Dumont, you had...

Page 161

... We all heard it drop.

MARQUIS (_with_ BERTRAND’S _bundle_). Is this it?

ALL (_with fury_)....

Page 162

...they will have it.

BERTRAND. It? What?

MACAIRE. The worst, Bertrand. What is...

Page 163

...Blinding dark; and a good job.

BERTRAND. Macaire, I’m cold; my very hair’s cold.

MACAIRE. ...

Page 164

...fit, I’m not fit, for either! Why, how’s this? I want to cry....

Page 165

...that had
the twisted handle.

MACAIRE. I told you so.

DUMONT. Now, what we have to...

Page 166

...DUMONT). My excellent friend, I will discharge your
commission, and return with all speed. ...

Page 167

...side_). It’s
life and death: they must soon find it.

MACAIRE (_aside_). Don’t I know?...

Page 168

...myself and my own
people.

BRIGADIER. Yes, but these strangers?

DUMONT. They are strangers to me.

MACAIRE....

Page 169

... ...