The Pocket R.L.S.: Being Favourite Passages from the Works of Stevenson

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE POCKET R. L. S.

Being favourite passages from the works of Stevenson.


By Robert Louis Stevenson



SELECTED...

Page 1

...nerves, that the whole
delight of the moment must depend.

*****

You should have heard him speak of...

Page 2

...can find out the world, says Solomon, from beginning to end,
because the world is in...

Page 3

...is enough to overthrow for him the whole fabric of his
life, to take, except at...

Page 4

...high industry, but it is one that serves to occupy and compose the
mind. And when...

Page 5

...a pipe for any
wind to play upon.

*****

It must not be imagined that a walking tour,...

Page 6

...the low road or the high, choose the
shadow or the sunshine, suffer himself to be...

Page 7

...sweep away into the golden
distance.

*****

Now, there is no time when business habits are more mitigated...

Page 8

...was fit,
By punctual eve the...

Page 9

...drooping its boughs into the water, and piling them up aloft
into a wall of leaves....

Page 10

...to come to each place in the right spirit.
The traveller, as Brantome quaintly tells us,...

Page 11

...in the earthquake, and there is a glamour over all the
objects of sight, and a...

Page 12

... Yet all the land was green;
...

Page 13

...moiling in the gold-mill.

*****

If a person cannot be happy without remaining idle, idle he should
remain....

Page 14

...an elective, personal sympathy, and not
accept them as an adjunct of the station to which...

Page 15

...would put aside the leaves and
show you his flushed and rustic visage; or as a...

Page 16

...above all this hurly-burly I could
hear the changeful voices of the Roost and the intermittent...

Page 17

...a great vacancy and blackness; and the road as it
drew near the edge of the...

Page 18

...She
may rest assured of one thing, although she never should marry a heroic
general, never see...

Page 19

...of long pedigrees, that we can follow
backward the careers of our HOMUNCULUS and be reminded...

Page 20

...There is our true base; that is not only the beginning, but the
perennial spring of...

Page 21

...call blind
forces; their blindness being so much more perspicacious than the
little, peering, partial eyesight of...

Page 22

...out in words (the way
youth loves to do, and should) there might have been no...

Page 23

...HERNANI. There is some meaning in the old theory about wild
oats; and a man who...

Page 24

...men about life have been accepted as final. All sorts
of allowances are made for the...

Page 25

...errand; and, taking a book
of fairy tales, went down alone through a fir-wood, reading as...

Page 26

...succeed, grave and more
substantial; the symptoms change, the amiable malady endures; and still
at an equal...

Page 27

...it is to take a tub for a fortified
town and a shaving-brush for the deadly...

Page 28

...a decline, and are driven off in a hearse with
white plumes upon it. Would you...

Page 29

...we; the
best that is in us is better than we can understand; for it is...

Page 30

...swan and seen it
take wing and disappear. The wild swan in question was now an...

Page 31

...possession as solid as a landed
estate, a fortune which we can never exhaust and which...

Page 32

...even at their most acute, convey decided pleasure; while
experience itself, in the cockpit of life,...

Page 33

...sake
of work; we must all work, as Thoreau says again, in any 'absorbing
pursuit--it does not...

Page 34

...that many of the
wisest, most virtuous, and most beneficent parts that are to be played
upon...

Page 35

...and sometimes even a peal of healthy, harsh
horse-laughter comes up to you through the darkness....

Page 36

...keep up his self-respect!

*****

Time went on, and the boy's health still slowly declined. The Doctor
blamed...

Page 37

...should endure the miseries
of unsuccessful literary toil beyond a period to be measured in weeks.
There...

Page 38

... A captive soldier of the right!
Or free and...

Page 39

...is called his fortune.
He must honourably perform his stewardship. He must estimate his own
services and...

Page 40

...habits in order to
be happy, is in much the same case with one who requires...

Page 41

...specious as a statue to the first
glance, and yet, on examination, as lively and interesting...

Page 42

...lost. Strange as my circumstances
were, the terms of this debate are as old and commonplace...

Page 43

...of the Gordian knots of life; each must be smilingly unravelled.

*****

It is perhaps a more...

Page 44

...we judge it needless to deserve them.

*****

'Do I, indeed, lack courage?' inquired Mr. Archer of...

Page 45

...to solve, the problem.

*****

The best teachers are the aged. To the old our mouths are...

Page 46

...walk
straight before us by what light we have. They may be right; but so,
before heaven,...

Page 47

...tried. But it is not so common a reflection, and surely more
consoling, that we usually...

Page 48

...the problem, and piles of words have been heaped
one upon another into dry and cloudy...

Page 49

...Greenville chewing wine-glasses at table makes no very
pleasant figure, any more than a thousand other...

Page 50

...poets: to find
out where joy resides, and give it voice beyond singing.

*****

He who shall pass...

Page 51

...descended, irremediably condemned to prey upon his fellow
lives: who should have blamed him had he...

Page 52

...that ten thousand bad
traits cannot make a single good one any the less good.

*****

His was,...

Page 53

...the Bazins knew how much I liked them? perhaps they,
also, were healed of some slights...

Page 54

...be
martyred without some external circumstance and a concourse looking on.

*****

An imperturbable demeanour comes from perfect...

Page 55

...and terror are only one, not two;
And the world has room for...

Page 56

...there are
some things that fall so bitterly ill on this side time!

*****

To write with authority...

Page 57

...the march of the stately period. NON RAGIONIAM of
these. But to all the step is...

Page 58

...who learn much do but skim the face of knowledge;
they seize the laws, they conceive...

Page 59

...of woe, as Whitman calls it, this MALADIE DE RENE, as we
like to call it...

Page 60

...For though here and there a Lord Macaulay may escape from school
honours with all his...

Page 61

...the idler's knowledge of life at large, and Art of
Living?

*****

Nay, and the idler has another...

Page 62

...population.

*****

Its not only a great flight of confidence for a man to change his creed
and...

Page 63

...he takes delight;
The plough, the spear, the laden barks,
...

Page 64

...be in the wrong, we ourselves are not
completely right.... I know right well that we...

Page 65

...have been trimmed
to flatter us, till they are all emasculate and sentimentalised, and
only please and...

Page 66

...help us, and it is not meant to help us. It is not even
its own...

Page 67

...the toughest
theorising; life is an affair of cavalry, where rapid judgment and
prompt action are alone...

Page 68

...cleverly put. An able
controversialist no more than an able general demonstrates the justice
of his cause.

*****

To...

Page 69

...congregation
truly curious in such flights of theological fancy, as one of veteran
and accomplished saints, who...

Page 70

...a man who is of Christ's philosophy--every
such saying should come home with a thrill of...

Page 71

...of each fresh generation and each
new-coined spirit throw another light upon the universe, and contain
another...

Page 72

...At the worst we are so fallen and passive
that we may say shortly we have...

Page 73

...unmanly shame
which withholds a man from daring to betray emotion, a lover, at the
critical point...

Page 74

...from every degree of mental
elevation and abasement--these are the material with which talk is
fortified, the...

Page 75

...any state of health.

*****

And it happens that literature is, in some ways, but an indifferent
means...

Page 76

...a repetition of
the discipline.

*****

All natural talk is a festival of ostentation; and by the laws...

Page 77

...of the day in the nineteenth century, there is
nothing that an honest man should fear...

Page 78

...a very thing in its way, but it does not rise superior
to all considerations. I...

Page 79

...to count the strokes and
wander on again into the moving High Street, stunned and sick...

Page 80

...and begins to eat up his words, he
should be listened to like an oracle. Most...

Page 81

...a three-legged stool, he it is who has the wealth and glory.

*****

For truth that is...

Page 82

...on
the playground of their youth. But the memories are a fairy gift which
cannot be worn...

Page 83

...waylay Destiny, and bid him
stand and deliver. Hard work, high thinking, adventurous excitement,
and a great...

Page 84

...to re-awaken in us the
sharp edge of sense, and that impression of mystic strangeness which
otherwise...

Page 85

...heart.

*****

O, have it your own way; I am too old a hand to argue with...

Page 86

...all command their respect; he will be
steadfast-proud, if you please; dry-possibly-but of all things
steadfast. They...

Page 87

...man's vanity and self-importance;
their managing arts-the arts of a civilised slave among good-natured
barbarians-are all painful...

Page 88

...root you are provoked out of your indifference; you
have a hand in the game--your friends...

Page 89

...slope. But you
have only ended courting to begin marriage. Falling in love and winning
love are...

Page 90

...only to obscure the
knowledge of one sex by another, but to magnify the natural differences
between...

Page 91

...touch for the
affections. And it is more important that a person should be a good
gossip,...

Page 92

...patience, two lives may grow
indissolubly into one.

*****

'Well, an ye like maids so little, y'are true...

Page 93

...incommunicable thrill of things, that is the tuning-fork by which
we test the flatness of our...

Page 94

...can
put in the quaint figure that spoke a hundred words with us yesterday
by the wayside;...

Page 95

...the apprentice to any art is both unstrained and pleasing;
it is strewn with small successes...

Page 96

...women, who understand men so well for practical purposes, do not
know them well enough for...

Page 97

...her child, counts out their caresses upon niggardly
fingers, and says, in the voice of authority,...

Page 98

...different friends; yet if we look closely we shall
find that every such relation reposes on...

Page 99

...not the same as friendship between man and man. Such
friendship is not even possible for...

Page 100

...own last vengeance upon those who fail to
value him; but now as a power that...

Page 101

...in
that eternity of which we know, and need to know, so little; avoiding
the bright, crowded,...

Page 102

...walk undisturbed among graves. And so the martyrs' monument is a
wholesome spot in the field...

Page 103

...influence on
conduct under healthy circumstances.... If we clung as devotedly as some
philosophers pretend we do...

Page 104

...his pulses going true and fast, and gathers impetus as
he runs, until, if he be...

Page 105

...tree-stump and
kissed her hand to the canoeists. Not Diana herself, although this
was more of a...

Page 106

... Or, Lord, if too obdurate I,
...

Page 107

...the peace of this roof, weak men and
women subsisting under the covert of Thy patience....