The Silverado Squatters

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1906 Chatto & Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org

[Picture: Picture of...

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... ...

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... 127
THE SEA FOGS...

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...mining operations, are the staple of men’s talk.
Agriculture has only begun to mount above the...

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...deep-sea ships come, bringing nothing, and return
with bread.

The Frisby House, for that was the name...

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...either hand, and first
thicket and then wood began to clothe their sides; and soon we...

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...dear to legend, starts his
horses for the Geysers.

It must be remembered that we are here...

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...gone home, I dropped into
Cheeseborough’s, and was asked if I should like to speak with...

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...there. At the other end,
the tenant of a cottage sank a well, and there...

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...ruminating jaws, her big red face crawled over by
half a dozen flies, a monument of...

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...and got no good from that; without doubt
he had loved the bottle, and lived the...

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...a tone of real affection in his voice.
I was mightily surprised, for he was obviously...

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...place of these
imperial elixirs, beautiful to every sense, gem-hued, flower-scented,
dream-compellers:—behold upon the quays at Cette...

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...innuendo.

“You want to know why California wine is not drunk in the States?” a San
Francisco...

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...our English hawthorn, and the buck-eyes were putting forth their
twisted horns of blossom: through all...

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...anxiety. I tasted all. I tasted every variety
and shade of Schramberger, red and...

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...a man from Barra to be more than half a
foreigner. Yet let us meet...

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...meet an Englishman to-morrow, upon
Chimborazo, and neither of them care; but when the Scotch wine-grower
told...

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...him to measure the tree
at the level of the ground, and entered the figures in...

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...army of miners had departed,
and left this quarter of the world to the rattlesnakes and...

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...summer
evenings playing sentimental airs on the violin.

I had no idea, at the time I made...

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...to his wife. And
she said, “Yes; extremely well.” Now there was no one living...

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...Toll road, or, to be
more local, entered on “the grade.” The road mounts the...

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...make the passage
difficult. But now we were hard by the summit. The road...

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...the sentiment of Sunday outings, breathed geniality
and vagueness, and suffered a little vile boy from...

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...round the Hansons’ chicken-house.

Mrs. Hanson was at home alone, we found. Rufe had been...

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...we looked forth into a great realm of air, and down upon
treetops and hilltops, and...

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...In front, in the strong sunshine, the platform lay
overstrewn with busy litter, as though the...

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...back to the Toll House, the Jews were not long of
striking forward. But I...

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...a mountain-top around a
glow-worm.



CHAPTER III. THE RETURN


NEXT morning we were up by half-past five, according...

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...of the playful, innocuous American cocktail. I
drank it, and lo! veins of living fire...

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...with the prettiest combination of
sentiment and financial bathos. Abramina, specially, endeared herself
with every word....

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...the course of time and by the accumulation of
evidence. At length all doubt was...

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...sky was one field of azure. Not a leaf
moved, not a speck appeared in...

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...dead trees. It went straight down that steep
canyon, till it brought you out abruptly...

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...had been the assayer’s office. The floor was thick with
_débris_—part human, from the former...

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...and groping for these written evidences of the past, Sam, with a
somewhat whitened face, produced...

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...state as
the one below, though, perhaps, there was more hay, and certainly there
was the added...

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...planted
close against the hill, and overhung by the foliage and peeling boughs of
a madrona thicket....

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...But
about nine, as a particular favour, we should have some hay.

So they took their departure,...

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...quiet places of the country; rebellious to all labour, and
pettily thievish, like the English gipsies;...

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...at any step, he had
turned round and walked away again, so warily and slowly, and...

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...Napa
Valley, as the man aloft looks down on the ship’s deck. There they kept
house,...

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...only leggy, coltish,
and in the road. But it was plain he was in high...

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...gum, and in his own cloudy manner
enjoying life, and passing judgment on his fellows. ...

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...looked
ugly and almost deformed. It was only by an effort of abstraction, and
after many...

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...that I would rather chop firewood
for myself than be fooled; and, in short, the Hansons...

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...it seems to me
as if, in the persons of these brothers-in-law, we had the two...

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...was less
fresh that morning than of wont. But I had no sooner reached the...

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...a frozen sea; and yet, as I looked again, I
was not sure but they were...

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...me, in the deep gap where the Toll House
stands and the road runs through into...

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...had
beheld at daybreak. For, first, the sun now fell on it from high
overhead, and...

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...dinner, and began to blow
squally from the mountain summit; and by half-past one, all that...

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...(Mr. Corwin was not represented), a mirror,
and a selection of dried grasses. A large...

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...before stage time, that castle of indolence awoke. The ostler
threw his straw away and...

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...in one person the
depravities of two races and two civilizations. For all his lust...

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...back to Calistoga and a cottage on the
green. By that time we had begun...

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...back. The stars, by
innumerable millions, stuck boldly forth like lamps. The milky way...

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...with a great hurricane, thinks of it very
differently from him who has seen it only...

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...STORY OF A MINE


NO one could live at Silverado and not be curious about the...

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...perished, leaving not a stick and scarce a memory
behind them. Tide after tide of...

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...last I never had a glimmer of an idea what was going
on; and even now,...

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...it at all credible that Ronalds would
forget what Rufe remembered? The days of grace...

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...shaft and tunnel.

Presently we heard his voice raised to his companion. “We drifted every
sort...

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...the very front of our house, between the
door and window, painted in cinnabar—the pigment of...

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...Breedlove, his large, dull
friend, to act, I suppose, as witness; Mrs. Hanson, in her Sunday...

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...on the same cairn—a “mound of rocks” the notice
put it; and the other to be...

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...the doors and
windows with white cotton cloth, became a healthy and a pleasant
dwelling-place, always airy...

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...on the water to boil, and strolled forth
upon the platform to wait till it was...

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...calcanthus, where the rattlesnakes lay
hissing at his passage. Yet I liked to draw water....

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...and even the natural hill-side was all sliding gravel and
precarious boulder. Close at the...

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...were not so
tall as myself, or but a little taller, and the most of them...

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...our passage woke their angry buzz. One dwelt habitually in
the wood-pile, and sometimes, when...

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...and gravel scaurs.
Here and there a big boulder sat quiescent on a knoll, having paused
there...

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...whistle sounded from rock to rock, calling and replying the
same thing, as in a meaningless...

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...and it was only
with the return of night that any change would fall on our...

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...mother airs the night
nursery before the children sleep. As far as I could judge,...