The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

By Robert Louis

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...[Editor's Note: It has been called to our attention that Project Gutenberg ebook #43 which...

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...fortune to be the last reputable acquaintance and the
last good influence in the lives of...

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...and a blind forehead of discoloured wall on
the upper; and bore in every feature, the...

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...not much the worse, more frightened,
according to the Sawbones; and there you might have supposed...

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...a man does not, in real life,
walk into a cellar door at four in the...

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...door, and nobody goes
in or out of that one but, once in a great while,...

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...never to
refer to this again."

"With all my heart," said the lawyer. "I shake hands on...

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...on a great-coat, and set
forth in the direction of Cavendish Square, that citadel of
medicine, where...

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...a
night of little ease to his toiling mind, toiling in mere darkness
and besieged by questions.

Six...

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...time forward, Mr. Utterson began to haunt the door in the
by-street of shops. In the...

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...name; and meeting you
so conveniently, I thought you might admit me."

"You will not find Dr....

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...it be the
old story of Dr. Fell? or is it the mere radiance of a...

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...the butler. "Indeed
we see very little of

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him on this side of the house; he mostly...

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...loved to detain the dry lawyer, when the
light-hearted and the loose-tongued had already their foot...

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...the choice; but indeed it isn't what
you fancy; it is not so bad as that;...

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...she narrated that experience), never had
she felt more at peace with all men or thought...

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...and stamped
envelope, which he had been probably carrying to the post, and which
bore the name...

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...The thoughts of his mind,
besides, were of the gloomiest dye; and when he glanced at...

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...hearth there lay a pile of
grey ashes, as though many papers had been burned. From...

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...glass
presses, furnished, among other things, with a cheval-glass and a
business table, and looking out upon...

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...Dr. Jekyll, whom he had long so unworthily repaid for a
thousand generosities, need labour under...

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...that had long dwelt unsunned in the foundations of his
house. The fog still slept on...

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...during which Mr. Utterson struggled with
himself. "Why did you compare them, Guest?" he inquired suddenly.

"Well,...

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..."The doctor was confined to the
house," Poole said, "and saw no one." On the 15th,...

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...sake, stay and do so; but if you cannot keep clear
of this accursed topic, then,...

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...Henry Jekyll." Utterson could not
trust his eyes. Yes, it was disappearance; here again, as in...

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...this was a back way to Dr. Jekyll's! It was
partly your own fault that I...

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... ...

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...Utterson
thought he had never seen that part of London so deserted. He
could have wished it...

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...you in, don't go."

Mr. Utterson's nerves, at this unlooked-for termination, gave a
jerk that nearly threw...

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...and twice and
thrice in the same day, there have been orders and complaints,
and I have...

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...Mr. Utterson,
"but I think I begin to see daylight. Your master, Poole, is
plainly seized with...

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...the creature was so doubled up,
that I could hardly swear to that," was the answer....

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...quite
dark. The wind, which only broke in puffs and draughts into that
deep well of building,...

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...fifth, that the lock burst in sunder and the wreck
of the door fell inwards on...

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...the by-street. It was locked; and lying near by on
the flags, they found the key,...

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...in case of disappearance; but, in place of the name of
Edward Hyde, the lawyer, with...

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...them; and
Utterson, once more leaving the servants gathered about the fire
in the hall, trudged back...

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...but even if I am in error, you may know
the right drawer by its contents:...

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...that case,
dear Lanyon, do my errand when it shall be most convenient for
you in the...

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...in a total of several hundred entries; and once very
early in the list and followed...

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...of his entrance,
struck in me what I can only describe as a disgustful curiosity)
was dressed...

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...his hand upon his
heart: I could hear his teeth grate with the convulsive action of
his...

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...of our
profession. And now, you who have so long been bound to the most
narrow and...

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...fond of the
respect of the wise and good among my fellow-men, and thus, as
might have...

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...infallibly in one
direction and in one direction only. It was on the moral side,
and in...

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...elements in my soul.

I hesitated long before I put this theory to the test of
practice....

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...that their
unsleeping vigilance had yet disclosed to them; I stole through
the corridors, a stranger in...

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...and from these agonies of death and birth, I
had come forth an angel instead of...

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...and in a moment, like a schoolboy, strip off
these lendings and spring headlong into the...

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...easily
eliminated from the future, by opening an account at another bank
in the name of Edward...

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...was that,
when I was unable to conceal the alteration in my stature? And
then with an...

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...Jekyll, or but remembered him as the mountain
bandit remembers the cavern in which he conceals...

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...I was conscious, even when I
took the draught, of a more unbridled, a more furious...

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...this
remorse began to die away, it was succeeded by a sense of joy.
The problem of...

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...with
spring odours. I sat in the sun on a bench; the animal within me
licking the

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chops...

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...(which was
indeed comical enough, however tragic a fate these garments
covered) the driver could not conceal...

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...and got into bed. I
slept after the prostration of the day, with a stringent and
profound...

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...the phenomena of

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consciousness, and was co-heir with him to death: and beyond these
links of community,...

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...You will learn from Poole how I have had
London ransacked; it was in vain; and...