The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

By Robert Louis

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...THE STRANGE CASE OF DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE

by Robert Louis Stevenson




STORY OF THE DOOR


Mr....

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...of business, that they might enjoy them
uninterrupted.

It chanced on one of these rambles that their...

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...state of mind
when a man listens and listens and begins to long for the sight...

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...in the middle,
with a kind of black sneering coolness--frightened too, I could see
that--but carrying it...

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...Though
even that, you know, is far from explaining all," he added, and with the
words fell...

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...point. He's an extraordinary looking man, and yet
I really can name nothing out of the...

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...Jekyll's
"disappearance or unexplained absence for any period exceeding three
calendar months," the said Edward Hyde should...

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...reply. "But it is more than ten years since Henry
Jekyll became too fanciful for me....

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...to see it glide more stealthily through sleeping
houses, or move the more swiftly and still...

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...the vast
hum and clatter of the city. Yet his attention had never before been so
sharply...

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...anger. "I did not
think you would have lied."

"Come," said Mr. Utterson, "that is not fitting...

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...and he drew near and leaned on the
tall fender. This hall, in which he was...

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...have
secrets of his own; black secrets, by the look of him; secrets compared
to which poor...

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...I tell you so again," continued the lawyer. "I have been learning
something of young Hyde."

The...

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...laying his hand upon the other's
arm; "I only ask for justice; I only ask you...

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...surprised and a trifle hurt; and at that Mr. Hyde broke out of
all bounds and...

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...in my cab," he said, "I think I can take you to his house."

It was...

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..."I had better tell you
who this person is," he added. "This is Inspector Newcomen of...

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...had once been a garden,
to the building which was indifferently known as the laboratory or
dissecting...

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...quite sure of him," replied Jekyll; "I have grounds for certainty
that I cannot share with...

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...Plainly the
letter had come by the laboratory door; possibly, indeed, it had been
written in the...

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..."The man, of course, was mad."

"I should like to hear your views on that," replied...

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...Hyde. Now that
that evil influence had been withdrawn, a new life began for Dr. Jekyll.
He...

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...Utterson. "Have you seen him?"

But Lanyon's face changed, and he held up a trembling hand....

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...some deeper ground.

A week afterwards Dr. Lanyon took to his bed, and in something less...

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...had something on his mind. Utterson became so used to the unvarying
character of these reports,...

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...the words were hardly uttered, before the smile
was struck out of his face and succeeded...

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...answer; "but will you come along with me
and see for yourself?"

Mr. Utterson's only answer was...

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...your tongue!" Poole said to her, with a ferocity of accent that
testified to his own...

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...to stay? That won't hold water; it doesn't commend itself to
reason."

"Well, Mr. Utterson, you are...

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...out to look for this
drug or whatever it is; for the cabinet door was open,...

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...very well said," returned the lawyer; "and whatever comes of it,
I shall make it my...

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...of you; but it is now our intention to make
an end of it. Poole, here,...

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...to see you." He paused a moment, but there came no reply. "I give
you fair...

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...second
flight of stairs. There were besides a few dark closets and a spacious
cellar. All these...

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...the glazed front of the presses, and their own pale and fearful
countenances stooping to look...

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...was a third enclosure?" asked Utterson.

"Here, sir," said Poole, and gave into his hands a...

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...the top or (which is the same
thing) the third from the bottom. In my extreme...

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...made sure my colleague was insane;
but till that was proved beyond the possibility of doubt,...

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...(like too
many of Jekyll's investigations) to no end of practical usefulness.
How could the presence of...

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...rolled up to keep them from the ground, the
waist of the coat below his haunches,...

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...plucked away the sheet. At sight of the contents, he uttered
one loud sob of such...

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...reeled, staggered, clutched at the table and held on, staring with
injected eyes, gasping with open...

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...world, I stood already committed to
a profound duplicity of me. Many a man would have...

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...separation of these elements.
If each, I told myself, could be housed in separate identities, life
would...

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...a
large quantity of a particular salt which I knew, from my experiments,
to be the last...

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...after all, nine tenths a life of
effort, virtue and control, it had been much less...

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...two appearances, one was wholly evil, and the
other was still the old Henry Jekyll, that...

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...stead,
quietly at home, trimming the midnight lamp in his study, a man who
could afford to...

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...vain I looked about me; in
vain I saw the decent furniture and tall proportions of...

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...an hour and in such a strange array; and ten
minutes later, Dr. Jekyll had returned...

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...interests and aspirations, and to become, at a blow
and forever, despised and friendless. The bargain...

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...and that I struck in no more reasonable spirit than that in
which a sick child...

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...life! with
what sincere renunciation I locked the door by which I had so often gone
and...

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...men, comparing my active good-will with
the lazy cruelty of their neglect. And at the very...

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...I had certainly
dragged him from his perch. At the inn, as I entered, I looked...

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...hated and feared the thought
of the brute that slept within me, and I had not...

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...energy of life, as of
something not only hellish but inorganic. This was the shocking thing;
that...

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...that unknown impurity which lent efficacy to the
draught.

About a week has passed, and I am...