The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 1

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

VOLUME I


_Of this SWANSTON EDITION in Twenty-five
Volumes of the Works...

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... 46

SAMBRE AND OISE CANAL: CANAL BOATS ...

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... ...

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...206


THE COUNTRY OF THE CAMISARDS

ACROSS THE LOZERE ...

Page 4

... ...

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...biographer, "a devotion, and also a cool headed admiration,
which he never lost." In a letter...

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...possessed
either meaning or actuality. Nobody was so unkind as to interpret the
significance of the questions...

Page 7

...from
his eighteenth month, is a chronicle of fever and ill-health, borne
always with heroic fortitude. His...

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...genius. He has
told of all this as only he could tell it.

As a boy, despite...

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...great authors of the past. He gave himself up to the
schools of Hazlitt, Lamb, Wordsworth,...

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...to the right reader, a perpetual feast, "a dreiping roast,"
and his style cannot be parodied....

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...not, and a path we do not understand. If some
benevolent genie, who understood Stevenson's qualities...

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...religious
disputes with a sire to whom he was devoted. The climate of his own
romantic town...

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...man, I may set myself peacefully on a smaller journey; not without
...

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...said later that I complained,
concerning Monsieur Paul de St. Victor, that he was "no sportsman,"
though...

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...to be financially independent, but, in the
Press, his independence could not be all that he...

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...things," that a few essays, two or
three short stories in a magazine, a little book...

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...at Fontainebleau, whom he wedded
at San Francisco (1880), and loved with all his heart.

Reconciled to...

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...the nature of things the History
of the Union would have become a romance, with that...

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..."put down by a Fin," and Mr. Rider Haggard and I were
actually paying (at least...

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...publish "Treasure
Island" in book form, being spirited up, I suppose, by Mr. Henley, who
was editing...

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...sensibility. "A pirate is rather a beast than
otherwise," says a young critic in "The Human...

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...in a paper-covered volume costing a shilling, and
was little heeded till a reviewer in _The...

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...and landscape;
in humour, dialogue, and creative power. As in his preceding stories,
there is hardly the...

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...dreamed
of "a story of many years and countries, of the sea and the land,
savagery and...

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...insolence," never cease to
amuse. Uncle Joseph is no caricature. But the world likes its
sensational novels...

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...and Islands after
1745. He was always haunted, and in popularity retarded, by History. He
wanted to...

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...and bought land there--Vailima--the last and
best of his resting-places; and here he was joined, in...

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...secret. He would
not divulge it, and when, after the voyage to the island and the
excitement...

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...good daughter of Clan Alpine
and of James Mor, onwards.

Stevenson excited a good deal of odium...

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...there were rhymes. One
was about a lady:

"Who beckled, beckled, beckled gaily."

Another...

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...any case, and under any
fashion, the great man produces beauty, terror, and mirth, and the
little...

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...permitted to him unwonted
activities. After a visit to Sydney, he took up "The Ebb-Tide" in
collaboration...

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...Samoans, by his family, by all who
had known him, and by many thousands who had...

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...remote contemporary watering-place, of local squireens, and
of a tragedy, mangled in deference to James Ballantyne....

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...true to his word, in spite of the
desire to avenge a brother, and of the...

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...may not be my strong point. I have found myself between no
less authorities than a...

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...of our voyage; that you should have had so hard a paddle to
recover the derelict...

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...moment in the portico, hat in
hand, and with an urbane demeanour.

It is best, in such...

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...slip. A crowd
of children followed cheering. The _Cigarette_ went off in a splash and
a bubble...

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...flute in literature; and not a man among us will go to
the head of the...

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...us in the gaslight
with a gleam of spectacles. For though handsome lads, they were all...

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...love, if there were no contempt to overcome?




ON THE WILLEBROEK CANAL


Next morning, when we set...

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...there
were no such thing as business in the world; and the man dreaming at the
tiller...

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...the Etna, in its covering of Flemish
newspaper. We landed in a blink of fine weather;...

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...more than
if they had been fishing in an old Dutch print. The leaves fluttered,
the water...

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...us, and something else
besides, not very clearly defined by him, but hopefully construed by his
hearers.

Sure...

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...frivolous
mercantile concerns of Belgium during the day; but in the evening they
found some hours for...

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...is more important than his services. And when
my Royal Nautical Sportsman shall have so far...

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...candles, and ordered
some brandy and water. The great billows had gone over our head. The
Royal...

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...to him in some heat of
official or popular distrust....

For the life of me I cannot...

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...stands in his door; the
colonel with his three medals goes by to the _cafe_ at...

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...where I hoped to go; and
as he listened, I declare the fellow sighed. Might not...

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...pipe in a flaw of fair weather.
But the wind blew so hard, we could get...

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...glossy black, came to
the edge to drink, and stood gravely twitching his ears at me...

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...sooner meet many wild animals than a
troop of healthy urchins.

But I was doing injustice to...

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..."trousered," as they call it,
would have a rarity in their eyes, as a thing coming...

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...in front, and looking back at us with
scared eyes. Not otherwise may the children of...

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...case, recommended us to a butcher who
lived hard by the tower, and took in travellers...

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...in France, that even before such judges we
could not beat them at our own weapons.

At...

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...not so easy in these ranks. A workman or a pedlar cannot shutter
himself off from...

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...just commenced, he was off to
spend them with his parents on a cruise. An enchanting...

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...cautious and
exact to a strange degree, and, if asked anything, he would sit and
think--and think,...

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...two sensible places
in a man--above all, if you should find a whole family living together
on...

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...way of Southampton, was
put down in Waterloo Station, and had to drive across Waterloo Bridge?
He...

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...by many
degrees in the quality of softness. Again, the smell of the sea has
little variety,...

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...come five minutes before or five minutes after,
unless you suppose an intention to affront you....

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...give me heart again. It
was truly fortifying to reproduce all the old man's insinuations, as...

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...at night in
the darkness, with the solid tramp of men marching, and the startling
reverberations of...

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...boats. Hundreds of persons, so said report, although it fitted ill
with our idea of the...

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...be thought a bit of a rogue with the
women!

As the evening went on, the wine...

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...each
at his own father's threshold, when and where might they next meet?

For some time past...

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...poor man's child." I would not say such
a thing to the Duke of Westminster. And...

Page 73

..._canaletti_ are only gypsies semi-domesticated. The
semi-domestication came out in rather a pretty form. Suddenly Madame's
brow...

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...was
yellow and turbulent, swung with an angry eddy among half-submerged
willows, and made an angry clatter...

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...objects of
sight went by at a dance measure; the eyesight raced with the racing
river; the...

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...I dwell upon it
with extreme complacency.

On one side of the valley, high up on the...

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...a
weir which could be shot, sometimes one so shallow and full of stakes
that we must...

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...the water of the
Oise in my trousers-pockets. You can never know, till you try it,...

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...course of the stream,
and darkness had fallen, and a late bell was ringing in Origny
Sainte-Benoite,...

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...of the sentiment redeemed
what was weak or wordy in the expression. The martial and the...

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...I was left to do the parade single-handed. I found
myself very much of a hero...

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...the wide selvage of the roadway. We had been very
merry with them a little while...

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...The night fell swiftly. Roadside trees and
disappointed sightseers, returning though the meadows, stood out in
black...

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...a good influence
in life while he was still among us; he had a fresh laugh,...

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...a petard
of a man; I think the devil was in him. He had two favourite
expressions--"it...

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...told some tales of his own prowess in keeping order:
notably one of a Marquis.

"Marquis," I...

Page 87

...rose very early to avoid a sympathizing deputation at our
departure, we found the hero up...

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...passed the word in English slang to the _Cigarette_.

In spite of the false scent we...

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...the others echoed her; and the hills about Origny repeated the
words, "Come back." But the...

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...from its
great preoccupation over its business of getting to the sea. A difficult
business, too; for...

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...of knick-knacks, embellished the public room. The
landlady was a stout, plain, short-sighted, motherly body, with
something...

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...the
poplared countryside! It made our mouths water. The inn bore the name of
some woodland animal,...

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...the heart boiling at the indignity? Try
it; try it only once; and tell me what...

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...a poplar and sup
off a loaf of bread. But right at the other end, the...

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...set us up again in our
own esteem. We had a thirst for consideration; the sense...

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...we could see
nothing but clay sides, and one willow after another. Only, here and
there, we...

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...broadly on the earth, it looks like
the poop of some great old battle-ship. Hollow-backed buttresses...

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...own doctor of divinity in the last resort.

As I sat outside of the hotel in...

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...shakes delinquent virgins by the elbow? why this
spitting, and snuffing, and forgetting of keys, and...

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...nothing of the voyage; it
was nothing but clay banks and willows, and rain; incessant, pitiless,
beating...

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...and fresh out of Champagne. Here ended the adolescence of the
Oise; this was his marriage-day;...

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...never forgotten that girl;
and I think she very nearly deserves a statue. To call her...

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...the interior of the
tower; and the gilded gentlemen rest from their labours with
contentment.

I had a...

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...by six, the day we were to leave. They had taken so little
note of us...

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...a city, we keep to ourselves, and never speak unless we have
trodden on a man's...

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...it
lost all merit in my eyes; only a single scene, or, as is the way...

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...you give in, as Walt Whitman would say, that you are any the
less immortal for...

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...to have no more intimate
relation to me than the canoe, or the river, or the...

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...their negotiation sounded thin and
querulous like that of sparrows on a winter's morning. The rare
passengers...

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...heaven. It was not without a gulp that I escaped
into the streets and the keen...

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...the real march
of life.

The church at Creil was a nondescript place in the inside, splashed...

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...There is a marked difference between decreeing light
in chaos, and lighting the gas in a...

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...are neither weak nor wicked. They can put up their
tablet commending Saint Joseph for his...

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...brother and sister, neither of whom
was out of their teens. The sister, so to speak,...

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...the show-woman caught a whisper of
this, she was down upon them with a swoop: if...

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...the money-box. He
has a pride of his own, and, what is of far more importance,...

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...upon by a village audience. Next night, as
soon as the lamps were lighted, there came...

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...a
guitar, and following Mademoiselle Ferrario's eyes with the obedient,
kindly look of a dog! The entertainment...

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...said M. de Vauversin, with a sweep of his
cigarette.

But what pleased me most was one...

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...took place during the
two or three acts that I sat out; but you will be...

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...thoroughfare in my
fiddle-case of a canoe, I also was beginning to grow aweary for my
ocean....

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...good reasons, he
will be the last to publish the result. The _Cigarette_ walked burthened
with a...

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...after the Franco-Prussian war.
Swiftly as men forget, that countryside was still alive with tales of
uhlans...

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...of the people of
hereabouts. An Englishman may do very well also; it will be something
new."...

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...behind in my valise."

_The Commissary:_ "You know, however, that it is forbidden to circulate
without papers?"

_The...

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...You are a German, and have come to
sing at the fair.)

_The Arethusa:_ "Would you like...

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...some ten francs of change: that was all. Not a
file, not a cipher, not a...

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...a green vine. The walls were of
naked masonry, the floor of bare earth; by way...

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...unassailable manner, in
apple-pie order, dressed not with neatness merely but elegance, ready
with his passport at...

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...in
his magisterial functions, a taste for letters, a ready admiration for
the admirable. And if he...

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...an end, the gentleman
proposed the acquaintance should be ripened in the _cafe_.

The _cafe_ was crowded...

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...had the best of luck to
the end. But we are all travellers in what John...

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...in Le
Monastier, when he might just as well have lived anywhere else in this
big world;...

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...for one; and at a pinch the thing might serve for two. I
could bury myself...

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...my mattress, or
self-acting bedstead on four castors.

I had a last interview with Father Adam in...

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...but there are stones on every roadside, and a man soon
learns the art of correcting...

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...with a sober daintiness of gait;
from time to time she shook her ears or her...

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...told him, I believed not.

Then, he supposed, we had come far.

I told him, we had...

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...the stream, as clear as crystal, lying in a deep pool between
them. Above and below,...

Page 140

...But the
incident saddened me, as did everything that spoke of my donkey's sex.

It was blazing...

Page 141

...That was in my old light days, before this trouble came upon
me. God knows at...

Page 142

...decent step that Modestine took must have cost me at least two
emphatic blows. There was...

Page 143

...the gathering dusk.

I returned for Modestine, pushed her briskly forward, and, after a sharp
ascent of...

Page 144

...accompaniment to dinner.

But the people of the inn, in nine cases out of ten, show...

Page 145

...knew what he was offering.

The sleeping-room was furnished with two beds. I had one; and...

Page 146

...of beauty.

"And where," said I, "is monsieur?"

"The master of the house is upstairs," she answered,...

Page 147

...upon the limit of Velay, and
all that I beheld lay in another county--wild Gevaudan, mountainous,
uncultivated,...

Page 148

...continued to descend, the
highlands of Gevaudan kept mounting in front of me against the sky.

I...

Page 149

...in marshy hollows, and began again sporadically on
hillsides or at the borders of a wood.

There...

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...sluts, with not a
thought but mischief. One put out her tongue at me, the other...

Page 151

...properly provided; but as this was to be
so short a stage, I had brought no...

Page 152

...is no affair of yours," I returned, for I was not going to indulge
his bestial...

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...I must camp." But the first thing was to return to Modestine. I
am pretty sure...

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...revolting beverage in itself. But
I was rare and hungry; ate well, and smoked one of...

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...been forced to camp
blindfold in the opaque night; and I had felt no other inconvenience
except...

Page 156

...before, running out of his house at sight
of me, with hands upraised in horror.

"My poor...

Page 157

...the morning on this delightful liquor, she having an
infinity of things to arrange, I was...

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...of the most beggarly countries
in the world. It was like the worst of the Scottish...

Page 159

...its array of chests and pair of ticking clocks, was the very
model of what a...

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...a station
standing ready built in Mende. A year or two hence and this may be
another...

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...Lady of the Snows. This it is to have had a
Protestant education. And suddenly, on...

Page 162

...he had been in a seminary with six young Irishmen, all
priests, long since, who had...

Page 163

...attend on
strangers that I was not a pedlar after all, I found no difficulty as...

Page 164

...North America and of New England in particular. As far as my
experience goes, there is...

Page 165

...bake
bread, and make cart-wheels, and take photographs; where one
superintends a collection of curiosities, and another...

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...have ever seen. As a matter of fact, on this bleak upland, and
with the incessant...

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...by hour, and sometimes quarter by quarter,
till eight, the hour of rest; so infinitesimally is...

Page 168

...of Rome. A stern simplicity, heightened by the romance of the
surroundings, spoke directly to the...

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...then, from a curious point of honour,
he would not accept it with his own hand....

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...we were thus agreeing, what should my tongue stumble upon but a
word in praise of...

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...myself. It was an odd but most
effective proselytizing. They never sought to convince me in...

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...soul to save; and here he was.

I am afraid I must be at bottom, what...

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..._The bed was made, the room was fit,
By punctual eve the...

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...precipitous village into the valley of the
Chassezac. This stream ran among green meadows, well hidden...

Page 175

...serious conflict with Modestine. She would none of
my short cut; she turned in my face;...

Page 176

...I had made my
arrangements and fed Modestine, the day was already beginning to
decline. I buckled...

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...and
feeling broad awake after this internal cold aspersion, sat upright to
make a cigarette. The stars...

Page 178

...barking of dogs at some very distant farm; but steadily and
gradually it took articulate shape...

Page 179

...steady wind, as long as a heavy sigh, poured
direct out of the quarter of the...

Page 180

...turf ascent a row of stone pillars, such
as had conducted me across the Goulet. It...

Page 181

...de Finiels, white ships
sailing by Montpellier and Cette. Behind was the upland northern country
through which...

Page 182

...muskets.

I had travelled hitherto through a dull district, and in the track of
nothing more notable...

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...to sun and air. The slopes were
steep and changeful. Oak-trees clung along the hills, well...

Page 184

...or
even Bleymard; but the difference existed, and spoke eloquently to the
eyes. The place, with its...

Page 185

...milk, without embarrassment or wonder, merely looking
at me steadily with her great eyes; and I...

Page 186

...was left for dead, and only succoured and
brought back to life by the charity of...

Page 187

...set
free the prisoners, and finding one of them in the _vine_, a sort of
Scavenger's Daughter...

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...at large, and restrained all the time by the
presence of the soldiery. Taken at length...

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...in the green; and
the sun so shone through and kindled the broad foliage, that each
chestnut...

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...unpleasantly exposed. One or two carts went by upon the
road; and as long as daylight...

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...of wind.

Sleep for a long time fled my eyelids; and just as I was beginning...

Page 192

...added, "come
along." And he and his son, without another word, turned oil to the next
chestnut-tree...

Page 193

...length.

I asked him what Seigneur he meant; but he only repeated the question
with more emphasis...

Page 194

...good old man, in the like manner I would
willingly go on to deceive others. And...

Page 195

...baskets. The
hills, however much the vale might open, were still tall and bare, with
cliffy battlements...

Page 196

...Camisards.

The landlord of the inn took me, after I had eaten, to an adjoining
cafe, where...

Page 197

...they had all
been sabring and shooting, burning, pillaging, and murdering, their
hearts hot with indignant passion;...

Page 198

...atop to please the
heart of the tourist.

It was difficult here again to find a spot...

Page 199

...for they are
themselves the most classical of poets. These same far-away worlds,
sprinkled like tapers or...

Page 200

...the clouds continued to run overhead
in an almost contrary direction. A few steps farther, and...

Page 201

...conventional meaning, change his mind.




THE HEART OF THE COUNTRY


I was now drawing near to Cassagnas,...

Page 202

...their intricate hills, the rustic
troop subsisted; and history can attribute few exploits to them but
sacraments...

Page 203

...long purses, and it might very well
enter into some one's head to deal you an...

Page 204

...four
hundred and sixty villages and hamlets were, with fire and pickaxe,
utterly subverted, a man standing...

Page 205

...march all afternoon; and the evening began early underneath the
trees. But I heard the voice...

Page 206

...nocturnal colouring.

At a certain point, as I went downward, turning many acute angles, the
moon disappeared...

Page 207

...all the assembly took to
their horses' heels, some east, some west, and the _cure_ himself...

Page 208

...pleasure, and felt light and quiet and content. But perhaps it was
not the place alone...

Page 209

...they call
it. It is made by putting the fruit whole into a cask with water;...

Page 210

...was a man of execution, and
loved his wife. He fell on Valleraugue, and got a...

Page 211

...and asked one fellow to explain.

"Making cider," he said. "_Oui, c'est comme ca. Comme dans...

Page 212

...capital,
where the local aristocracy had their town mansions for the winter; and
there is a certain...

Page 213

...custom of the past. Only on the occasion of the fair
shall you hear a drum...

Page 214

...again and
again, hour after hour; and I have known the sun to go down on...

Page 215

..._Monthly Visitor_ on the doings of Our Lady of Lourdes. I
remember one Sunday, when I...

Page 216

...pleasure: one to drink, another to
marry, a third to write scurrilous articles and be repeatedly...

Page 217

...then with every sort
of accent and inflection, but I seem to lack the sense of...

Page 218

...by
way of conversational adornment. My landlady, who was pretty and young,
dressed like a lady and...

Page 219

...employed it in
her works. The peasants, who knew nothing of letters and had never so
much...

Page 220

...to keep us at a distance, and it was
some seconds before we could persuade her...

Page 221

...perpetual tilting against squalls, there could scarcely
be found a more unhomely and harassing place of...

Page 222

...of
stage sovereign, sits among stage courtiers; a coach and six and
clattering escort come and go...

Page 223

...people will find a charm in a certain consonancy
between the aspect of the city and...

Page 224

...to be half deserted and
leaning towards decay; birds we might admit in profusion, the play...

Page 225

...a few years afterwards, David Hume
ruined Philosophy and Faith, an undisturbed and well-reputed citizen;
and thither,...

Page 226

...sufficiency of its
situation, and on the hills that back it up. If you were to...

Page 227

...which hangs imminent over Waverley Bridge would still put many
natural precipices to shame. The cellars...

Page 228

...Irish washings flutter
at the windows, and the pavements are encumbered with loiterers.

These loiterers are a...

Page 229

...the coat in which he had
played the gentleman three years before; and that was just...

Page 230

...stopped by hazard before a tall _land_. The moon touched
upon its chimneys, and shone blankly...

Page 231

...multitude
of people could exclaim with truth: "The house that I was born in fell
last night!"




CHAPTER...

Page 232

...old,
acknowledged prison-breaker; but the sun and the wind play freely over
the foundations of the jail....

Page 233

...Close": poor episcopal personages who were
done with fair weather for life! Some of the west-country...

Page 234

...gossip, to hear three parts of a
case and drink a glass of sherry, to long...

Page 235

...above. But
just now that tragic stage is empty and silent like a church on a
week-day,...

Page 236

...roaring tideways of the North. The common run
of mankind have, from generation to generation, an...

Page 237

...time
elapsed before a great robbery, an escape, a Bow Street runner, a
cock-fight, an apprehension in...

Page 238

...his staff, and his sister in gentler manner
hanged, and whether these two were simply religious...

Page 239

...is
a canvas for Hawthorne to have turned into a cabinet picture--he had a
Puritanic vein, which...

Page 240

...rather disjoin, in one
swelling, brutal babblement of noise. Now one overtakes another, and now
lags behind...

Page 241

...seem to
love for their own sake the emblems of time and the great change; and
even...

Page 242

...by cats. I have seen one afternoon, as
many as thirteen of them seated on the...

Page 243

...in the one, and an insulting epithet in
the other. The proper inscription for the most...

Page 244

...by an enthusiastic people. In the long arm of the churchyard that
extends to Lauriston, the...

Page 245

...Heads and that Hand; and Day
being come, they went quickly...

Page 246

...Day of the Week on which most
of them were executed,...

Page 247

...to think of death, unless we
temper the thought with that of heroes who despised it....

Page 248

...Arthur's Seat and shine upon
the spires and monuments and the green tree-tops in the valley....

Page 249

...another for the citizen, from the thick of his affairs, to
overlook the country. It should...

Page 250

...at the bottom of a deep valley, among rocks and
between gardens; the crest of either...

Page 251

...when we hit in our excursions on the
butt-end of some former hamlet, and found a...

Page 252

...dust. And as long as we have the hills
and the Firth, we have a famous...

Page 253

...manage to be
offensive, without being contemptible; and we know that "fools rush in
where angels fear...

Page 254

...But
the chief feature is an unfinished range of columns, "the Modern Ruin"
as it has been...

Page 255

...than temperate summer. The breeze comes off the sea, with a
little of the freshness, and...

Page 256

...the Pentlands.--To complete the
view, the eye enfilades Princes Street, black with traffic, and has a
broad...

Page 257

...the east of the Inchcape is that Forfarshire coast
where Mucklebackit sorrowed for his son.

These are...

Page 258

...pass and re-pass below the stationary lights upon the
bridge. Lights burn in the Jail. Lights...

Page 259

...and to swallow something hot
to the stomach, are benefits so easily appreciated where they dwelt!

And...

Page 260

...in
a man's inside; and the look of a tavern, or the thought of the warm,
firelit...

Page 261

...season in the
words. The reverberation of the snow increases the pale daylight, and
brings all objects...

Page 262

...the city? For at this
season, on the threshold of another year of calamity and stubborn
conflict,...

Page 263

...pockets!

Of old, Edinburgh University was the scene of heroic snowballing; and
one riot obtained the epic...

Page 264

...the south alone, it keeps rising, until
it not only out-tops the Castle, but looks down...

Page 265

...all moulded into innumerable glens and shelvings and
variegated with heather and fern. The air comes...

Page 266

...the evening with
"Over the Hills and Far Away," to an accompaniment of knowing glances.
And at...

Page 267

...up all night in lone places on the hills, with Bibles
and tremulous psalms, they will...

Page 268

...first a grange of Whitekirk Abbey, tilled and
inhabited by rosy friars. Thence, after the Reformation,...

Page 269

...have only to look at the cut,
to see how near it is at hand. But...

Page 270

...in the dry grass, seem not so much to
interrupt, as to accompany, the stillness; but...