The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 6

By Robert Louis

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...Transcriber's note: Hyphenation inconsistencies were left unchanged.




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... ...

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... ...

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... 109
XVII. NARRATIVE CONTINUED BY THE...

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...THE EBB-TIDE RUNS ...

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... ...

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... ...

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... 320
VIII. THE WAGES OF PHILOSOPHY ...

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...of the
island, and that only because there is still treasure not yet lifted, I
take up...

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...had inquired what inns there were along
the coast, and hearing ours well spoken of, I...

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...who had never had but the one leg, and that in the middle of his
body....

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...of man that made England
terrible at sea.

In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin...

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...the thought had been mingled
in my nightmares with that of the one-legged seafaring man. But...

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...held his peace that evening, and for many evenings to come.




CHAPTER II

...

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...said he, "my mate Bill would be called the captain, as like as
not. He has...

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...alarmed, as you may fancy, and it rather added to my
fears to observe that the...

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...of it!" he cried once. And again, "If it
comes to swinging, swing all, say I."

Then...

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...shall we do? Where is he wounded?"

"Wounded? A fiddle-stick's end!" said the doctor. "No more...

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...mind you," said the doctor, "I clear my conscience--the name of rum
for you is death."

And...

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...by
the doctor's words, now quoted to me, and rather offended by the offer of
a bribe.

"I...

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...me, or unless you see that Black Dog again, or a seafaring man with
one leg,...

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...bodily weakness, more violent than ever.
He had an alarming way now when he was drunk...

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...began to obey him at once, walking straight in at the door and
towards the parlour,...

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...understand, for I had certainly never liked the man, though of
late I had begun to...

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...help we were likely
to get in that quarter. For--you would have thought men would have...

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...noiseless and swift, nor did we see or hear anything to
increase our terrors, till, to...

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...a twinkling.

A strong smell of tobacco and tar rose from the interior, but nothing was
to...

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...have seemed suspicious, and would bring the whole
hornets' nest about our ears; though how thankful...

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...than crawl below it. So
there we had to stay--my mother almost entirely exposed, and both...

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...to the door of the inn. "Bill's been overhauled
a'ready," said he; "nothin' left."

"It's these people...

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...the word for it, Pew's anger rose so high at these
objections; till at last, his...

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...found its way to Supervisor Dance,
and set him forth that night in our direction, and...

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...to him or squire. Master Pew's
dead, when all's done; not that I regret it, but...

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...stiff, and told his story like a
lesson; and you should have seen how the two...

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...Port-of-Spain."

"Well, I've heard of him myself, in England," said the doctor. "But the
point is, had...

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...few cases, to be sure, the name of a place would be added, as "Offe
Caraccas;"...

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...and by E.

"Ten feet.

"The bar silver is in the...

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...a physician to take charge of his practice; the squire was hard at
work at Bristol;...

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...himself found the _Hispaniola_, and by the most admirable
management got her for...

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...rid of two out of the six or seven I had already
engaged....

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...J. T.

"_P.P.S._--Hawkins may stay one night with his...

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...and his old brass telescope. Next
moment we had turned the corner, and my home was...

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...note addressed to John
Silver, at the sign of the "Spy-glass," and told me I should...

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...a start.

"Oh!" said he, quite loud, and offering his hand, "I see. You are our...

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...I.
Yet I kind of think I've--yes, I've seen the swab. He used to come here
with...

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...a precious old sea-calf I am!" he said at last, wiping his
cheeks. "You and me...

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... CHAPTER IX

POWDER AND ARMS


The _Hispaniola_ lay some way out, and we went...

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...Trelawney) the secret
has been told to the parrot."

"Silver's parrot?" asked the squire.

"It's a way of...

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...be sure, he was so loose a talker; yet
in this case I believe he was...

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...Mr. Arrow stood by
superintending.

The new arrangement was quite to my liking. The whole schooner had...

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..."Admiral Benbow" when I had half the work; and I was
dog-tired when, a little before...

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...to solve
it; and when we asked him to his face, he would only laugh, if...

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...in the galley, which he kept
as clean as a new pin; the dishes hanging up...

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..."She'll lie a point nearer the wind than a man
has a right to expect of...

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...around the sides of the ship.

In I got bodily into the apple-barrel, and found there...

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...hundred pound in a
year, like a lord in Parliament. Where is he now? Well, he's...

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...a mate brings a slip on his cable--one as knows me, I
mean--it won't be in...

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...you want to know, I'll
tell you when. The last moment I can manage; and that's...

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...you think? Put 'em ashore like maroons? That
would have been England's way. Or cut 'em...

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...brightness fell upon me in the barrel, and, looking
up, I found the moon had risen,...

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...things--names and heights and soundings--with the single
exception of the red crosses and the written notes....

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...let me speak. Get the
captain and squire down to the cabin, and then make some...

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...the whole
details of Silver's conversation. Nobody interrupted me till I was done,
nor did any one...

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...know. It would be pleasanter to come to blows. But
there's no help for it till...

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...that we could
both see and hear foaming and thundering on the steep beach--at least,
although the...

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...nothing of
the house or stockade, for they were quite buried among trees; and if it
had...

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...him the chance. Let's
allow the men an afternoon ashore. If they all go, why, we'll...

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...only six were left, it was equally plain that the cabin party had
no present need...

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...or
evergreen, oaks, I heard afterwards they should be called--which grew low
along the sand like brambles,...

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...little green dell beside the marsh, and closely set about
with trees, where Long John Silver...

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...a black
conscience that can make you feared of me. But, in heaven's name, tell me
what...

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...cut short, a moment since, before my eyes.

But now John put his hand into his...

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...of a pine. What it was, whether bear
or man or monkey, I could in no...

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...it was exposed, was
burnt by the sun; even his lips were black; and his fair...

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...did, the pious woman! But it were Providence that put me
here. I've thought it all...

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...is, would he be likely to come down to the toon of, say one
thousand pounds...

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...the man of this
island, light and dark, fair and rain; and sometimes he would, maybe,
think...

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...one--three bells in the sea phrase--that the two
boats went ashore from the _Hispaniola_. The captain,...

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...space,
and then the thing was completed by a paling six feet high, without door
or opening,...

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..."here are two of us with a brace of pistols each.
If any one of you...

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...rest of the arms and powder we dropped overboard in
two fathoms and a half of...

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...to breathe.

In the second place, the ebb was now making--a strong rippling current
running westward through...

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...had been left behind, and a stroke with an axe would
put it all into the...

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...good pace for a boat so
overloaded, and we had shipped but little water in the...

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...brush
one's clothes, but not entirely fitted for a man of war.

With all this in our...

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...were already examining him; and I saw with half an
eye that all was over.

I believe...

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..."in how many weeks do you and squire expect the
consort?"

I told him it was a...

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...they put more trust in Israel's gunnery.
For four or five of them were busy carrying...

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...you'll say), a precious sight more
confidence'--and then nips him."

And he pinched me the third time...

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...It was the last of the cannonade.

I lay for some time, watching the bustle which...

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...the sand. Very close
around the stockade--too close for defence, they said--the wood still
flourished high and...

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...lie in human
nature. Was it cheese you said he had a fancy for?"

"Yes, sir, cheese,"...

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...truce!" I heard some one say; and then, immediately after, with
a cry of surprise, "Silver...

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...word from you's
enough. I know a gentleman, and you may lay to that."

We could see...

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...my man, better say it," said the captain.

"Right you were, Cap'n Smollett," replied Silver. "Dooty...

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...but now he pulled himself together.

"Like enough," said he. "I would set no limits to...

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...you. Tramp, my lad. Bundle out
of this, please, hand over hand, and double quick."

Silver's face...

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...two again; and on the
north side, five. There was a round score of muskets for...

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...very tight and a frown on his face.

So some seconds passed, till suddenly Joyce whipped...

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...log-house.

The four who had boarded made straight before them for the building,
shouting as they ran,...

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...the top and
thrown a leg across. Well, so short had been the interval, that when...

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...PART V

MY SEA ADVENTURE




CHAPTER XXII

HOW I BEGAN MY SEA...

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...the name of Davy Jones," said he, "is Dr. Livesey mad?"

"Why, no," says I. "He's...

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...wrong. But I was only a boy, and I had made
my mind up.

Well, as things...

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...her peak.

Alongside lay one of the gigs, Silver in the stern-sheets--him I could
always recognise--while a...

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...now that I had found the boat, you would have thought I had had
enough of...

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...knew her way."

Certainly I did not know her way. She turned in every direction but...

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...in former days. The other was, of course, my friend of the red
night-cap. Both men...

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...hand over hand on the cord, and, when I judged myself near
enough, rose at infinite...

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...narrows for the open sea.

Suddenly the schooner in front of me gave a violent yaw,...

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...of the shore and the high
running of the surf, was more than enough to disgust...

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...for all that.
First, moving with all care, I gradually baled out the coracle with my
sea-cap;...

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...and I could do nothing
but stare and wonder.

The _Hispaniola_ was under her main-sail and two...

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...as it banged about; and still no soul appeared upon her
decks. I could not choose...

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...that I was left without retreat on the _Hispaniola_.




CHAPTER XXV

I STRIKE...

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...by little, hid from me; and at
last I could see nothing beyond his ear and...

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...gave Hands the brandy.

He must have drunk a gill before he took the bottle from...

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...an infernal lubber,
after all. I can see, can't I? I've tried my fling, I have,...

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...island to the mouth
of the North Inlet. Only, as we had no power to anchor,...

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...was prompt with my answer, however, for I saw where my
advantage lay; and that with...

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...I had not been
idle with my body. I had stolen back to the cabin, slipped...

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...but lay east and west, so that the schooner must be nicely handled
to be got...

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...a sudden disquietude seized upon me, and made me turn my head.
Perhaps I had heard...

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...beating heart as
now. Still, as I say, it was a boy's game, and I thought...

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...more than a third of the way up. Then,
with a pistol in either hand, I...

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...both shot and drowned, and was food for fish
in the very place where he had...

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...a sack of bran, and with one good heave
tumbled him overboard. He went in with...

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...same time the sun went fairly
down, and the breeze whistled low in the dusk among...

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...impatiently drew near
to the stockade. Yet, as I began to thread the grove that lies...

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...that danger with so few to mount guard.

By this time I had got to the...

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...more recently
dressed. I remembered the man who had been shot and had run back among
the...

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...friends, then, were still alive, and though I partly
believed the truth of Silver's statement, that...

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...of us
wounded. As for that boy, I don't know where he is, confound him,' says
he,...

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...me, decide whether he were laughing at my
request, or had been favourably affected by my...

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...you in this here
house, and what I say is this: let me see him that'll...

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...I see you was the right sort. I says to
myself: You stand by Hawkins, John,...

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...of the torch.
Silver briefly agreed; and this emissary retired again, leaving us
together in the dark.

"There's...

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...to that."

But here the long man with the yellow eyes struck in.

"Belay that talk, John...

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...a hornpipe in a rope's end at Execution Dock by London town, it
does. But who...

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...a hostage when it comes to that. And as for number two, and
why I made...

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...who was
evidently uneasy at the curse he had brought upon himself.

"A Bible with a bit...

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...I
ran to a loophole and looked out, I saw him standing, like Silver once
before, up...

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...not to lose a man for King George (God bless him!) and
the gallows."

The rogues looked...

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...roundly accused of playing double--of trying to make a separate peace
for himself--of sacrificing the interests...

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...better man! And you'll not forget what I done good, not any more
than you'll forget...

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...adventures, and he heard me out in silence.

"There is a kind of fate in this,"...

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...we were alone, "if I saved your life, you saved
mine; and I'll not forget it....

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...him for that;
but it's over and done. I'll take him in a line when we...

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...brandy for the
midday meal. All the stores, I observed, came from our stock; and I...

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...cleft of the Spy-glass.
Thence, bending to our left, we began to ascend the slope towards...

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...creeper that had
gradually enveloped his remains) the man lay perfectly straight--his feet
pointing in one direction,...

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...He's dead, and he don't walk,
that I know; leastways, he won't walk by day, and...

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... Yo-ho-ho, and a bottle of rum!"

I never have seen men more dreadfully affected...

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...much dollars, for a boosy old seaman with a blue mug--and him dead,
too?"

But there was...

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...it was soon plain to me that
the lad was falling sick; hastened by heat, exhaustion,...

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...hard for me to keep up with the
rapid pace of the treasure-hunters. Now and again...

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...His looks were now quite friendly; and I was so
revolted at these constant changes, that...

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...at him in the
last agony, "George," said he, "I reckon I settled you."

At the same...

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...from him, on the afternoon of the
attack, and when, next morning, he saw the anchorage...

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...Inlet, what should we
meet but the _Hispaniola_, cruising by herself? The last flood had lifted
her;...

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...captain; and that was all he said.

What a supper I had of it that night,...

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...of the three surviving mutineers.

At last--I think it was on the third night--the doctor and...

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...must say, of Ben Gunn, and with the strong
approval of Gray. We left a good...

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...Spanish America, for we could not risk the voyage
home without fresh hands; and as it...

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...suddenly smit with the
desire to rise, also studied his profession; and he is now mate...

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...along beside the river was a high thoroughfare
between two splendid and powerful societies. All through...

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...downward to the unknown world.

One evening he asked the miller where the river went.

"It goes...

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...trenched along the shining
heavens. An overmastering emotion seized upon the boy, soul and body; his
heart...

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...the same that sent Columbus into the desolate Atlantic,
inspired and supported these barbarians on their...

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..."And, O
fish!" he would cry, "if you would only turn your noses down stream, you
could...

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...him at first, began to take on
a colour of gravity, and the nocturnal summons and...

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...find all things right in your cities. That is not what troubles
me; it might have...

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...we are no nearer
them. All we can do is to stand down here in the...

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...that would have made any man well
contented.

Will had never seen much of her; for although...

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...her in an agreeable dismay. She looked, even in
her quietest moments, so complete in herself,...

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...with its cities and silver river; everything was asleep, except a
great eddy of birds which...

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...away with great delight to Will, although a
bystander might scarce have found it out. He...

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...look at them with quite an
easy heart."

"You wish to possess them," replied Will, "in order...

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...he began abruptly; "and
after having turned it all over, I have made up my mind...

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...proud to say your mind," he said. "Believe me
that's a pity. A clean shrift makes...

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...with a swift
glance and an angry flush upon her cheek.

"You will perhaps have the good...

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...latter burst forth from time to time with an unruly violence, and
then he would forget...

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...as a man can be.
He rather stinted himself the pleasure of seeing her; and he...

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...seasons
made an epoch; the fish hung in the swift stream, the birds circled
overhead, the pine-tops...

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...kept stalwart and firm to the
last; but they say he grew less talkative towards the...

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...conscious of another
noise besides the brawling of the river and the ringing in his feverish
ears....

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...and, above that, a few black
pine-tops, like so many plumes.

"Master Will?" asked the new-comer, in...

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...stick by your inn. Now I
mean you shall come for a turn with me in...

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...physician," said Will, looking steadfastly upon his
guest.

"I am a natural law," he replied, "and people...

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...never forget his arrival in that room; for not only was the scene
picturesque, but the...

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...would give him no peace; he seemed profoundly
indifferent to what was going on, or rather...

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...is a little pagan," said the landlady. "For that matter, they are all
the same, these...

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...the behaviour of both birds and fishes, the look
of the plants in his garden, the...

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...After he had watched a mile or
so of the clear water running by before his...

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...to have bread,
there comes so plain a want of it. And then they beat me...

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...curious gentleman?" he asked.

The Doctor threw away his stick, bounded on the boy, clasped him...

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...come!" cried the Doctor. "Possibly you are a performer yourself?"

"I sing better than that," replied...

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...and
have no ground of jealousy, filled the cup of her nature to the brim.
Those who...

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...is like you--to take
credit for the thing you could not help."

"My dear," returned the Doctor...

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...opera, and the
boulevard, and my social relations, and all that was my life before I
knew...

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...and declared the farce over. Then he took Jean-Marie by the
shoulder and led him out...

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...water-lily and listen to the
bells, which must sound most delicately down below. That would be...

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...went out for his last breath
of air before retiring for the night, she came over...

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...exact, erudite, a
literary article; but it would hardly have afforded guidance to a
practising physician of...

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...not unhappy, over his
unfinished tasks, she would snatch her opportunity in the Doctor's
absence, go over...

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...a crapulous human
ruin snuffing, dash from him his box! The judge, though in a way...

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...queen. From their station
on the slope the eye embraced a large space of poplared plain...

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...new, free from the alarms of war, with the green country at the
door, without noise,...

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...convince a boy, whom you
supply with all the facts for the discussion. And besides, there...

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...about capsizing with him. "Because," said
he--affecting deliberation after an obvious pause--"because I have formed
my life...

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...a great way off between the poplars!--in how many village streets,
tied to a gate-post! This...

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...the writer of that letter from my heart;
he was a man of thought on the...

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...year. The thought drives one
frantic."

"It is only money," replied Jean-Marie. "It would do harm."

"Oh, come!"...

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...away a great pad of moss from between these
boulders, and disclosed a crevice; and when...

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...the table, so that we may keep an eye
upon things."

They tied the horse, and entered...

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...creative, not
poetic; and yet he will repay your study; his fortune is vast, and is
entirely...

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...a fixture on the driving-seat, to guard
the treasure; while the Doctor, with a singular, slightly...

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...he had spoken.

"Ours in this sense, that they are nobody else's," replied the Doctor.
"But the...

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...turtle!" cried the Doctor; and he pushed her
towards the kitchen, lantern and all.

Jean-Marie stood dumfoundered....

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...Faint veils of mist
moved among the poplars on the farther side. The reeds were quietly
nodding....

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...yourself, command your feelings. I
would not have you give way to passion like the vulgar....

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...itself by some occult observer, and
dogged throughout the day with a skill and patience that...

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...a man
likely to be in the forest idling, I require a man of education, I
require...

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...as eating, and the Doctor recounted what had
happened in his richest narrative manner. Casimir heard...

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...have chosen such another. Beginning life
with mountebanks and thieves, passing onward to the society and
friendship...

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...'There he is!' You need not like it, but you have no manner of
right to...

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...who deals with money, my dear, is a man lost."

With Jean-Marie the process of reconciliation...

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...Jean-Marie is
the proud possessor of a fashionable kepi. Besides, we had a glass of
Hermitage last...

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...the long-headed, dirty-handed boor from
whom he had himself acquired it at a ruinous expense. As...

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...nature is a toy." A letter came to him; but, as its arrival coincided
with the...

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...instantly made night hideous
with her shrieks.

By this time the hamlet was alarmed, lights flashed from...

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..."I will put them on."

She took the detested lendings in her hand once more; but...

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...three days the snow continued to fall, and the ruins, covered with
tarpaulin and watched by...

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...say no more," he replied. "Though, to be sure, if you
had consented to indue----_A propos_,"...

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...Doctor stretched out his arms to her. "Ruined," he replied, "you are
ruined by your sinister...

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...his remarks as if
he were alone in the bosom of his family; and with every...

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...followed by
the man of business. Boy and hamper were both in a most sorry plight;...