The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 2

By Robert Louis

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...Transcriber's note: A few typographical errors have been corrected: they
are underlined in the...

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... STEVENSON



...

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... ...

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... 115
...

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... II. THE PETRIFIED FOREST ...

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... A STARRY DRIVE ...

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...SOUTH ...

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... _TO
...

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...one who had come aboard might have supposed we were all
absconding from the law. There...

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...had a
choice between tea and coffee for beverage; a choice not easy to make,
the two...

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...to the same quarter of the deck.
Who could tell whether I housed on the port...

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...some fencing, that he
was born in England; and ultimately proved to be an Irishman born...

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...wait for the exact moment ere she started it
again. When she imagined this was about...

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...to rights. He was always hovering round inventions like a bee
over a flower, and lived...

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...nature of emigration. Day by day throughout the
passage, and thenceforward across all the States, and...

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...starving
girls. But I had never taken them home to me or represented these
distresses livingly to...

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...the rails, while the ship
went swinging through the waves; and I admired and envied the...

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...surprised to find
them so dainty in their notions. I myself lived almost exclusively on
bread, porridge,...

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...the brass
and the beautiful sea-cry, "All's well!" I know nothing, whether for
poetry or music, that...

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...don't want to fight, but, by
Jingo, if we do," was in some measure saved by...

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...across this
hurly-burly of the winds and waters as ever at home upon the summer
woods. The...

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...carrying happiness about with him
in his fiddle-case, and he seemed alive to the fact.

"It is...

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...quick, jigging figure in a
set of quadrilles, and had never heard it called by name....

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...disperse such solid blackness. When
Jones and I entered we found a little company of our...

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...down C;
...

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...I saw in a clear flash what an
involved and hideous tragedy was a disaster to...

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...gentleman and two young ladies, picking their way with
little gracious titters of indulgence, and a...

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...fellow.
Rumours and legends were current in the steerages about his antecedents.
Some said he was a...

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...Nelson" under such contrarious
circumstances. He was by trade a shearer of ship plates; but he...

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...his drunken
wife, all his sound-hearted pluck and varied accomplishments depressed
and negatived.

Was she dead now? or,...

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...same time
fleeing from his destiny and carrying it along with him, the whole at an
expense...

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...He was a dry, quick, pertinent
debater, speaking with a small voice, and swinging on his...

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...except in the way of a few useful
handbooks, made nothing worth the while. He produced...

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...of culture;
that a narrow and pinching way of life not only exaggerates to a man...

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...all the passengers; he was the first who fell to
dancing. From Loch Foyle to Sandy...

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...Jones, the young O'Reilly, and myself were walking arm-in-arm
and briskly up and down the deck....

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...that was his smoking-room of a
night. Let me call him Blackwood. O'Reilly and I rattled...

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...a little while before in
the close, tossing steerage: "O why left I my hame?"

Meantime Jones,...

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...den allotted him.

At the foot of our own companion, just where I had found Blackwood,
Jones...

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...monkey trick.

In the morning, my first thought was of the sick man. I was afraid...

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...tea
and a spice loaf. But he laughed to scorn such counsels. "_I'm_ not
afraid," he had...

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...I
encountered on Liberton Hill, near Edinburgh, an Irish labourer trudging
homeward from the fields. Our roads...

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...hand of violence.




...

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...added colouring of rhetoric and
rodomontade, must have been the style of Burns, who equally charmed...

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...I crossed the Atlantic, one
miserable stowaway was found in a dying state among the fuel,...

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...trade, and
for months he had hung round with other idlers, playing marbles all day
in the...

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...was need of no more: Alick was in another bunk before the
day was older. Shortly...

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..."You leave me alone,"
was his deduction. "When I get talking to a man, I can...

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...round your neck.
The Devonian lost heart at so many refusals. He had not the impudence...

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..."I'm not
breaking my heart with it," he remarked.

Once there was a hatch to be opened...

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...his tone, "mind you, that's a good boy. He
wouldn't tell you a lie. A lot...

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...the
more dangerous in that he was far from bold, but seemed to woo in spite
of...

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...hulking fellow dog-sick, and this delicate, sad woman caring
for him. He seemed, from first to...

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...of their own character and experience, but with
some curious information. One, a mason himself, believed...

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...taken ill on
deck. I think I had the luck to be present at every sudden...

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...and day by day greedier for small delicacies. Such
was the result, as I fancy, of...

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...wine, will not
bear transportation for a hundred miles, nor from the parlour to the
kitchen. To...

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...rarely seemed to me either willing or careful
thinkers. Culture is not measured by the greatness...

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...in itself nothing, and may as well be left undecided, if there be no
wisdom and...

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...tapping of the mallets would
cease, and thus the neighbourhood be advertised of their defection.
Hence the...

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...the talk is over they often leave the matter where it was. They
mark time instead...

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...of the millionaire who
sits apart in an office, like Von Moltke, and only directs the
manoeuvres...

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...struck.
Then they applied themselves to find a lodging, and walked the streets
till two, knocking at...

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...as they passed him; and they were so pleased to
be once more in the open...

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...of
reasons, even the best cigar often failing to please if you smoke
three-quarters of it in...

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...south in autumn,
returning with the spring to find thousands camped upon their marshes,
and the lamps...

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...two borrowed lights; one, looking into the passage,
and the second opening, without sash, into another...

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...asking my age, my
business, my average income, and my destination, beating down my
attempts at evasion,...

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...said
farewell to them as they lay a pulp in the middle of a pool upon...

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...to the South Seas, and have asked me to add
a preface to the volume. But...

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...no emigrant train on Sunday, a great part of the
passengers from these four ships was...

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...no longer
answerable for their acts. It mattered not what they were carrying, they
drove straight into...

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...running many
knots, and heralding their approach by strains of music. The contrast
between these pleasure embarkations...

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...to follow their example.

_Tuesday._--When I awoke, it was already day; the train was standing
idle; I...

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...to the counter.

Our American sunrise had ushered in a noble summer's day. There was not
a...

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...be enriched, his pages sing spontaneously, with the names of
states and cities that would strike...

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...and me,
we had enjoyed a very pleasant conversation; he, in particular, had
found much pleasure in...

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...fences
along the line bore but two descriptions of advertisement; one to
recommend tobaccos, and the other...

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...evening. I was turned out of the cars, bundled
into an omnibus, and driven off through...

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...first, I saw him knit his brows at me like
one who has conceived a doubt;...

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...among revolvers, and I observed it with some
emotion. The conductor stood on the steps with...

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...insolence of Jack-in-office.

I was nettled by the coloured gentleman's refusal, and unbuttoned my
wrath under the...

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...stove and a convenience, one at either end, a passage
down the middle, and transverse benches...

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...honest, but how was he to know that? There was another
young man whom he had...

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...of sentiment as you would expect from a retired
slaver, turned with a start and bade...

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...want of
borrowers. Each filled the tin dish at the water filter opposite the
stove, and retired...

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...to the charge, and then Jack-in-office looked me
coolly in the face for several seconds and...

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...thinks he is only earning a profit of a few
cents, and that perhaps exorbitant, he...

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...no bigger
than a crown-piece, bloomed in a continuous flower-bed; grazing beasts
were seen upon the prairie...

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...he can
hope for. He may walk five miles and see nothing; ten, and it is...

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...to accept it for a piece of reality; and
it seems incredible that life can go...

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...good circumstance in that God-forsaken
land.

I had been suffering in my health a good deal all...

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...drinking,
quarrelling, and murdering like wolves; how the plumed hereditary lord
of all America heard, in this...

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...afternoon; droave the cattel a
little way; when a prairie chicken alited a little way from...

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...days, when the men
that owned the cattle said they would (could) not drive them another
inch....

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...as Dean Swift; a kind of leering
human goat, leaping and wagging your scut on mountains...

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...he's not going to die!"
cried a woman; "it would be terrible to have a dead...

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...New
York, from far western Iowa and Kansas, from Maine that borders on the
Canadas, and from...

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...men emigrate, how
many thousands would regret the bargain! But wages, indeed, are only one
consideration out...

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...are held to be base because their dexterity and
frugality enable them to underbid the lazy,...

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...knows if we had one common thought or fancy all that
way, or whether our eyes,...

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...the thought of
the American, is not disgraceful to the nature of man; rather, indeed,
honourable, since...

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...make it broader,
with which I here endow the public. It is brief and simple--radiantly
simple. There...

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...to a country where situations went a-begging.
But I am not so sure that the offer...

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...off their sense of dirt and heat and
weariness, and bawled like schoolboys, and thronged with...

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...bend; and Monterey itself is
cosily ensconced beside the barb. Thus the ancient capital of California
faces...

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...other things are now for ever altered--and
it was from here that you had the first...

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...of hue, but smiling and fat,
and he carried an axe, though his true business at...

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...rocks, a world of surge and screaming sea-gulls. Such scenes are
very similar in different climates;...

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...in the spreading roots. Thus, after the light, showy, skirmishing
flames, which are only as the...

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...walk up to a great pine
tree in a portion of the wood which had escaped...

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...remain till day returns; and before
the sun's rays they slowly disperse and retreat in broken...

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...sex.

There was no activity but in and around the saloons, where people sat
almost all day...

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...entirely
human, but altogether sad.

The town, then, was essentially and wholly Mexican; and yet almost all
the...

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...The
agent had the curiosity to visit him some time after and inquire what
possible use he...

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...the subject, they seemed
not to understand my surprise; they had forgotten the traditions of
their own...

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...disgrace
of California; and the holders are mostly of American or British birth.
We have here in...

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...those typical instances which
explains the prevailing discontent and the success of the demagogue
Kearney.

In a comparison...

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...up with
joy than the faces of these Indian singers. It was to them not only...

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...name from San Francisco.

Whether or not it was here that Drake put in in 1597,...

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...looking down on San
Francisco, like Arthur's seat on Edinburgh.

Thus, in the course of a generation...

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...extent and complication; that fires spring
up readily, and served by the unwearying trade-wind, swiftly spread;
that...

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...or bulbous--telling of a country where the
trees are not as our trees, and the very...

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...a man standing watchfully at a street-corner with a long
Smith-and-Wesson glittering in his hand behind...

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...it is in the
same street that you yourself inhabit in another quarter of the town.

The...

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...their fall; everywhere the
same out-at-elbows, many-nationed loungers at dim, irregular grog-shops;
everywhere the same sea-air and...

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... ...

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...and the soil, where it is bare, glows
warm with cinnabar.

Life in its shadow goes rustically...

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...round about the icy Horn,
this crowd of great, three-masted, deep-sea ships come, bringing
nothing, and return...

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...and then wood began to clothe their sides; and soon we were away
from all signs...

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...the life and most of the houses of Calistoga are
concentrated upon that street between the...

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...how one of his horses fell at a ticklish passage
of the road, and how Foss...

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...County is
dotted with spas; Hot Springs and White Sulphur Springs are the names of
two stations...

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... ...

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...house of the
proprietor, and another smaller house hard by to serve as a museum,
where photographs...

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...so would you, if you was cleaning up pasture."

And now he had a theory of...

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... ...

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...than the precious ores, that yield inimitable fragrance
and soft fire; those virtuous Bonanzas, where the...

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...the fagots.

A Californian vineyard, one of man's outposts in the wilderness, has
features of its own....

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...penniless barber, and even
after he had broken ground up here with his black malvoisies, continued
for...

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...a Chinaman to cook for them, and who waved their hands to us as we
drove...

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...in my heart of hearts I long to be
buried among good Scots clods. I will...

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...suddenly, as he was calmly
entering my cottage, his mind quite evidently bent on plunder: a...

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...ISRAEL




...

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...Foss could hardly bring us milk.
To take a cow would have involved taking a field...

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...proportionately sad. One fine morning, however, he met me, wreathed
in smiles. He had found the...

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...at night, to remind us
of the hour. But it was eight before we got clear...

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...oak is no baby;
even the madrona, upon these spurs of Mount Saint Helena, comes to...

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...rises behind. There is just room for the road and a sort
of promontory of croquet...

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...hole there in the
hill"--a hole, pure and simple, neither more nor less--Kelmar and his
Jew girls...

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...about a furlong we followed
a good road along the hillside through the forest, until suddenly...

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...floor, a spray of poison
oak had shot up and was handsomely prospering in the interior....

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...bees and
nested in by song-birds; and the mountains standing round about, as at
Jerusalem. Here, mountain...

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...journal, and after we were in
bed, under a cloudless, starset heaven; and so it was...

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...so large a
measure and so free from after-thought; almost they persuaded me to be a
Jew....

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... ...

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...country-woman troubles and alarms upon the journey; how in the
bank at Frankfort she had feared...

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...a
scale, it is none the more intrinsically inhumane for that. The village
usurer is not so...

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...we went,
crossing the valley by a grassy trail; and there lunched out of the
basket, sitting...

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...grotto in a fairy
story. A stream of water, fed by the invisible leakage from our...

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... To S. Chapman, Cr.
...

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...colour of Gregory's
Mixture, but rosier; and as there were several of the bags, and each
more...

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...beginning of despair. The one bright arrow of day, in that gaunt and
shattered barrack, made...

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...the rest of us
were greatly revived and comforted by that good creature--fire, which
gives us warmth...

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...us. It could scarce be called a house-warming; for
there was, of course, no fire, and...

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...approach of winter,
when these supplies failed, built great fires in the forest, and there
died stoically...

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...school-board,
and when I was there, he had recently lost the schoolhouse key. His
waggon was broken,...

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...information on
the subject, just as I could never find out, in spite of many inquiries,
whether...

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...conversation upon us with great liberality. He prided himself on his
intelligence; asked us if we...

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...sunshine. Yet he was as cowardly as he was
powerful, and felt no shame in owning...

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...of the family, at so much a day, was too bald an
imposition, and at length,...

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...sober, open-air
attitude of mind, seeing the world without exaggeration--perhaps, we may
even say, without enough; for...

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...silence of the universe, to which he did not
listen, dwelling with delight on the sound...

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...coughing and
sneezing, under fathoms on fathoms of grey sea-vapour, like a cloudy
sky--a dull sight for...

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...seaboard, and climbed so high among
the mountains. And now, behold, here came the fog to...

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...which rapidly engulfed
whatever mounted--our own little platform in the canyon must have been
already buried a...

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...second, the bough of a
dead pine beckoned out of the spray like the arm of...

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...the Hansons up the hill. The
traffic on the road was infinitesimal; only, at rare intervals,...

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...a
bishop, is to rise to new ideas. But, alas! there was no Patterson about
the Toll...

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...credible; the thrill of the great shower of letters from
the post-bag, the childish hope and...

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...sleepers of the Toll House dozed back to
their accustomed corners. Yet a little, and the...

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...of tan; and he first backed out for more money; and
then, when that demand was...

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...waggonful and, swimming low among
the trees, we beheld a strange, misshapen, waning moon, half tilted...

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...came home to Silverado.

The moon shone in at the eastern doors and windows and over...

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...below, and seen the
sun lying broad among the wreck, and heard the silence broken only...

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...manner, the whole
affair, mine, mill, and town, were parts of one majestic swindle. There
had never...

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...and
make Silverado his. This, with a sort of quiet slyness, Rufe told me at
an early...

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...in abeyance in the case of Ronalds.

That same evening, supper comfortably over, our guest busy...

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...champagne had ceased to flow, the population was
already moving elsewhere, and Silverado had begun to...

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...She fled under a cloud of words; and
when I had made sure that she was...

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...was not a proper place, nor the subject one suitable
for squaws, and I, following his...

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...the history of that mine became once more plunged in darkness,
lit only by some monster...

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...country townships sat
so close together along the line of the rail. But here there was...

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...the canyon half the day.

To walk at all was a laborious business; the foot sank...

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...hundreds of tons of
mountain bury the scene of our encampment.

I have already compared the dump...

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...made a big snow-bed just above the well. The shoulder of the
hill waved white with...

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...pleased the
world. Two great birds--eagles, we thought--dwelt at the top of the
canyon, among the crags...

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...to that of snakes.

One person, however, better served by his instinct, had known the
rattle from...

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...with sunshine. His long hind
legs were stiff, his tiny forepaws clutched upon his breast, as...

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...the sky was one
dome of blue, and the pines below us stood motionless in the...

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...and quiet us;
and in the pastures of the dusk we stand, like cattle, exulting in...

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... "VIRGINIBUS PUERISQUE"

...

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...or praise. Meanwhile, many things have
changed, you and I among the rest: but I hope...

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...they are only human after all; they know what gins
and pitfalls lie about their feet;...

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...on the
other; and you have not to fear so many contingencies; it is not every
wind...

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...with wonder that so many marriages are passably
successful, and so few come to open failure,...

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...was always equally dull and spiritless,
and possession equally cold. I cannot help fancying most people...

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...guide simple folk in their selection. Now what should
this principle be? Are there no more...

Page 208

...that is plentiful,
but courage that is rare. And what have we in place? How many,...

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...the end.

A certain sort of talent is almost indispensable for people who would
spend years together...

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...their own reason, and have to be reminded of
what lies without by specious and clamant...

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...brush. And, again, painters may work out of doors; and
the fresh air, the deliberate seasons,...

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...below their feet. Desperate pilots, they run
their sea-sick, weary barque upon the dashing rocks. It...

Page 213

...he is already
old and honoured, and Lord Chancellor of England. We advance in years
somewhat in...

Page 214

...and
foolhardy as this one of marriage. For years, let us suppose, you have
been making the...

Page 215

...that your wife suffers, no one is responsible but you. A man
must be very certain...

Page 216

...of their deities, and consciously performed their part
in life before those marble eyes. A god...

Page 217

...pose for a hero to the lackey who has found you out? In
this temptation to...

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...better to face the fact, and know, when you marry that you take
into your life...

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...nay, in the partial fall and
but imperfect triumph, of the younger hero.[3] Without some such...

Page 220

...to encourage and console.


FOOTNOTE:

[3] Browning's "The Ring and the Book."


...

Page 221

...had not yet
suspected the existence. Falling in love is the one illogical adventure,
the one thing...

Page 222

...is more to the purpose) strong, healthy,
high-strung, and generous natures, of whom the reverse might...

Page 223

...turned his back
upon the strong sunny parts of nature, and accustomed himself to look
exclusively on...

Page 224

...first blush is certainly
difficult to explain. It comes (I do not quite see how) that...

Page 225

...own sentiments. It is an understood thing in the play, that while
the young gentlefolk are...

Page 226

...although it may have been a very difficult
thing to paint the marriage of Cana, or...

Page 227

...having. Love, in particular, will
not endure any historical scrutiny: to all who have fallen across...

Page 228

...the play is over, when the thirty years'
panorama has been withdrawn in tatters from the...

Page 229

...very honest fellow, and live truly with his wife
and friends; while another man who never...

Page 230

...partially true even with the tongue we learned in childhood. Indeed,
we all speak different dialects;...

Page 231

...voice breaks and changes, and speaks by unconscious and
winning inflections; we have legible countenances, like...

Page 232

...the strength of a general air, and now and again, when we see
the spirit breaking...

Page 233

...the process of excusing one. It is really a most delicate
affair. The world was made...

Page 234

...her heart.

"It takes," says Thoreau, in the noblest and most useful passage I
remember to have...

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...Let but a doubt arise, and alas! all
the previous intimacy and confidence is but another...

Page 236

...is _too wise_; that is to say, being likewise put
into English, _not...

Page 237

...have Columbus, who may have
pioneered America, but, when all is said, was a most imprudent
navigator....

Page 238

...but if he has really
considered the world and drawn a conclusion, he has travelled as...

Page 239

...time when I was a Socialist
with something like regret. I have convinced myself (for the...

Page 240

...condition in life, and say we have studied it; our most elaborate
view is no more...

Page 241

...of power has more to do with the wise resolutions of
age than we are always...

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...be
any dessert or not. If there be such a thing as imprudence in the world,
we...

Page 243

...theory about wild oats; and a man who has not had his
green-sickness and got done...

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...over-long about the playbox; he
had to blush if he was found among his lead soldiers;...

Page 245

...a strong way of
stating that the current truth is incomplete. The follies of youth have
a...

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...by must be the centre, with a champagne luncheon and a
piece of ornamental water. How...

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...to lend our musical
voices.


FOOTNOTE:

[5] "Lothair."




...

Page 248

...of the subject, it is not the
greatest. You could not be put in prison for...

Page 249

...willingly part with such
scraps of science, I do not set the same store by them...

Page 250

...it does not fall into one of your
scholastic categories. An inquiry must be in some...

Page 251

...than these. I mean his wisdom. He who
has much looked on at the childish satisfaction...

Page 252

...would suppose there was
nothing to look at and no one to speak with; you would...

Page 253

...or season your dinner with good company? Colonel Newcome helped to
lose his friend's money; Fred...

Page 254

...a better
thing to find than a five-pound note. He or she is a radiating focus...

Page 255

...student to
his book; and no one been any the wiser of the loss. There are...

Page 256

...spirit as we let it fall.
We shall now have an opportunity of finishing many pleasant...

Page 257

...not a turn of the averted head, to indicate that she has been
even conscious of...

Page 258

...gardens
and the blue sea. Nothing can change the eternal magnificence of form of
the naked Alps...

Page 259

...the rainy streets
towards afternoon; the meagre anatomy of the poor defined by the
clinging of wet...

Page 260

...always characteristic
of the dress of these southern women, will come home to him
unexpectedly, and awaken...

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...the general effect, and brings some refinement of
its own into the character of the pleasure...

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...The happiness of such an one comes to depend
greatly upon those fine shades of sensation...

Page 263

...restful and easy, until sleep overtakes us at a stride and we move
no more, so...

Page 264

...increase or diminish, by one half loaf, the
equable sufficiency of his own supply. Thus there...

Page 265

...which, in a certain far-away sense, belongs to us,
than about the real knot of our...

Page 266

...cases--we so collect
about us the interest or the love of our fellows,...

Page 267

...was so fitfully pursued, and which is
now so ineffectively to end?




...

Page 268

...the solemnity of mortal conditions than if they were
delving gardens in the greenest corner of...

Page 269

...certain distance, every step
we take in life we find the ice growing thinner below our...

Page 270

...not, in the highest sense of human speech,
incredible, that we should think so highly of...

Page 271

...properly speaking,
love life at all, but living. Into the views of the least careful there
will...

Page 272

...before he comes to that. Whether we regard life as
a lane leading to a dead...

Page 273

...and faint into the parlour with the regulated temperature;
and the tin shoes go equably forward...

Page 274

...it were not to die, and yet be
the patient spectators of our own pitiable change!...

Page 275

... EL...

Page 276

...the like in any province of experience--would not that
man be in a poor way for...

Page 277

...travel or to
gathering wealth. Problem gives rise to problem. We may study for ever,
and we...

Page 278

...of the legions
into a dangerous river--on the opposite bank the woods were full of
Germans--when there...

Page 279

...that the sea is English. Even where it is
looked upon by the guns and battlements...

Page 280

...could not overlie the spirit and gaiety of our sailors; they did
their duty as though...

Page 281

...whose youth has been
depressed by exceptionally aesthetic surroundings, can understand and
sympathise with an admiral or...

Page 282

...of great size, and
flannel underclothing. In the same spirit, Nelson went into Aboukir with
six colours...

Page 283

...own scalp torn open by a piece of langridge shot. Hear him again at
Copenhagen: "A...

Page 284

...great deal of drubbing." The
captain and crew thought they had done about enough; but Greenville...

Page 285

...soul to do nothing in particular,
than would carry on all the wars, by sea or...

Page 286

...often surprised between
the hedge and the ditch; he must run the hazard of his life...

Page 287

...the
personal motive in these fine sayings and doings, which I believe to be
true and wholesome....

Page 288

...not likely to take much trouble in reviewing
their sentiments and the words in which they...

Page 289

...Scotsman of two generations ago. The
moment was well chosen, neither too late nor too early....

Page 290

...sits
looking out upon you with inimitable innocence, and apparently under the
impression that he is in...

Page 291

...seen in looking round a room full of
living people. But it was not so with...

Page 292

...because it supplies us with the materials for
wisdom. It is probably more instructive to entertain...

Page 293

...had defied
him in these words: "It is altogether unavailing for your lordship to
menace me; for...

Page 294

...dignity of a beak with
the good-nature of a bottle, and the very double chin with...

Page 295

...with a large cap," which
are done in the same frank, perspicacious spirit as the very...

Page 296

...and tell myself a hunter's story, would have made it
more palatable than the best of...

Page 297

...the maturer growth. Smell and
hearing are perhaps more developed; I remember many scents, many voices,
and...

Page 298

...other children, they almost invariably show
some intelligent sympathy. "There is a fine fellow making mud...

Page 299

...clumsiest substitutes and can swallow the most staring
incongruities. The chair he has just been besieging...

Page 300

...one
would feel in certain circumstances; to make sure, he must come as near
trying it as...

Page 301

...runs, and sets the blood agog over all his
body. And so his play breathes him;...

Page 302

...with sugar, and explained it to be a
country continually buried under snow. I took mine...

Page 303

...conflict between two Arabian nations.

To think of such a frame of mind is to become...

Page 304

...open
self-deception, and we expect him to be as nice upon a matter of fact as
a...

Page 305

... ...

Page 306

...in the nature of a
picnic. A walking tour should be gone upon alone, because freedom...

Page 307

...walks fast, with a keen look in his eyes,
is all concentrated in his own mind;...

Page 308

...And
notice how learned he is (as, indeed, throughout the essay) in the
theory of walking tours....

Page 309

...content.

Nor must I forget to say a word on bivouacs. You come to a milestone...

Page 310

...time when business habits are more
mitigated than on a walking tour. And so during these...

Page 311

...themselves before you, now as a laughable farce, and now
grave and beautiful like an old...

Page 312

...two degrees of the infinitesimally small, such as a
tobacco-pipe or the Roman Empire, a million...

Page 313

...such a conflagration, to which
the fire of Rome was but a spark, that we do...

Page 314

...as a child who,
looking upon lovely things, looks lovely. Some leap to the strains with
unapt...

Page 315

...Nature because they fear the
hand of Nature's God! Shrilly sound Pan's pipes; and behold the...

Page 316

...from time to
time, was doubtless very helpful; the stars had a cheery look among the
chimney-pots;...

Page 317

...and its supper-parties were no
longer at the mercy of a few miles of sea-fog; sundown...

Page 318

...the monstrous city flashes into vision--a glittering hieroglyph many
square miles in extent; and when, to...

Page 319

... ...