The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 9

By Robert Louis

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...Transcriber's note: Hyphenation inconsistencies were left unchanged.




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... 36

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... PAGE
The Jenkins of Stowting--Fleeming's grandfather--Mrs. Buckner's
...

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...wedding--Death
of Uncle John--Death of Mr. and Mrs. Austin--Illness and death
...

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... ...

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...I have read that there is an immediate and lively contact between
the dominant and the...

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...to look when I find
myself in company with an American and see my countrymen unbending...

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...excursion into England. The
change from a hilly to a level country strikes him with delighted
wonder....

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...travels back in fancy to his home. "This is no' my ain
house; I ken by...

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...immodest.
That you should continually try to establish human and serious
relations, that you should actually feel...

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...us, from the peer to the ploughboy, binds us more nearly
together. No Englishman of Byron's...

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...different classes, and in the competition of study
the intellectual power of each is plainly demonstrated...

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...itself than between the countries.
Galloway and Buchan, Lothian and Lochaber, are like foreign parts; yet
you...

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...his will in
other terms, is otherwise divorced and married; his eyes are not at home
in...

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...some remains of good, for human institutions decline by
gradual stages; but decline, in spite of...

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...knew what they had lost, would regret also. They have still Tait,
to be sure--long may...

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...that scarce became him; he somehow lacked the means: for all
his silver hair and worn...

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...that, perhaps, even upon this
I should plume myself, that no one ever played the truant...

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...He was sane, his senses were undisturbed;
he saw clearly, and knew what he was seeing,...

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...other by the windows of a quiet hotel; below, under a steep
cliff, it beholds the...

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...all that he has learned to recognise. The tumultuary and
grey tide of life, the empire...

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...upon the cheerless fields of Obermann. Yet to
Mr. Matthew Arnold, who led him to these...

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...not without respect, like old family servants. Here is indeed a
servant, whom we forget that...

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...His wull," indicating
Heaven, "I would hae likit weel to hae made out the fower hunner."...

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...the palace
of our life.


III

One such face I now remember; one such blank some...

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...finding interests; to his
last step gentle, urbane, and with the will to smile.

The tale of...

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..."in the vast cathedral leave him;
God accept him,
Christ receive him!"


...

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...dialogues, in which I played
many parts; and often exercised myself in writing down conversations
from memory.

This...

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...Webster; in the second draft of the same piece, with
staggering versatility, I had shifted my...

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...of language, he should long have practised
the literary scales; and it is only after years...

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...in defiance of Senatus-consults, he can smoke. The Senatus looks
askance at these privileges; looks even...

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...good society, always with empty pockets. The charm of his
manner may have stood him in...

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...and doubtless
ambition spoke loudly in his ear, and doubtless love also, for it seems
there was...

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...meet my share in the expense. It
was a comfortable thought to me that I had...

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...sake of the man whom it purports dimly to represent
and some of whose sayings it...

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...from the garden
in the lap of the hill, with its rocks overgrown with clematis, its
shadowy...

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...receive_." Ay, and
even when, by extra twisting of the screw, we prevailed on him to...

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...no one else had been
favoured with a like success. All other gardeners, in fact, were...

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...and Gospel ethics; until they had struck deep root into his
heart, and the very expressions...

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...one to the other. Perhaps Robert's originally tender
heart was what made the difference; or, perhaps,...

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...home are dear in
particular to all men. This is as old as Naaman, who was...

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...and had been all his days faithful to that curlew-scattering,
sheep-collecting life. He remembered the droving...

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...the calumet with
the Red Indian, a part of the heraldry of peace; and at length,...

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...at last the use of that great wealth of names for every
knowe and howe upon...

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...waifs. It was that afternoon the forty pounds were offered and
refused. And the shepherd and...

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...the fine
_dilettante_, but the gross mass of mankind, when they leave off to
speak of parlours...

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...by the throat, unearthly
harpings of the wind along the moors; and for centre-piece to all...

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...dance, at least by children; flower-plots
lying warm in sunshine; laurels and the great yew making...

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...to young eyes. I cannot depict (for
I have no such passions now) the greed with...

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...so he
decided with a touch of irritation. And just then the phaeton coming
opportunely to the...

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...grandfather remembered and once reminded me. I
have forgotten, too, how we grew up, and took...

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...the health and the beard of the
great Cardinal Beaton; I have shaken a spear in...

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...or murder to be done, on
the playground of their youth. But the memories are a...

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...other, where you
shall be able to mark on a clear surfy day the breakers running...

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...strange to see Earraid on the Sunday,
when the sound of the tools ceased, and there...

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...pillars quivered and
sprang under the blow. It was then that the foreman builder, Mr.
Goodwillie, whom...

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...the while I was aware that this life of sea-bathing and
sun-burning was for me but...

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...convinced provincial; putting
up for years at the same hotel where his father had gone before...

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...the sea proved too strong for man's
arts; and after expedients hitherto unthought of, and on...

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...It is a curious enough circumstance, and a great
encouragement to others, that a man so...

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..."The Parent's
Assistant," of which he never wearied. He was a strong Conservative, or,
as he preferred...

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...Celtic trait that his affections and emotions,
passionate as these were, and liable to passionate ups...

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...A jest intervenes, the solemn humbug
is dissolved in laughter, and speech runs forth out of...

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...truth that are the best of education. There is nothing
in a subject, so called, that...

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...sunset.

Natural talk, like ploughing, should turn up a large surface of life,
rather than dig mines...

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...human
being ever spoke of scenery for above two minutes at a time, which makes
me suspect...

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...the less giddy and inspiriting. And in the life
of the talker such triumphs, though imaginary,...

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...all luminous in the admired disorder
of their combination. A talker of a different calibre, though...

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...similar themes; the one glances high
like a meteor and makes a light in darkness; the...

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...in the end. And there is something singularly engaging, often
instructive, in the simplicity with which...

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...has
something of the tragedy of the world for its perpetual background; and
he feasts like Don...

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...the best kind of talk
where each speaker is most fully and candidly himself, and where,...

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...the conscientious gentleman. I feel never quite
sure of your urbane and smiling coteries; I fear...

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...earnest for a
god. Talk might be to such an one the very way of moral...

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...have gone, we
will go also, not very greatly fearing; what they have endured unbroken,
we also,...

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...under his chin--and for
that he never failed to apologise, for it went sore against the
traditions...

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...Edinburgh Theatre, the idea of producing
Shakespeare's fairy pieces with great scenic display. A Moderate in
religion,...

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...so set apart from envy, fear, discontent, or any
of the passions that debase; a life...

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...shrinking readiness, one-third loath, for a repetition of
the discipline.

There are few women, not well sunned...

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...of business or
conduct, any actual affair demanding settlement, a woman will speak and
listen, hear and...

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...OF DOGS


The civilisation, the manners, and the morals of dog-kind are to a great
extent subordinated...

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...degree of frenzy, and radically devoid of truth. The day of an
intelligent small dog is...

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...scouting even along the street
for shadows of offence--here was the talking dog.

It is just this...

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...parody that charming ease. For to be a high-mannered and high-minded
gentleman, careless, affable, and gay,...

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...A thorough elaborate gentleman, of the plume and sword-knot
order, he was born with a nice...

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...the nursery,
saluted the whole family, and was back at home in time for breakfast and
his...

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...every sign of
levity in the man whom he respected, he announced loudly the death of
virtue...

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...his rise into
society he laid aside these inconsistent pleasures. He stole no more, he
hunted no...

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...courtiers round a monarch, steeped in the
flattery of his notice and enriched with sinecures. To...

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..._The Blind Boy_, _The Old Oak
Chest_, _The Wood Daemon_, _Jack Sheppard_, _The Miller and his...

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...our hand ere we
were trusted with another; and, incredible as it may sound, used to
demand...

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...hardly to
be called good reading. Indeed, as literature, these dramas did not much
appeal to me....

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...enchanted calendar that I still at times
recall, liked a loved verse of poetry: _Lodoiska_, _Silver...

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...an Oriental string: he held the gorgeous East
in fee; and in the new quarter of...

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...the shadows of the characters I
was to read about and love in a late future;...

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...book that has its hour of
brilliancy--glows, sings, charms, and then fades again into
insignificance until the...

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...to the two financiers. My next
reading was in winter-time, when I lived alone upon the...

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...Cristo," or its own elder brother, the "Trois
Mousquetaires," I confess I am both pained and...

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..."getting ugly"; and no disease is more difficult to
cure. I said authors; but indeed I...

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...light as a whipped trifle, strong
as silk; wordy like a village tale; pat like a...

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...philosophie de Planchet lui ayant paru solide, il y reva._" In a
man who finds all...

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...into a man so witty, rough, kind, and
upright, that he takes the heart by storm....

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...passions to appear
authentically, it may even seem inadequate from first to last. Not so to
me;...

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...striding along the beach; he,
to be sure, was a pirate. This was further afield than...

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...by our surroundings. It would be hard to say which of
these modes of satisfaction is...

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...place where Keats wrote some of his "Endymion" and
Nelson parted from his Emma--still seems to...

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...realisation and the apotheosis of the day-dreams of
common men. His stories may be nourished with...

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...I know not why, to look
somewhat down on incident, and reserve their admiration for the...

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...in a farm kitchen. Up to that moment he
had sat content, huddled in his ignorance,...

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...there is another volume extant
where you can breathe the same unmingled atmosphere of romance. It...

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...remember
rightly, that so bewitched my blacksmith. Nor is the fact surprising.
Every single article the castaway...

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...the more imperiously do they thrust us back into our
place as a spectator. I cannot...

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...foreland of Dunrossness--moving, with the
blood on his hands and the Spanish words on his tongue,...

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...English, or bad style; it is abominably bad narrative
besides.

Certainly the contrast is remarkable; and it...

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...excite no great surprise; but one point in which they
seem to agree fills me, I...

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...Gibbon or the chipped phrase of Charles Reade, the
principles of the art of narrative must...

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...impression of reality and
passion. Mr. James utters his mind with a becoming fervour on the
sanctity...

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...from the gross, coloured
and mobile nature at our feet, and regard instead a certain figmentary
abstraction....

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...material, as a shoe must still consist of
leather, but by its immeasurable difference from life,...

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...against too narrow a conception of experience; for the born
artist, he contends, the "faintest hints...

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...characters may be statically shown. As
they enter, so they may go out; they must be...

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...of "The Author of Beltraffio" must be
broken open; passion must appear upon the scene and...

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...brushes, the palette, and the north light. He
uttered his views in the tone and for...

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...men,
working upon great motives, what we observe and admire is often their
complexity, yet underneath appearances...

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... [20] 1884.

[21] Now no longer so, thank Heaven!




MEMOIR OF FLEEMING...

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...to the
proper summit of any Cambrian pedigree--a prince; "Guaith Voeth, Lord of
Cardigan," the name and...

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...family. From this point of
view I ask the reader's leave to begin this notice of...

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...the speed of Captain may have come sometimes handy. At
an early age this unconventional parson...

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...with De Grasse. While at sea, Charles kept a journal, and made
strange archaic pilot-book sketches,...

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...the Jenkin family until her death in 1825, when it
dissolved and left the latest Alnaschar...

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...were also kinsfolk: and the parties "under the great spreading
chestnuts of the old fore court,"...

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...with an admiral.
"I was not a little proud, you may believe," says he.

In 1814, when...

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...that
Charles Jenkin, coming too late for the epic of the French wars, played
a small part...

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...on deck at
night; and with his broad Scots accent, "Well, sir," he would say, "what
depth...

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...consultation with any other officer, Captain Jenkin
(then lieutenant) returned the man to shore and took...

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...and one of the
daughters married no less a man than Clarkson Stanfield. But by the
father,...

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...while far lovelier women were left
unattended; and up to old age, had much of both...

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...inherent and inextinguishable either by age,
suffering, or injustice. He looked, as he was, every inch...

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...bless
him, surely with some remorseful feeling; for when the will was opened
there was not found...

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...was much pleased
with your lecture, but why did you hit me so hard with Conisure's"
(connoisseur's,...

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...a member of the family; she was in distress of mind and
reduced in fortune by...

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...was
only an echo from his mother, but it shows the atmosphere in which he
breathed. It...

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...with a
lad of this character, cutting the teeth of his intelligence, he was
sure to fall...

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...passing by the office of Foreign Affairs, where Guizot lives, and
where to-night there...

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...entrance upon life
for a little English lad, thus to play the part of...

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...he wanted them; but he said he would not fire on them. Then they asked
...

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...all across the road. We went through a great
many little streets, all strongly...

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...frightened, but it turned me sick at
heart, I don't know why. There has...

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...Republican party seems the strongest, and are going about with red
ribbons in their...

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..."Bonnie Dundee"; and now, to the
chanting of the mob, he amazed his family by learning...

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...de
Clichy the report of the cannon sounded close to our ears and made our
hearts sick,...

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...of Paris; the same
year Fleeming was to write, in answer apparently to a question of...

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...whom he loved but
yet mistrusted.

But this is to look forward; these were the days not...

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...they
resumed their return home. On the way they saw men running and
vociferating, but nothing to...

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...in the ugly form of
a bombardment; and that evening the Jenkins sat without lights about
their...

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...did he think, as he set down his
gratitude, how much, in later life and among...

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...his mother's boy; and it was fortunate
his mother was not altogether feminine. She gave her...

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...Fairbairn's--Experience in a
strike--Dr. Bell and Greek architecture--The Gaskells--Fleeming at
Greenwich--The...

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...that, when one was driven home, the others started from their
places; the whole spirit of...

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...weave, and the slender ship to brave
and to outstrip the tempest. To the ignorant the...

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...loving-kindness
to his mother. For some time he spent three nights a week with Dr. Bell,
"working...

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...ideas, a process that many of his
later friends will understand and, in their own cases,...

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...with dirty stories, and seeking
to suit himself with his surroundings or (as he writes it)...

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..."I keep my own little lodgings," he
writes, "but come up every night to see mamma"...

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...his choosing was directed well. Or are we to
say that, by a man's choice in...

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...sport and study by a partial mother. Bred an
attorney, he had (like both his brothers)...

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...Eliza, who learned under his care to
be a sound Latin, an elegant Grecian, and to...

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...the house. There was in the
society of the Austins, outward, stoical conformers to the world,
something...

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...not blindly, but with critical
discrimination; not in the fashion of Romeo, but, before he was...

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...was;
a boy in heart and mind; and it was with a boy's chivalry and frankness
that...

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...Greek play?"

It was at this time besides that he made the acquaintance of Professor,
now Sir...

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...round which
hang twenty or thirty rusty Irish, playing pitch and toss and waiting
for employment;--on along...

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...rigid formulae of conduct. Iron-bound, impersonal ethics,
the procrustean bed of rules, he soon saw at...

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...marriage." And
again in 1885, after more than twenty-six years of marriage, and within
but five weeks...

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...his own petulance the woman who was to him the symbol of
the household and to...

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...the past. And his courage and
energy were indefatigable. In the year 1863, soon after the...

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...seems to cheer the vanity
of the most incompetent; but a correction accepted by Darwin, and...

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...I tidied up
the coach-house to my own and Christine's admiration. Then encouraged
...

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...you wonder that I love you?

"_Nov. 17._--... I am very glad we married...

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...out quite long enough.... I am reading Don Quixote
chiefly, and am his fervent...

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...so slightly worded that I paid no heed.
This is a good measure of his courage...

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...for a while now and then, but not for a
lifetime. What I have...

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...---- having a contract to lay down a
submarine telegraph from Sardinia to Africa...

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...came here drawing, ordering, and putting up the
machinery--uninterfered with, thank goodness, by any...

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...belts slip away, as if nothing held them. Men begin to
look queer; the...

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...hardly liked to claim the compliment by
acknowledging it.


"_SS. Elba,...

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...generally useful person. A---- was a great comfort during the miseries
[of the gale];...

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... authority to do this; and when Newall heard of it, he appointed
another...

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... carried ashore pick-a-back, and plucked the first flower I saw for
Annie. It...

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...purple, and when opened there are rays of yellow adhering to
the inside; these...

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...its way. On
our return we found the boat had been unsuccessful; she was...

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...hills and sea, with good wholesome work to do. Pray that all go well
...

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...well, and that will be another nervous
operation. Fifteen miles are safely in; but...

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...about a mile. The machinery has behaved admirably. O
that the paying-out were over!...

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...the _Elba's_ bows rise and
fall about 9 feet. We make twelve pitches to...

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...on board through
the agency of a wretched old peasant who watches the end...

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...oleander. We get six sheep, and many fowls too, from the
priest of the...

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...bottom
seems to teem with life.--But now we are startled by a most
...

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...at the grapnel. I wonder if there ever was such a scene of confusion;
...

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...the sand. This attempt was rather silly
after the experience we had gained at...

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...in allowing the ship to drift slowly across the line where
you expect the...

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...another disadvantage:
they weaken the cable very much.--At about six o'clock [P.M.] we had
...

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...so, or, more probably still,
it will part of its own free will or...

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... II

I have given this cruise nearly in full. From the notes, unhappily
imperfect, of two...

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...the huge Venetian galleys used to lie in
wait. High above all, higher and...

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...tanks,
ruins and desolation at our feet. The ancient Arsinoe stood here; a
...

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...to
our assistance, but of course very slowly, and much time was occupied
...

Page 207

...the guardians put on board to see that we held no
communication with the...

Page 208

...whole year, with the exception of one day sacred
to their patron saint. The...

Page 209

...distinction in
the manner.


"_Cagliari, October 5, 1860._

"All Tuesday I spent...

Page 210

...well pleased; he
can speak English and Italian well, and has been two years...

Page 211

...behind thick
clouds capping the hills; I pondered on you and enjoyed it all.

...

Page 212

...sea and masking those confounded marshes at the back.
One would have thought the...

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...5 in great glory. I soon
came to the conclusion there was a break....

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...complete break, a
quarter of a mile off. I was amazed at my own...

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...to the shore, and go to
Spartivento to see what had happened there. I...

Page 216

...October 1st. But when we got to Norderney, we found the _Caroline_
with shore-end...

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...last. But not long. A Mr. F----
washed my face and hands and dressed...

Page 218

...by and by slipped out
past the long pier with so little stir, that...

Page 219

...twenty miles of her; when
suddenly up went the fog, out came the sun,...

Page 220

...letters that come later are to be sent to
Pernambuco by first mail.... My...

Page 221

...trees, but I think I like the
negresses best of anything I have seen....

Page 222

...where college professors and the lawyers of the Parliament House
give the tone, and persons of...

Page 223

...laws of metre, drawing, acting,
directing private theatricals, going a long way to see an actor--a...

Page 224

...the
family stood first; a man was first of all a child, nor did he cease...

Page 225

...too hard for them;
only, if there was any principle of science involved, they must
understand the...

Page 226

...9th._--Frewen is deep in parachutes. I beg him not to drop from
the top...

Page 227

...my affair.
Education of that kind!... I would as soon cram my boys with...

Page 228

...was
got with educational intent; and it served its purpose so well, and the
boys knew their...

Page 229

...the passage. Their setting out was indeed
merely tentative; but presently they had gone too far...

Page 230

...the folk had prettily named her
from some silver ornaments--was a "_geborene Graefin_" who had married
beneath...

Page 231

...particulars. It often entertained him with the discovery of strange
survivals; as when, by the orders...

Page 232

...shall never forget
with what coldness he heard and deleted the eloquence of our draft, nor
with...

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...her husband; he spent hours hearing and
schooling her in private; and when it came to...

Page 234

...been costumed by the
professional costumier, with unforgettable results of comicality and
indecorum; the second, the _Trachiniae_...

Page 235

...he would have said himself) with the
same headlong zest. I give in the Appendix[28] a...

Page 236

...one of our
discussions. I said it was a dangerous error not to admit there were...

Page 237

...of fancy-fair swindle. Of the
others, many who came to scoff remained to take raffle tickets;...

Page 238

...who sat under his ministrations in a soul-chilling
class-room at the top of the University buildings....

Page 239

...quite unmoved; he had no pity for me.--"You are no
fool," said he, "and you chose...

Page 240

...the stairs, "I engage you--like a lady to
dance--for the end of the evening. You have...

Page 241

...belong to--I hope they
will belong to the great community." I should observe that as time...

Page 242

...like hovering Victory in some design of a Greek battle, the
truth hangs undiscerned. And in...

Page 243

...or the bed we sleep upon. This
with no touch of the motive-monger or the ascetic....

Page 244

...pool never dry--and the
thirst and the water are both blessed." It was in the Greeks
particularly...

Page 245

...acquisitions. "And yet I have lost something too," he said
regretfully. "Up to now Scott seemed...

Page 246

...He hated a
draped virtue, and despised a wit on its own defence. And he drew...

Page 247

...a bit of a schoolboy,
and must still throw stones; but the essential toleration that underlay
his...

Page 248

...dire, nous etions presque toujours en discussion; et il nous
arrivait de nous rire...

Page 249

...me disait
souvent: "Quel bon Francais vous faites!" Et il m'aimait a cause de
...

Page 250

...pas se bien continuer si vous ne me donnez pas la
permission de vous...

Page 251

...was reading Smiles. "I read my
engineers' lives steadily," he writes, "but find biographies depressing.
I suspect...

Page 252

...comes to all.
"Poor mother," I find Fleeming writing, "I cannot get the tones of her
voice...

Page 253

...hear for the first
time--the news had come to me by way of the Infirmary) and...

Page 254

...past, and not to weep. But to the Captain, I think
it was all happiness. After...

Page 255

...out of these facts, even as there shone through his own troubled
utterance, some of the...

Page 256

...wish to make a person die as
he ought to die in a novel," he said...

Page 257

...have Psalms read aloud to
him, if they were of a pious strain--checking, with an "I...

Page 258

...mystic and filial.
"The grave is not good, the approaches to it are terrible," he had
written...

Page 259

...for himself, not without ground, the fate which had
overtaken his mother; others shared the fear....