The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 15

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

Page 1

...ANDREW AINSLIE, \
...

Page 2

..."sacred" is strong enough?

MARY. You are satirical!

LESLIE. I? And with regard to the Deacon? Believe...

Page 3

...should like to have heard you! What did uncle say? Did he
speak of the Town...

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...at school.

LESLIE. I know it, Mr. Brodie. Was I not the last in the same...

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...'Faith, Brodie, I hardly know how to style it.

BRODIE. At any rate, 'tis not the...

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...gang wi' the water; and
that's aye a _solatium_, as we say. If I am to...

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...me there. With my attacks, you know, I must
always live a bit of a hermit's...

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... "Says Bacchus to...

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...at the Wyndheid; there's naething again' me.

HUNT. No, to be sure there ain't; and why...

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...farmers, by the Lard----"

BRODIE. By Gad!

SMITH. Good for trade, ain't it? And we thought, Deakin,...

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...be better, guess.

BRODIE. Not to-night, Mary; not to-night. I have other fish to fry, and
they...

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...flaming forth the man of
men he is!)--How still it is!... My father and Mary--Well! the...

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...thought we'd do the trick).

LAWSON. Ay, he'll be a fine man, Sir John. Hand me...

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...otherwise Jingling Geordie;
red-haired and curly, slight, flash; an old thimble-rig; has been a
stroller; suspected of...

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...I can't get
over, Mrs. Watt. I'm a family man myself; and I can't get over...

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...of my stamp don't risk--they plan, Badger;
they plan, and leave chance to such cattle as...

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...right and wrong. You dared me to do it. I was
drunk; I was upon my...

Page 18

...kind of
warms my heart. But it's not mine.

MOORE. Muck! why not?

BRODIE. 'Tis too big and...

Page 19

...Deakin, my beauty, where are you? Come to the
arms of George, and let him introduce...

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...counters; the bonnie money-catching,
money-breeding bones! Hark to their dry music! Scotland against
England! Sit round, you...

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...Take my arm, Deacon.

BRODIE. Down, dog, down! (Stay and be drunk with your equals.) Gentlemen
and...

Page 22

...this
house of mine, where I wish I could say you are welcome, stay.
(_Going._)

JEAN. It's the...

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...the way.

JEAN (_starting to door_). It's the Fiscal; I'm awa. (BRODIE, L.)


SCENE III

...

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...a care, Procurator. No wry words!

LAWSON. Do you say it to my face, sir? Dod,...

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...shame upon your heart!

BRODIE. Rogues all!

LAWSON. You're the son of my sister, William Brodie. Mair...

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...Can I come in, Will?

BRODIE. O yes, come in, come in! (_MARY enters._) I wanted...

Page 27

...I would say it. But I have
said all; every word is spoken; there's the end.

MARY....

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...... O Deacon, Deacon, God
forgive you! (_She goes out._)

BRODIE. Amen. But will He?


SCENE...

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...sportsman to another, Mr. Deacon, I was sorry to hear that you've
been dropping a hatful...

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...your errand?

MOORE. Business.

SMITH. After the melancholy games of last night, Deakin, which no one
deplores so...

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...I'm a
man, I am.

BRODIE. This is plain speaking.

MOORE. Plain? Wot about your father as can't...

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...They used to fetch and carry for me, and
now ... I've licked their boots, have...

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...yet; but, please God, I'll make your life a life of
gold; and wherever I am,...

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...he is, Jean; and for the matter of that he ain't the only one.

JEAN. Geordie,...

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...way o' expressin' yoursel'.

HUNT (_to JEAN_). I can't waste time on you, my girl. It's...

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...great
cordiality to meet AINSLIE, who enters L._) And so your name's Andrew
Ainslie, is it? As...

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...puir lad, and me sae weak, and fair rotten wi' the
drink an' that. Ye've a...

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...wi' me. I'm to get my orders frae Geordie the nicht.

HUNT. O, you're to get...

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...Leslie.

BRODIE. I give him fair warning: it's not safe.

LESLIE. I have a different treasure to...

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...an auld man, I'd be just beside mysel' wi'
happiness.

LESLIE. Well, I only fancied ...

LAWSON. Ye...

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...uneasy with my friends and on bad terms with my own
conscience. I keep watching, spying,...

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...masked, appears
without at the window, which he proceeds to force._) Ha! I knew he'd
come. I...

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...and admits LAWSON. Door open till end of Act._)


SCENE V

BRODIE, LAWSON,...

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...you might have spared the
old man this.

BRODIE. I might have spared him years ago; and...

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...all to get thundering
well scragged?

BRODIE (_going_). There is my master.


END OF THE THIRD...

Page 46

...I never see such a change in a man. I gave him the office for
to-night;...

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...In with you.

MOORE (_entering with light_). Mucking fine work too, Deacon!

BRODIE. Take up the irons,...

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...Mr. Jerry Hunt's compliments. Johnstone and Syme, you come along
with me. I'll bring the Deacon...

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...I cannot help you; I cannot help you if I would. He is not here;...

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...am his sister. I owe him a
lifetime of happiness and love; I owe him even...

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...He is my brother now. Let me take you to our father. Come.


SCENE...

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...I, your own
sister. And O Will, my Willie, where have you been? You have not...

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...sweet friend! Was I
ever unkind to you till yesterday? Not openly unkind? You'll say that
when...

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...is I. None else has sinned; none else must suffer. This poor
woman (_pointing to JEAN_)...

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...talk was fit,
For slang had not been canonised as wit;
When manners...

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...me, you were positively calling!) into the street.

BARBARA. Well, madam, just wait until you hear...

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...you, Miss Evelina, two for
me, and only one for Miss Dorothy. Miss Dorothy seems quite...

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...case with Mr. Austin.

MISS FOSTER. With Mr. Austin? why, how very rustic! The attentions of...

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...seeing life, which is exactly what he wanted.
You brought him up surprisingly well; I have...

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...wear the willow in anger.

DOROTHY. I do not think, madam, that I am of a...

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...to the
soul with trustfulness. Alas, and were it otherwise, were her dear eyes
opened to the...

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...boy. There is not a meadow on
Edenside but is dear to me for your sake,...

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...you
must never speak of love to me again.

FENWICK. What do you say? How dare you?

DOROTHY....

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...more than that, poor soul. I said my life was done, I was
wrong; I have...

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...and looks at
MENTEITH_)--tells us young men you were a devil of a fellow in your
time.

AUSTIN....

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...But would your aunt, my very good friend, approve?

ANTHONY. Why, sir, you do not suppose...

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...of Allonby Shaw since the days of
the Black Knight. We are, in fact, and at...

Page 68

...of a suspicion, you who are a man crowned and
acclaimed, who are loved, and loved...

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...that? Was not
this sacrifice enough, or must the world, once again, step between Mr.
Austin and...

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...your reproof is harsh----

FENWICK (_interrupting him_). O sir, be just, be just!----

AUSTIN. But it is...

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...you are in the right. This
shall be a good change for both you and me....

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...I am afraid that even at your age George Austin held a very
different position from...

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...What I want is to make
Aunt Evelina understand that I'm not the man to be...

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...take and
break it. Why that? It frightens me, Mr. Anthony, it frightens me.

ANTHONY (_with necklace_)....

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...say it.

FENWICK. Good God, who told _you_?

ANTHONY. Ay, Jack; it's hard on me, Jack. But...

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...more explicit.

AUSTIN. The right, my dear sir, is beyond question; but it is one, as
you...

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...you left me to my fate; and you come here
to-day--prompted, I doubt not, by an...

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...position who would have done as I have
done: sate at the feet of a young...

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...the more your victim: that is all, and shall that
change my heart? The sin must...

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...know, dear, I know; but there was nothing to come about.

ANTHONY. It's a lie. You...

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...Anthony!... O my God, George will kill him.


(MUSIC: "Che faro" as the drop...

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...O dear! was it for that?

MENTEITH. Though, to be sure, madam, Mr. George would always...

Page 83

...it told of you.

AUSTIN. Madam, there are some ladies over whom it is a boast...

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...so much of you; I
will go further: were the positions changed, I should fear to...

Page 85

...My dear creature, remember that we are in
public. (_Raising her._) Your Royal Highness, may I...

Page 86

...takes down the telescope to dust it._) Father's
spy-glass again; and my poor Kit perhaps with...

Page 87

...say yourself: Here is a man that has
loved; here is a man that will be...

Page 88

...to set me up and buy a tidy sloop--Jack Lee's; you know the boat,
Captain; clinker...

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...very salvation that you had yourself?

GAUNT. Salvation, Christopher French, is from above.

KIT. Well, sir, that...

Page 90

...through for it. Say just this--"Prove I was
mistaken," and by George, I'll prove it.

GAUNT (_looking...

Page 91

...It sounds a wild kind of song.
(_Tap-tap; PEW passes the window._) O, what a face--and...

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...Or be they blue like to the sky."

Black like the Admiral's? or blue like his...

Page 93

...loses your 'ed, Pew, with a female: that's
what charms 'em.--Now for business. The front door....

Page 94

...more--and blind at that. Don't you
remember the old chantie?--

...

Page 95

...Lagos down to Calabar; and when at last I sent you
ashore, a marooned man--your shipmates,...

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...small table laid with a cloth.
Tables, L., with glasses, pipes, etc. Broadside ballads...

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...truth; and I'll
thank you to take yourself off.

PEW. Thirty years have I fought for country...

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...(_changing piece_). I'm sure I didn't know it, sailor.

PEW (_trying new coin between his teeth_)....

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...lovely
woman--by the feel of her 'and and arm!--you might have knocked me down
with a feather....

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...in it still.

MRS. DRAKE. No, sailor, nothing out of me! And if you want to...

Page 101

...of the settle_). Spoke like a gallant
seaman, every inch. Shipmate, I'm a man as has...

Page 102

...just couldn't and just won't I, then!

MRS. DRAKE. I hope, madam, you don't refer to...

Page 103

...and by your leave I'll have it
out.

ARETHUSA. Kit, for pity's sake!

KIT. Arethusa, I don't speak...

Page 104

...to up and force a act of
parleyment upon a helpless female. But you see here:...

Page 105

...David Pew; I never heard of
you; I don't seem able to clearly see you. Mrs....

Page 106

...I ax your pardon; but as a man with a 'ed for argyment--and that's
your best...

Page 107

...put it to
you, as between man and man.

KIT. Pew, I may have gifts; but I...

Page 108

...I'll go through fire and water.

PEW. I'll risk it. Well, then, see here, my son:...

Page 109

...thou goest, I will go; and
where thou lodgest, I will lodge: thy people shall be...

Page 110

...on earth; and it
was I that killed her.

ARETHUSA. Killed her? my mother? You?

GAUNT. Not with...

Page 111

...Lord!

ARETHUSA. O!

GAUNT. It was two hundred and five that we threw overboard: two hundred
and five...

Page 112

...and this poor contrivance numbered
them. The ring--with that I married her. This chain, it's of...

Page 113

...guidance in prayer.
Good-night, my little maid.

ARETHUSA. O father, I know you at last.


SCENE...

Page 114

...when done.

KIT. So you brought me here to steal, did you?

PEW. Ay did I; and...

Page 115

...examines chest._) Ah!

PEW. Leastways, I was to 'elp him, by his account of it, while...

Page 116

...tack before you, I reckon: you ask the
Chaplain of the Fleet else, as called me...

Page 117

...throat like a weasel,
and had me rolling on the floor. He was quick, and I,...

Page 118

...believe in him; you do; I know you do.

GAUNT. Child, I am not given to...

Page 119

...dark,
and couldn't see my hand. It made me pity that blind man, by George.

ARETHUSA. O,...

Page 120

...my sake, it was for my sake!

GAUNT. Ten days out from Lagos. That's a strange...

Page 121

...knife._) Ah, here she is; and now for the chest; and the
gold; and rum--rum--rum. What!...

Page 122

...gives to him._) Rum? This ain't
rum; it's fire! (_With great excitement._) What's this? I don't...

Page 123

... SCENE I

_ALINE and MAIDS; to whom, FIDDLERS; afterwards DUMONT and CHARLES. As
...

Page 124

...expose yourself to
misconstruction. (_To CHARLES._) Where is your commanding officer?

CHARLES. Why, sir, we have quite...

Page 125

...cookery; truffles, before Jove! I was born for truffles. Cock your
hat: meat, wine, rest, and...

Page 126

...or look for
mischief. It's not _bon ton_, I know, and far from friendly. But what...

Page 127

...you behind it,
Bertrand, in a tasteful livery.

BERTRAND (_seeing CHARLES_). Lord, a policeman!

MACAIRE. Steady! What is...

Page 128

...from the barrel._) O, I must have all happy around me.

GORIOT. Then help the soup.

DUMONT....

Page 129

...my daater. (_General consternation._)

DUMONT. O Goriot, let's have happy faces!

GORIOT. Happy faces be danged! I...

Page 130

...the young man, full, I am sure, of pleasing qualities;
here the young maiden, by her...

Page 131

... |
...

Page 132

... ...

Page 133

...of this?

BERTRAND. That? Is it a key?

MACAIRE. Ay, boy, and what besides? my diploma of...

Page 134

...churchwarden: each with bottle and
glass_


SCENE I

MACAIRE, BERTRAND

MACAIRE. Bertrand, I...

Page 135

...|
GORIOT. I told 'ee he can't, and 'ee can't. |
...

Page 136

...regarded Mr. Dumont----

MACAIRE. Love him still, dear boy, love him still. I have not returned
to...

Page 137

...the letter.

MARQUIS. Well, so did I.

CURATE. The judgment of Solomon.

GORIOT. What did I tell 'ee?...

Page 138

...each claims yon interesting lad, and there again we are on
a par. But, my lord--and...

Page 139

...have: ten thousand francs.

MARCAIRE. It's a poor thing, but it must do. Dumont, I bury...

Page 140

...to table R. He feels in all his pockets: BERTRAND
from behind him making signs to...

Page 141

...then there's your key!
What is your key? Where is your key? Where isn't it? And...

Page 142

...man is doomed.


DROP




ACT III


_As the curtain rises, the Stage...

Page 143

...I'd rather perish, than either: I'm not fit, I'm
not fit for either! Why, how's this?...

Page 144

...it's my cash-box!

MACIARE. Why, so it is!

DUMONT. It's very singular.

MACAIRE. Diabolishly singular.

BERTRAND. Early worms, early...

Page 145

...Dumont, that bottle.

MACAIRE. Sir, my friend and I, who are students of character, would
grasp the...

Page 146

...law; and as a citizen
it is one's pride to do him honour.

BRIGADIER. Those are my...

Page 147

...is not dead. He is not even dangerously hurt. He
has spoken. There is the would-be...