The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 21

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

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... ...

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... 195


THE GREAT...

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... ...

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... 290

XV. THE...

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...to make her more than human, whilst yet by a cunning art
he has so based...

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...a friend and a courier, which made him worse than
embarrassing to repay. But those whom...

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...a pleasure. Life is my business--life--this great
city, Paris--Paris after dark--its lights, its gardens, its odd...

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...they were no stranger than might have been
expected, and he may find things quite as...

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...The universe seemed plain to him. "The thing's right," he would
say, or "the thing's wrong";...

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...that
he was the only one who ever apologised. This gave him a high station in
his...

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... here
He maunna think to domineer.

Liberalism," continued the anonymous...

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...As Richard came in, he opened and shut his mouth like a
cod-fish, and his eyes...

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...as if his life had come abruptly to an
end. He came out of his theories...

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...took it in at once
like breathing air.

"I beg your pardon," he said, taking off his...

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...was six years old; and yet he is in my thoughts
all day! You must come...

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...sight of her surprised him.
Her strong black brows spoke of temper easily aroused and hard...

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...had found the Admiral painting in a cafe;
how his art so possessed him that he...

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...keep alive in
the heart of a daughter that filial trust and honour which, even
although misplaced,...

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...would tell
him all."

"What!" cried Dick, "go in months after, and brag that I meant to...

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...where he will not observe me?"

"Why?" asked Dick.

"It is a fancy; you forget, I am...

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...alone, or had some new protector made his appearance
from among the millions of Europe? It...

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...my valise past the
concierge--a work of considerable tact--and here I am!"

"Yes," said Dick, "and here...

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...my declension. These are our little _amours propres_, my
daughter: your father must respect himself. Thank...

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...that he beheld; he even asked the name of a
plant, and rallied himself gently for...

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...both natural
and praiseworthy. But now that they were alone, she became conscious of
a barrier between...

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...throwing the slightest gleam of
light upon the affair. Often and often has he remarked to...

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...some daughters; I
will not be jealous of your art, and I will try to understand...

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..._A
propos_, you have never asked me how I liked my daughter?"

"No," said Dick roundly; "I...

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...whether
or not the old toper would return there by himself. Had he done so, of
course...

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...catch the growth of the
carbuncle. We are warned against bad judgments; but the Admiral was
certainly...

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...had the slightest hesitation in sponging upon any human
creature."

Thereupon Dick got up.

"I think, perhaps," he...

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...like the pit. Dick remained as she
had left him, standing squarely on one foot and...

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...of paper, and she leaped
to her feet with an ejaculation, looked about her once, blew...

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...all she answered.

Wild words uttered, as these were, with perfect quiet of manner,
exercise a double...

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...consider; and I still urge you to think better of your
fancies. But if your mind...

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...to break, for an instant, the spell that lay
upon her; for, instead of hastening forward...

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...set off suddenly walking in one direction after another
with brisk, decisive footsteps. Moreover, he had...

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..._do_ you?"

"I don't know," she replied. "Why do you ask me? Oh, how should I...

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...you, until that man
came home and I began to find myself deceived. Give me back...

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...cheeks flushed during
these last words, relapsed in a second into a state of petrifaction. She
remained...

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...garden
with a slow and mechanical gait; and Dick, following close behind her,
heard from within the...

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...from this gang; God
help him with the next! He has a taste for low company,...

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...enter into the spirit of the interview.

"Then why do you call yourself one, sir?"

"I have...

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...said he; "I
believe you forget that the appellation is common to both of us. I...

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...the world, Dick; and she can have no claim
on you--no claim, I tell you; and...

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...have lost all."

He relinquished her hand, still looking at her, and she turned to leave
the...

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...I was
fit for any drawing-room. I should like you to tell me how many fathers,
lay...

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...Squire. He was right, he was a broken man.

Then the Editor described Dick's warning visit;...

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...from
his heart. I have heard much of you since then; for you have a fervent
advocate...

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...when I set forth on foot for
the last time for Aros. A boat had put...

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...say the words signify in the
Gaelic tongue; and it is well named. For that hill-top,...

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...full, this was clear and still, like a pool on a land
river; only there was...

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...a little dancing mutter of sound as though the _Roost_
were talking to itself. But when...

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...out of
Ireland to convert the Hebrideans. And, indeed, I think he had some
claim to be...

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...name, and how she carried a great
part of the Spaniards' treasure, and had been lost...

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...took him a long while to pull across the bay; and I
observed him several times...

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...the wide chimney the sun
shone into, and the clear-smouldering peats; with the pipes on the
mantelshelf...

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...fits when
he was afraid of hell; but he had led a rough life, to which...

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...have had a prood, prood heart that won ashore
upon the back o' that."

"And were all...

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...ca' them? Judgments, rather:
judgments in the mirk nicht among the draygons o' the deep. And...

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...Lang syne, when I was a callant in the south country,
I mind there was an...

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...I thocht we were over
near Soa; but na, it wasna that, it was puir Sandy...

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...run of tide
at the south-west end of Aros exercises a perturbing influence round all
the coast....

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...clavers to Mary," he observed, and began
to walk forward.

There is a belt of turf along...

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...was small encouragement, but I was not to be put off.
"All my days I have...

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...than information for a learned society. I made up
my mind, I should lose no time...

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...well sheltered from
all but the prevailing wind; sandy and shoal and bounded by low
sand-hills to...

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...guarding his sepulchre, and
lingering on the scene of his unhappy fate.

Certainly it was with a...

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...of the current
and the soundings both pointed to the east side of the bay under...

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...my
dreams of wealth.

I stripped to the skin, and stood on the extreme margin with my...

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...so much along the swerving
decks--the whole human fact of him, as a creature like myself,...

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...with the change of the tide, and Sandag Bay was no longer a
safe place for...

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...a breeze that was still insensible on Aros; and already
along the curve of Sandag Bay...

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...the bone and the shoe-buckle going from
hand to hand, causing the most unusual gesticulations of...

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...was still pulling seaward, but I now became aware of
what had been hidden from me...

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...after my impatient
strides. The spring seemed to have gone out of his body, and he
scrambled...

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...protested, "ye maunna interfere; ye maunna meddle wi' the
like o' that. It's His"--doffing his bonnet--"His...

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...not laugh at me just now. God knows I
am in no heart for laughing. If...

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...had
settled round the house.

"God pity all poor folks at sea!" she said. "We'll see no...

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...away with the poor fellows on the
schooner, or my not less unhappy uncle, houseless on...

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...that hour, there flashed into my mind the reason of the
name that they were called....

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...was standing up behind the parapet, his head thrown
back and the bottle to his mouth....

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...refuse, but Rorie touched me as if in warning; and indeed
I had already thought better...

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...we crawled back into the shelter of the
bank. As I lay against the parapet, wholly...

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...he
could not have shrunk more panically from its touch; and once, when his
foot slipped and...

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...to each other, as they gathered together to the
assault of Aros; and close before us,...

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...last words; but there came no answer, and his
face expressed no feeling but a vague...

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...dropped immediately to the sands, and began slowly
to approach, with many stops and hesitations. At...

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...voice, but not a word
was comprehensible. I tried him first in English, then in Gaelic,...

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...the rest to come aboard; now as an
officer, running along the rock and entering the...

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...But when I began a second time to advance, his
insane fears blazed up again, and...

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...have done the
fair thing; he has been fed and warmed under this roof; now I...

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...dead, and thus one point of the compass at
least would be secure.

When at length I...

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...was gone from his perch. The basket had indeed been torn open
and the meat scattered...

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...avoided the grave, and skimmed
close past the timbers of the wreck; in a breath they...

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...grew
dark, as I had maliciously foreseen it would. It was out of the
question, he said....

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...girl, who stands very high with her confessor, and is,
therefore," chuckled the physician, "most likely...

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...had advanced some miles, and the city
had already shrunk into an inconsiderable knoll upon the...

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...naked chasm of a torrent. The waters thundered
tumultuously in the bottom; and the ravine was...

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...just singing!" Above all, I
was taken with a trick he had of unweariedly repeating the...

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...wine, I poured out a cup and called to
him to come and drink of it....

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...some scruple of
the delicate flesh that was once clothed upon with the satin and brocade
of...

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...of the lady in the
frame. But these humours were swift to pass; and the resemblance...

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...and listen, and seem to
drink in the world like a cordial; and then he would...

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...a pleasure in pain. I only tighten
my hold, and see how you suffer." He screamed...

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...windows and the closed doors of numerous cellars, and the
vacant arches of the gallery, enclosed...

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...at once baffled and embarrassed. Yet
when I came there and saw the face of the...

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...my habit to sit down beside her four times in the
day, both coming and going,...

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...as he came near, and the pupils of her vacant eyes would
contract as if with...

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...ashamed of my own discomposure.

All day the wind continued; and I sat in my room...

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...could only echo his question, for
I was disturbed enough myself.

I went to bed early, wearied...

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...cries
(which I never did without a shuddering chill) it seemed altogether
insufficient: not even cruelty could...

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...much these evidences of greatness
that took hold upon my mind, even contrasted, as they were,...

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...approached with pain and shame,
Grief with a wreath of lilies came.
Pleasure...

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...that that was as it should be, and looked at me a
little askance. Lastly, I...

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...he smiled
with a brightness of pleasure that came near disarming my resolve. But I
trod the...

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...energies of life, whom He had made active
as a deer, slender as a reed, and...

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...Olalla all
that I desired and had not dared to imagine was united.

I did not see...

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...more than usual with the Senora. God knows it was
with a most tender and sincere...

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...the complete human intimacy. I thought of it
with wild hopes, like a voyager to El...

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...at the
coming of pity, all other thoughts were swallowed up; and I longed only
to find...

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...bonds of my speech; I felt as lightened of a
weight, or as if a spell...

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...hammer on the anvil, and the hills shook;
the earth, under that vigorous insolation, yielded up...

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...opened
in my life unmanned me like a physical void. It was not my heart, it...

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...trance-like weakness fell upon me; I saw, heard, and felt, but I was
incapable of movement....

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...darken and brighten, and still speak no language but that of an
unfathomable kindness; I saw...

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...resist, but
winced a little; and I could see her look upon me with a frown...

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...your ears.
The hands of the dead are in my bosom; they move me, they pluck...

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...yourself how the wheel has gone backward with my doomed race. I
stand, as it were,...

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...Felipe walked in silence
beside the shafts, but from time to time he would check the...

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...in
God's hands, and that His ways are not our ways? I have even advised
with my...

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...and I made sure that the more
superstitious crossed themselves on my approach. At first I...

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...my comrades sold himself
to Satan; the Virgin shield us from temptations! He has paid the...

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...left to the more awful judgment of an offended God.
This was wrong; but it should...

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...all such as He was--the inheritors of sin;
we must all bear and expiate a past...

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...his slumber seems to body
forth the story of that Celtic race, deprived for so many...

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...hands of Mr. Kidd; there was that much the more to pay for! She
could neither...

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...dirty, miry glebes, or of his soul? Presently he was heard to weep,
and my lady's...

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..."or _Hell_ Haddo, as he was more justly to be
called, a pokeful of old condemned...

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...first of them.
Crossing the braes, he hears the clatter of a horse's shoes, and claps
down...

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...might have been minded of a nymph and satyr, if
anybody could have taken long-leggit Janet...

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...the scene between Curate
Haddo and Janet M'Clour had also given him much to think of:...

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...still more when she was angry, there
hung about her face the terrifying semblance of a...

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...he heard too much: his father and
himself being "compliers"--that is to say, attending the church...

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...and swordsman: and it was his pleasure to walk
with his son over the braes of...

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...went through the door, with something very fond and
secret, like a caress between a pair...

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...us reason
together! I drop all points of controversy, weighty though these be; I
take your defaced...

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...she's been ower far wi' the dragoons," said Haddo. "I
never denied that. I ken naething...

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...devils of yore. When they pitched
a tent (which was often in wet weather, upon a...

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...was called "a holy groan."

A squall came up; a great volley of flying mist went...

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...to be a safe
meeting-place; and the out-pickets on this particular day had been
somewhat lax from...

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...of Crozer's build and hateful readiness of fist. Duty, as he
conceived it, pointed him forward...

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...faltered.

"So did I," quoth Jonathan; "but it appears I was mistook."

The very excess of her...

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...completely, she became
aware of an unusual brightness and bustle. A post-chaise stood in the
yard, its...

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...my lord, I am Holdaway's niece," replied Nance, with a
curtsey.

"Should have been here himself," observed...

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...at one bound, her dreams
returned to her. "My good Miss Holdaway," said he, "if you...

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...lay
all deserted, and only lit by a lantern set upon a window-sill. Through
this Nance rapidly...

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...the hills" was his air.
It rose to the two watchers on the moor with the...

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...never blurted out
so bold a piece of praise. 'Tis the best proof of my sincerity....

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...seen to issue, lantern in hand, from the tower door,
and, where the ruins did not...

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...the arch hung guns, axes, lanterns, and great sheaves
of rusty keys.

Jonathan looked about him, holding...

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...with the bright hues of life, and a woman. He looked upon her,
softening; and then...

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...with a very
excellent appetite, in silence. When she had done, she, too, drew a
tankard of...

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...words of mine, I'm
getting tired of it."

"I wouldn't say such words, at least," said Nance.

"You...

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...of it; I'll take a drop myself, it smells so sweet. And, Uncle
Jonathan, you let...

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...to beauty.

She thought of the golden zones in which gentlemen were bred, and
figured with so...

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...look down. Show me your cousin's path."

"He would go sure-foot along that little ledge," said...

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...the other three the funerals of folk you
loved, and all that, to have a quiet...

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...Lordship started in the chaise; and how he had dropped a rouleau of
gold on the...

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...long ago. But if you'll
give me another mug of your good ale, my pretty lady,...

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...his destiny, character, and hopes. To Nance these
interviews were but a doubtful privilege. At times...

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...across the
moor. At this she cheerfully laboured, and from that height she could
afford to pity...

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...credit to Old England. Such were the old man's declared
sentiments, and sure enough he clung...

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...be rheumaticky," said
he. "When I was young I stood my turn of the teethache like...

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...porridge, "you say
old age is a hard season, but so is youth. You're half out...

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...now wondering to himself on the
injustice and partiality of the law, now computing again and...

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...and
the air of the afternoon would be suddenly sweet with the fragrance of
new grass.

Above and...

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..."I
would say there was a third choice, and that the right one."

"I tell you," said...

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...cried, "ay, and should be a great one! The more
shame to you to lie here...

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...other channel but yon stagnant
water in the midst shall be for lying still. You see...

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...trust, my blue-eyed Minerva. Both
have said the same. My own heart was telling it already....

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..."not been the like of it this fifteen
years: the North Mail stopped at the three...

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...Clayton, and
gets the old man by the other arm. 'We've been robbed,' he cries,
'robbed!' Down...

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...neither?"

"Surely not," said Mr. Archer.

Oglethorpe lay in a low bed, one of several in a...

Page 185

...said
Archer.

"Why, no, sir, more against Engleton and the passengers," replied the
guard. "He played his hand,...

Page 186

...like
an atmosphere; one that came by chance into the wine-shop was aware of
that passion; and...

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...travellers' cloaks that had seen
service, set the greater mark of richness on what showed below...

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...of starting up,
his eyes fixed on vacancy. Any one else must have looked foolish; but
not...

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...But come! Because
you are chaste, for which I am sure I pay you my respects,...

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...replied the
new-comer, "_le nom n'y fait rien et l'on connait vos beaux faits._"
[The name matters...

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...him for
revenge. He glanced about the shop. He saw the two indifferent gentlemen
deep in talk,...

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...the half-man were stirred to frenzy; the lust of
destruction raged in him; there was not...

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...where they had been recently and
rudely nailed, a few miniatures and a copper medal of...

Page 194

...lit that also; and the fir-cones and
the gnarled olive billets were swift to break in...

Page 195

...beyond, the sudden sound of a raised voice attracted him.

"By....




FABLES




FABLES




I

THE PERSONS OF THE TALE


After the...

Page 196

...know the Author respects me; I feel it in
my bones: when you and I had...

Page 197

...do my duty; and if you try
to do yours, I can't compliment you on your...

Page 198

...his head.

"I am much more engaged in considering the position of the ship," said
Mr. Spoker.

"Spoken...

Page 199

...a long way,
and he was tired and hungry, and dismounted from his horse to smoke...

Page 200

..."but I cannot bear your being such a
fool." And with that he heaved up his...

Page 201

...youth, taking a walk in the public street, with not
one fleck of paint upon his...

Page 202

...be the use of it?"

"Why," said the physician, "I perceive I must explain to you...

Page 203

...thunderbolt."

"Are there no thunderbolts for these strangers?" asked Jack.

"Jupiter is long-suffering to the benighted," returned...

Page 204

...that country in the Wood of Eld. He was one like
Glaucus that could change his...

Page 205

...room after another,
all bare, but all furnished in part, so that a man could dwell...

Page 206

...get home I
shall find my uncle dancing."

So he went on after the bloodless thing. In...

Page 207

...soul, and the day was like night to him. "This has
been a sore business," said...

Page 208

...the Peace. It began to look black for the friend, but the man
for a while...

Page 209

...show him everything.

First of all they came through a wood, and the stranger looked upon...

Page 210

...not think he can be much account," said the gelding.

"Depend upon it he is only...

Page 211

...closed upon him, and the waters, and the
meshes of the net; and he wallowed there...

Page 212

...you were
alive!"

"To other people's," said the missionary. "Never to my own."

"But yours have all proved...

Page 213

...the mind of
Odin."

"These are but playings upon words," returned the priest. "A sackful of
such trash...

Page 214

...a boy after his heart, but the elder was
one whom he feared. It befell one...

Page 215

...was silent, so that the lads were filled
with reverence; and the maid served them smiling...

Page 216

...and search the world for the stone of touch." So he said farewell,
and rode into...

Page 217

...indeed,
beautiful in hue, adorned with polishing, the light inhabiting its
sides; and when he found this,...

Page 218

...elder son looked upon it
scornfully and shook his head; and he went away, for it...

Page 219

...that are a
restless man and a runagate, to doubt my justice, or the King my
father's,...

Page 220

...of the afternoon. The fire burned in the midst, and the smoke
went up and the...

Page 221

...out."

So they came to the little isle of sheep, where the surf burst all about
it...

Page 222

...thing of no price," quoth the man, "for it is rusty."

"We shall see that," said...

Page 223

...hanged upon the gallows; and that was near at hand, so that the
man could see...

Page 224

...my thought," quoth the man, "one thing is as good----"

"O, spare me that," said the...

Page 225

...the
blowing of the wind.

"Now," said the King's daughter, and she named a holy name, "this...

Page 226

...dusk in the autumn, and there
came a sound in the wind like a sound of...

Page 227

...piped the song of the morrow, and it was as long as years; and the
nurse...

Page 228

...blew about her face in the blowing of the
wind. And when she lifted up her...