The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 14

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

Page 1

... 4
...

Page 2

... ...

Page 3

...brown is the river

XV. AUNTIE'S SKIRTS ...

Page 4

... 14
...

Page 5

... ...

Page 6

... ...

Page 7

... ...

Page 8

... ...

Page 9

... VI. BLOCK CITY ...

Page 10

... Birds all the sunny...

Page 11

... 50
...

Page 12

...TO ANY READER ...

Page 13

... 71
...

Page 14

... ...

Page 15

... ...

Page 16

... ...

Page 17

... Peace and her huge invasion to...

Page 18

... ...

Page 19

...the years to be

II. ILLE TERRARUM ...

Page 20

... It's rainin'. Weet's the...

Page 21

... ...

Page 22

...169

II. THE LOVERS ...

Page 23

...OF RAHERO ...

Page 24

... ...

Page 25

... ...

Page 26

... ...

Page 27

... ...

Page 28

... ...

Page 29

... 239
...

Page 30

... ...

Page 31

...night

XLII. ...

Page 32

... 3. Since I...

Page 33

... ...

Page 34

...story-books you read:
For all the pains you comforted:
For all you pitied,...

Page 35

...faster on they go,
And still beside them close I keep
Until we...

Page 36

...A man goes riding by.
Late in the night when the fires are out,
...

Page 37

...the seas.

The children sing in far Japan,
The children sing...

Page 38

...about.

I was the giant great and still
That sits upon the pillow-hill,
...

Page 39

...toys and things to eat,
He is a naughty child, I'm sure--
Or...

Page 40

... Waves upon the stick!

Here's enough of fame and pillage,
...

Page 41

...Marvellous places, though handy to home!

Sounds of the village grow stiller and stiller,
...

Page 42

...things to eat,
I am fed on proper meat;
You must dwell beyond...

Page 43

...Perhaps a toy or two.

All night across the dark we steer:
...

Page 44

...and very cool;

Till a wind or water wrinkle,
Dipping marten,...

Page 45

...out, my nurse doth wrap
Me in my comforter and cap,
The cold...

Page 46

...party round the fire!
The songs you sing, the tales you tell,
Till...

Page 47

...never can win.

'Tis he, when at night you go off to your bed,
...

Page 48

... Out from the house at even-fall,
To call me home to...

Page 49

...be mountains, the carpet be sea,
There I'll establish a city for me:
...

Page 50

...falling feet;
And the blue even slowly falls
About the garden trees and...

Page 51

...thoughtful creatures sit
On the grassy coasts of it;
Little things with lovely...

Page 52

...Here I see it glow with day
Under glowing heaven.

Every...

Page 53

...Though closer still the blinds we pull
To keep the shady parlour cool,
...

Page 54

...all the summer flowers,
The red fire blazes,
The grey smoke...

Page 55

...of Tartary.

A thousand miles we galloped fast,
And down the witches' lane...

Page 56

... It wears an altered face
And shields a stranger race.
The river,...

Page 57

...people thought of you in places far away.

Ay, and while you slept, a...

Page 58

...has, such as is possible to those who practise an
art, never to those who drive...

Page 59

...The gauger walked with willing foot,
And aye the gauger played the flute;
...

Page 60

...quiver, robe and shift
And the rough country stockings lie
Around each young...

Page 61

...rising from the broomy lea,
And every fairy wheel and thread
Of cobweb,...

Page 62

...more and more,
At sundown to the garden door.
And I, being provided...

Page 63

...shore hear inland voices call.
Strange is the seaman's heart; he hopes, he fears;
...

Page 64

...whole sky
Even in a wink had over-brimmed in rain.
Hark, in these...

Page 65

...When He with inkpot and with rod
Endowed you, bade your fortune lead
...

Page 66

...And, dancing, roll his eyes; these, where they fell,
Shed glee, and through the...

Page 67

...Or willowy islet, win upon thy soul
And to thy hopeful shallop whisper speed;
...

Page 68

...Slighted _De Mauves_, and that far different she,
_Gressie_, the trivial sphynx; and to...

Page 69

...and true,
Your flowers and thorns you bring with you!


XXI

REQUIEM

Under the wide...

Page 70

...my love, ye, O my friends--
The gist of life, the end of ends--
...

Page 71

...voices; but not yet
Depart, my soul, not yet a while depart.

Freedom...

Page 72

... Each for some separate end is born
In season fit, and still
...

Page 73

...never dim December
Breathed its killing chills upon the head or heart.

...

Page 74

...THE STATES

With half a heart I wander here
As from...

Page 75

... And love we found, and peace,
...

Page 76

...as a child of savages
When evening takes her on her way
(She...

Page 77

...the Scots
tongue has an orthography of its own, lacking neither "authority nor
author." Yet the temptation...

Page 78

...childhood; and it is in
the drawling Lothian voice that I repeat it to myself. Let...

Page 79

...An' what was richt and wrang for me
...

Page 80

...like a railway car
An' flie...

Page 81

...lane,
Wi' Horace, or perhaps Montaigne,
The mornin' hours hae come an' gane
...

Page 82

... Toun-bred or land'art,
An' follow in a denty band
...

Page 83

...tale o' cheer.

An' noo, to that melodious play,
A' deidly awn the...

Page 84

... The stour in air.

But hark! the bells frae nearer clang;
To...

Page 85

... Wi' queer contortions.

Follows the prayer, the readin'...

Page 86

...that particular parish; but when I was a boy, he might have
been observed in many...

Page 87

... Upsets their plans;
He hates a' mankind, brainch and root,
...

Page 88

...briery muirs expand,
A waefue' an' a weary land,
The bumble-bees, a gowden...

Page 89

...bairns a' fa' to play'n',
As gleg's a...

Page 90

...sae guid, but what's the neist?
Yearly we gather to the feast,
...

Page 91

... Hae! there's your sonnet!


XI

EMBRO HIE KIRK

The Lord Himsel'...

Page 92

... Ding to destruction.

Up, Niven, or ower late--an' dash
...

Page 93

...Alicante,
In mony a fash and sair affliction
I gie't as my sincere...

Page 94

...Unfit for ony congregation.
Syne, while I still was on the tenter,
I...

Page 95

...warl' in sunshine span
As bricht's a preen.

...

Page 96

...that sair an' happy day!
Again the warl', grawn auld an' grey,
...

Page 97

... Wi' a' my speerit;
...

Page 98

... Were blithe to see ye.

O sir, the gods are kind indeed,
...

Page 99

...SONG OF RAHERO


I

THE SLAYING OF TAMATEA

It fell in the days of old, as...

Page 100

...had a name in the land for men to remember and love;
And never...

Page 101

...sounds on earth, dearest sound to me.
I have heard the applause of men,...

Page 102

... And behold how fitting the time! for here do I cover my fire."
...

Page 103

...of the fat of the fish,
The cut of kings and chieftains, enough for...

Page 104

... Tittering fell upon all at sight of the impudent thing,
At the sight...

Page 105

...kindly fool was dead.

But the mother of Tamatea arose with death in her...

Page 106

...mighty of hand?
And change in a breath again and rise in a strain...

Page 107

...pigs come nosing the food:
But meanwhile build us a house of Trotea, the...

Page 108

...to the Namunu-ura even as a friend to a friend."

So judged, and a...

Page 109

...the babes that ran already and played,
The clean-lipped smile of the boy, the...

Page 110

...the eighth wrought with his lads, hid from the sight of man.
In the...

Page 111

...the north;
But the wind was stubborn to die and blew as it blows...

Page 112

...lust that famished my soul now eats and drinks its desire,
And they that...

Page 113

...the life of their
mind,
And they lay like...

Page 114

... Sound-limbed he was: dry-eyed; but smarted in every part;
And the mighty cage...

Page 115

...a weapon, and covered with scorch and bruise,
He straightened his arms, he filled...

Page 116

...was black as the pit.
Rahero set him to row, never a word he...

Page 117

...birds were beginning to sing: the ghostly ruck
Of the buried had long ago...

Page 118

...that met the priest now glanced at him askance.
The priest was a man...

Page 119

...man;
And the village panted to see him in the jewels of death again,
...

Page 120

...dove?
Sly and shy as a cat, with never a change of face,
...

Page 121

...a clasp of the hands, a star that falls from above!
Ever at morn...

Page 122

...quick to smite.
Lie secret there, my Rua, in the arms of awful gods,
...

Page 123

...were summoned, and drummers; messengers came and went;
Braves ran to their lodges; weapons...

Page 124

...Once and again and again descended the murderous blow.
Now smoked the oven, and...

Page 125

...give to a child of the sun and the sea?"
And Rua arose and...

Page 126

...dark to his arms;
Taheia leaped to his clasp, and was folded in from...

Page 127

...Are they spirits abroad by day?
Or the foes of my clan that are...

Page 128

...spears."
And Rua straightened his back. "O Vais, a scheme for a scheme!"
...

Page 129

...with robes unruffled and garlands duly arranged,
Gazing far from the feast with faces...

Page 130

...In the days of the feud and the fight.
By the sides of the...

Page 131

...danger,
I have slain a man to my death.
I put...

Page 132

...nor duty,
It's neither quick nor dead,
Shall gar me withdraw...

Page 133

...in the mountains,
The smallest reef in the sea:
Names for...

Page 134

...neighing of the war-pipes
Struck terror in Cathay.[3]

"Many a name...

Page 135

... Lay filled with the painted men.

"Far have I been, and...

Page 136

...hunted them like roes.
Over miles of the red mountain
He...

Page 137

...son I fear.

"For life is a little matter,
And death...

Page 138

...his glass against his eye.

The frost was on the village roofs as white...

Page 139

...of Tahiti, where he
lived. I have heard from end to end two versions; and as...

Page 140

...155).

Note 8, page 146. "_Omare_," pronounce as a dactyl. A loaded
quarterstaff, one of the two...

Page 141

...the rain!

Notes 15 and 16, page 165. "_The star of the dead._" Venus as a...

Page 142

...passing overhead unfelt.

Note 8, page 178. "_The first of the victims fell._" Without doubt, this
whole...

Page 143

...the West Highlands."




SONGS OF TRAVEL

AND OTHER VERSES


SONGS OF TRAVEL


I

THE VAGABOND

(TO AN AIR OF SCHUBERT)

...

Page 144

...a highwayside.
Passing for ever, he fares; and on either hand,
Deep in...

Page 145

...star had come down to me.


VII

Plain as the glistering planets shine
...

Page 146

... In the day's dusk end
...

Page 147

... Bright were your eyes in the night:
...

Page 148

...singer lies
In the field of heather,
Songs of his fashion...

Page 149

...calling up the moor-fowl,
Spring shall bring the sun and rain, bring...

Page 150

...reveille summons all the brake:
_Chirp_, _chirp_, it goes; nor waits an answer long;
...

Page 151

... The morning drum-call on my eager ear
Thrills unforgotten yet; the morning dew
...

Page 152

...an adept,
The iniquitous lists I still accept
With joy, and joy to...

Page 153

...picture as it came.


XXVIII

TO AN ISLAND PRINCESS

Since long ago, a child at home,
...

Page 154

...rest from winds and tides,
Below your palace in your harbour rides:
And...

Page 155

...bright beyond compare,
I knew a queen of toil with a crown of silver...

Page 156

...hour....

SCHOONER _Equator_.


XXXIV

TO MY OLD FAMILIARS

Do you remember--can we e'er...

Page 157

...There, on the sunny frontage of a hill,
Hard by the house of kings,...

Page 158

...portico you pass,
One moment glance, where by the pillared wall
Far-voyaging island...

Page 159

...brows,
The while, our bond to implement,
My muse relates and praises his...

Page 160

...isle, beside the beating main,
To cure the sickly and constrain,
With muttered...

Page 161

... Trees mounted, and trees drooped, and trees
Groped upward in the gaps. The...

Page 162

...mud
Briar and fern strove to the blood.
The hooked liana in his...

Page 163

...sputters red
At even, for the innocent dead.

Why prate of peace? when,...

Page 164

...the finger of pain;
And out of the cloud that smites, beneficent rivers of...

Page 165

... All that was me is gone.


XLIII

TO S.R. CROCKETT

(ON RECEIVING A DEDICATION)

...

Page 166

... May upbraid me, dark and sour,
...

Page 167

...they stir our spirits vainly
When they come to us, Alcestis--
...

Page 168

... 3

Since I am sworn to live my life
And not to...

Page 169

...Wi' cauld an' weet,
An' to the Court, gin we 'se be late,
...

Page 170

... I have been changed from what I was before;
...

Page 171

...pool;

But still keeps up, by straight or bend,
The selfsame...

Page 172

...remain to eternity,
Those, only those, the bountiful choristers
...

Page 173

... HYERES, _May 1883_.


VIII

TO VIRGIL AND DORA WILLIAMS

Here, from the forelands...

Page 174

...In the fine Pacific Hislands
With the dollars of Peru:
...

Page 175

...OF BRAILLE

TO MRS. A. BAKER

I was a barren tree before,
...