The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 4

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

Page 1

... 111

THE STORY OF THE HOUSE WITH THE GREEN...

Page 2

...LAST OF THE TALL MAN ...

Page 3

...the news with delight, and
hastened to make ready. Long practice and a varied acquaintance of...

Page 4

...to the
nature of a gift as to the spirit in which it is offered."

"The spirit,...

Page 5

...special consideration. And on this great day for
me, when I am closing a career of...

Page 6

...a nobleman in masquerade. At least,
I am sure he is no soldier."

The Colonel smiled at...

Page 7

...when you saw me throw my
purse into the street the forty pounds were at an...

Page 8

...lined, and I need not say how readily I should share my
wealth with Godall. But...

Page 9

...(his hand was cold and wet). "You little
know in what a company you will begin...

Page 10

...myself uninformed; and what I know of its constitution, I
am not at liberty to communicate...

Page 11

...the three drove off in a four-wheeler.
They were not long upon the way before the...

Page 12

...Prince and Geraldine put their heads together for a moment. "Bear me
out in this," said...

Page 13

...information on that point."

"I?" cried the President. "A Suicide Club? Come, come! this is a...

Page 14

...as near as I can make out," answered the Prince:
"unadulterated laziness."

The President started. "D--n it,"...

Page 15

...began to go round among the guests.
Accustomed to play the host in the highest circles,...

Page 16

...that very night they should be scaling the stars and
commercing with the mighty dead.

"To the...

Page 17

...little immunities,
for which besides I pay at an advanced rate. Even as it is, my...

Page 18

...this club is the temple of intoxication.
If my enfeebled health could support the excitement more...

Page 19

...well enough; I cordially admire the
refinement of their minds; but it has been reserved for...

Page 20

...hands found their way,
one after the other, to his mouth, where they made clutches at...

Page 21

...is impossible for your Highness," replied the Colonel, "whose
honour is the honour of Bohemia. But...

Page 22

...forbid
the repetition of the hazard."

"There is much in what you say," replied Prince Florizel, "and...

Page 23

...are not much
company for me. Not but what Malthy had some poetry too; but it...

Page 24

...but his
mind was full of other thoughts. He recognised how foolish, how
criminal, had been his...

Page 25

...for; and he was surprised to find himself cursing them in his
heart. He put on...

Page 26

...recourse to law; and
discretion would forbid it equally if the oath were loosened. May I
inquire...

Page 27

...household. Not content with this,
discreet agents were put in possession of the house in Box...

Page 28

...hotel--was tenanted by an old English physician of
rather doubtful reputation. Dr. Noel, for that was...

Page 29

...grey eye
affected Silas with a sense of cold. He kept screwing his mouth from
side to...

Page 30

...do my utmost. But,
remember, the best of us may fail in such a matter."

"Tut!" returned...

Page 31

...on each in private, and most likely dangerous,
affairs? An amateur might have lost him by...

Page 32

...direction. Perhaps
this prolonged resistance wearied him, or perhaps he was in that frame
of mind when...

Page 33

...greatest vehemence.

"Alas!" she said; "I do not know whether I ought not to deplore this
moment,...

Page 34

...words in earnest."

"I think you may trust me to protect myself against intruders," he said,
not...

Page 35

...We do not care, in this house, to have lodgers who cannot meet
their liabilities."

"What the...

Page 36

...guided by an instinct,
he fell straight upon the matches, and, keeping his back towards the
bed,...

Page 37

...came this body in your room? Speak
freely to one who may be helpful. Do you...

Page 38

...you have been involved, your case is desperate upon
that side; and for the narrow eye...

Page 39

...decide. But
one thing I see plainly--the object of such a box is to contain a...

Page 40

...after having
diverted himself for a few days with the Parisian Carnival. It was my
fortune, a...

Page 41

...terrible, and criminal relations. It is to one of the
persons who then obeyed me that...

Page 42

...grisly contents. The
journey passed over without much incident, although the young man was
horrified to overhear...

Page 43

...of your porcelain injured.
Special orders were given along the line to deal tenderly with the
Prince's...

Page 44

...four
pairs of stairs, and looking towards the back. To this hermitage, with
infinite trouble and complaint,...

Page 45

...should not now become the hero
and spokesman of his native place of Bangor, Maine; he...

Page 46

...gold inspired him with all manner of
new terrors, if he so much as dared to...

Page 47

...embarrassment when I addressed
myself to you yesterday."

"Indeed," cried Silas, "I am innocent of everything except...

Page 48

...tried to murmur some
consolatory words, and burst into tears. The Prince, touched by his
obvious intention,...

Page 49

...adulation; and he waited at foreign watering-places and in Algiers
until the fame of his exploits...

Page 50

...drove off
through the rain into a maze of villas. One villa was so like another,
each...

Page 51

...a man of odd notions. But certainly I was hired to kidnap
single gentlemen in evening...

Page 52

...divided into two
groups, one about a roulette-board, and the other surrounding a table at
which one...

Page 53

...of any
one present but he seemed to catch and make a note of it. Brackenbury
began...

Page 54

...same name
farther down the street; and I have no doubt the policeman will be able
to...

Page 55

...guests, after all, had been dismissed; and now the
servants, who could hardly be genuine servants,...

Page 56

...but I cannot deny that you fill me with suspicious
thoughts. I go myself, as I...

Page 57

...Major O'Rooke."

And the veteran tendered his hand, which was red and tremulous, to the
young Lieutenant.

"Who...

Page 58

...friend's dilemma. I betook myself, as
soon as I had received this order, to a furnishing...

Page 59

...When the job is
done, we can cover it with a pile of stakes."

The first speaker...

Page 60

...I could offer you a more cheerful
programme; it is ungracious to inaugurate an acquaintance upon...

Page 61

...of the emotion
which obviously affected him as he spoke. He moved towards the door, and
placed...

Page 62

...who now raised his head and
addressed the captive President of the Suicide Club.

"President," he said,...

Page 63

...Prince.

"Oh, come!" cried the President. "With a fair field, who knows how
things may happen? I...

Page 64

...the Colonel and the Physician had an opportunity
to see, and the garden was so vast,...

Page 65

...meantime," said the Doctor, "let me go and bury my oldest
friend."


_And this_ (observes the erudite...

Page 66

...the possessor of the Rajah's Diamond was welcome in
the most exclusive circles; and he had...

Page 67

...good-bye, and I promise you to make the General smart for
his behaviour."

Harry's countenance fell; tears...

Page 68

...you can never
appreciate a shade of meaning. You are yourselves rapacious, violent,
immodest, careless of distinction;...

Page 69

...but not long enough to allow him a reply.

"But all this is beside our purpose,"...

Page 70

...the wife! How skilfully she could
evade an awkward question! with what secure effrontery she repeated...

Page 71

...returned Harry, "I am not accustomed to be
questioned in so high a key."

"You do not...

Page 72

...what way am I to construe your attitude, sir?" demanded Vandeleur.

"Why, sir, as you please,"...

Page 73

...he had a doubt of Lady Vandeleur herself; for
he found these obscure proceedings somewhat unworthy...

Page 74

..."I am only a secretary!"

"Do you mean that for me?" said the girl. "Because I...

Page 75

...is weary, and there is none to open for him.
Follow me!"

So saying she led Harry...

Page 76

...was his enemy, Charlie Pendragon could be no other than a
friend. But such was the...

Page 77

...with vigour and decision, and the most cautious forget their
prudence and embrace foolhardy resolutions. This...

Page 78

...loudly
in the narrow lane. The gardener had received his answer; and he looked
down into Harry's...

Page 79

...in the most inviting,
solid, and durable form, capable of being carried in an apron, beautiful
in...

Page 80

...look at my roses. I took the liberty to bring him in, for I thought
none...

Page 81

...the latter, after he had separated the jewels into two
nearly equal parts, and drawn one...

Page 82

...as for
you, scrape up your gaieties and put them in your pocket."

Harry proceeded to obey,...

Page 83

...by the
summersault, and once more lay glittering on the ground. He blessed his
fortune that the...

Page 84

...some
are lost, I am afraid, for ever, others, I am sure, may be still
recovered."

"Alas!" cried...

Page 85

...police were easily persuaded of
his innocence; and, after he had given what help he could...

Page 86

...window next the
door; and, as chance directed, his eyes met those of Mr. Rolles. The
nurseryman...

Page 87

...a fetich. The beauty of the stone
flattered the young clergyman's eyes; the thought of its...

Page 88

...smaller and barer than
usual; the materials for his great work had never presented so little
interest;...

Page 89

...am a patient reader; can the thing be learnt
in books?"

"You put me in a difficulty,"...

Page 90

...attended him through his slumber, and
he awoke refreshed and light-hearted with the morning sun.

Mr. Raeburn's...

Page 91

...head already remarkable and menacing in itself.

In his companion, the Prince of Bohemia, Mr. Rolles...

Page 92

...robust for such a trial. I myself, who have many duties and many
privileges of my...

Page 93

...whom
he would not have preferred--for it was old John Vandeleur, the
ex-Dictator.

The sleeping carriages on the...

Page 94

...he lay awake with his brain in
a state of violent agitation, and his eyes fixed...

Page 95

...progress; and
laying his hand on the door at the farther side, he proceeded cautiously
to draw...

Page 96

...widely, and his under jaw dropped in an
astonishment that was upon the brink of fury....

Page 97

...during the journey, and concluded in
these words:--

"When I recognised the tiara I knew we were...

Page 98

...a man
of sense and probity, had given him an excellent education at school,
and brought him...

Page 99

...to
take in yourself by many complimentary and, I have no doubt,
well-deserved reports."

Francis entreated him to...

Page 100

...Francis, in extreme disdain. "Worthy man, I know
every thought of his mind, every penny of...

Page 101

...and was shaved and had his hair dressed
every morning by a barber in a neighbouring...

Page 102

...stranger, out of pure good-will?
Are you not living largely on my bounty?"

"On your advances, Mr....

Page 103

...he was on the trail of the Dictator.

That gentleman's fury carried him forward at a...

Page 104

...green blinds were all drawn down upon the
outside; the door into the verandah was closed;...

Page 105

...below a blind; and he concluded, with great good sense,
that the bed-chambers were all upon...

Page 106

...and every day in the week you may
see her going by with a basket on...

Page 107

...turned from white to red before his eyes; and when he
cast a glance upon the...

Page 108

...street, the
pressure ceasing, he came to a halt, and the cool night air speedily
restored him...

Page 109

...presumption, and I shall
wait with all the patience I have," he said. "If I am...

Page 110

...by the side of the Dictator.

They spoke in tones so low, leaning over the table...

Page 111

...to the minute; he looked like a man upon
his guard, and spoke low and sparingly....

Page 112

...was completed. And next instant, and still laughing, Mr. Vandeleur
had turned again towards the table...

Page 113

...a chair was overset, and then Francis saw the father
and daughter stagger across the walk...

Page 114

..."Father and son? What d----d unnatural
comedy is all this? How do you come in my...

Page 115

...hands, uttering at the same time a tearless sob of agony. But Miss
Vandeleur once again...

Page 116

...You are in a greater danger
than you fancy. Promise me you will not so much...

Page 117

...he suppose that Miss Vandeleur
had left anything unsaid. Indeed, the young man was sore both...

Page 118

...and ornamented in gilt, which
opened by means of a spring, and disclosed to the horrified...

Page 119

...he scarce knew why. The society of this person did him good;
he seemed to touch...

Page 120

...deranged you for so small a matter."

And he dismissed him with a movement of his...

Page 121

...time by a sob;
in the other the Prince recognised the young man who had consulted...

Page 122

...it would not render them less absolute."

"Your Highness interprets my meaning with his usual subtlety,"...

Page 123

...you are humbled," said the Prince, "I command no longer; the
repentant have to do with...

Page 124

...residence was especially dear to the heart
of Prince Florizel; he never drew near to it...

Page 125

...guilty. This was not only an annoying
incident--it was a peril to his honour. What was...

Page 126

...you were wise and pious. You speak the truth, and
you speak it with an accent...

Page 127

...into that of another, who, terrified at what he sees,
gives it into the keeping of...

Page 128

...keeps a cigar store in Rupert Street, much
frequented by other foreign refugees. I go there...

Page 129

...meals, Northmour and I
spent four tempestuous winter months. I might have stayed longer; but
one March...

Page 130

...a hedge of elders huddled together by the
wind; in front, a few tumbled sand-hills stood...

Page 131

...and
autumn was beginning, in this exposed plantation. Inland the ground rose
into a little hill, which,...

Page 132

...afternoon the house had been plainly deserted; now it was
as plainly occupied. It was my...

Page 133

...entered by the back; this was the natural, and indeed the
necessary, conclusion; and you may...

Page 134

...den to cook myself a meal, of which I stood in great
need, as well as...

Page 135

...associate in this underhand affair.

I followed her at a little distance, taking advantage of the...

Page 136

...guests of
Northmour, it would show a change in his habits and an apostasy from his
pet...

Page 137

...in groups, the seamen returned to the beach. The wind
brought me the sound of a...

Page 138

...I knew for the
most implacable and daring of men, had run away! I could scarcely
believe...

Page 139

...lantern to examine the wound upon my
shoulder. It was a trifling hurt, although it bled...

Page 140

...and that
Northmour and the young lady remained alone together in the pavilion.
The idea, even then,...

Page 141

...him, flushed and lowering, and
cutting savagely with his cane among the grass. It was not...

Page 142

...with an
embarrassing intentness. Then she broke out--

"You have an honest face. Be honest like your...

Page 143

...no theory of her relations to Northmour;
but I felt none the less sure of my...

Page 144

...when you landed," was my answer; and I do not know
why, but it seemed satisfactory...

Page 145

...my glad heart that she--she herself--was not
indifferent to my suit. Many a time she has...

Page 146

...ever cared to relate it, before yesterday.
Suddenly she interrupted me, saying with vehemence--

"And yet, if...

Page 147

...himself in several instances somewhat
over-bold in speech and manner.

I listened, I need not say, with...

Page 148

...morning, at the same hour and
place, I was to make my report to Clara. She...

Page 149

...or Yucatan. But in all this there was no word of an Italian, nor
any sign...

Page 150

...the dark grey heaven that overspread
them; and I confess my incredulity received at that moment...

Page 151

...for some time gazing at the spot, chilled and
disheartened by my own reflections, and with...

Page 152

...the noises of
the storm effectually concealed all others.

It was, I daresay, half a minute before...

Page 153

...felt sure the neighbourhood
was alive with skulking foes. The light had been so suddenly and
surprisingly...

Page 154

...upon the beach, stood Northmour, his head lowered, his hands
behind his back, his nostrils white...

Page 155

...intonation.

"I am not afraid," said I.

"And so," he continued, "I am to understand that you...

Page 156

...to me."

She has since told me her reason for this step. As long as she...

Page 157

...abutting on the floor, some on the roof, and
others, in fine, against the opposite wall...

Page 158

...nor am I without
pride when I look back upon my own behaviour. For surely no...

Page 159

...of gold spectacles in
the place, and a pile of other books lay on the stand...

Page 160

...different thing:
sinful--I won't say no; but there is a gradation, we shall hope. And
talking of...

Page 161

...us beggars, between whom she has to choose. And as for
yourself, to make an end...

Page 162

...and
prepared a letter in Italian which he tied to the handle. It was signed
by both...

Page 163

...this suspense. I prefer death fifty times over. Stay
you here to watch the pavilion; I...

Page 164

...startled aspect
of the other.

"You were right," I said. "All is over. Shake hands, old man,...

Page 165

...us together, and rallied Clara on a
choice of husbands; but he continued to speak of...

Page 166

...four as white as
paper, and sat tongue-tied and motionless round the table.

"A snail," I said...

Page 167

...hurt. I felt that I could stand
to be shot at every day and all day...

Page 168

...up to their work
they won't be so particular."

A voice was now heard hailing us from...

Page 169

...arms, I could die with some pride and satisfaction.
And as it is, by God, I'll...

Page 170

...all burned
bravely. The fire had taken a firm hold already on the outhouse, which
blazed higher...

Page 171

...her faculties, had
displaced the barricade from the front door. Another moment, and she had
pulled it...

Page 172

...or how
we reached it, are points lost for ever to my recollection. The first
moment at...

Page 173

...the
dearest respect, laid my lips for a moment on that cold brow. It was
such a...

Page 174

...a sharp "Hist!" sounded from the thicket. I
started from the ground; but the voice of...

Page 175

...I broke out, "she shall know everything that I can
tell."

"You do not understand," he returned,...

Page 176

...they saw the island like a
large white patch, and the bridges like slim white spars,...

Page 177

...right, Villon and Guy Tabary were huddled together over a scrap
of parchment; Villon making a...

Page 178

...winked both his big eyes, and seemed to choke upon his
Adam's apple. Montfaucon, the great...

Page 179

...before he had time to move. A tremor
or two convulsed his frame; his hands opened...

Page 180

...was a woman," added Montigny with a sneer. "Sit up,
can't you?" he went on, giving...

Page 181

...from unpleasant thoughts by mere
fleetness of foot. Sometimes he looked back over his shoulder with...

Page 182

...the world. Two whites would have taken such a
little while to squander; and yet it...

Page 183

...thrown away in his childish passion. But he could
only find one white; the other had...

Page 184

...in the early night might very
well happen to him before morning. And he so young!...

Page 185

...a few taps,
he heard a movement overhead, a door opening, and a cautious voice
asking who...

Page 186

...a
supper honestly for this once, and cheat the devil."

He went boldly to the door and...

Page 187

...and if you are to eat I must
forage for you myself."

No sooner was his host...

Page 188

...to say that," agreed Villon, infinitely relieved. "As big
a rogue as there is between here...

Page 189

...his life upon the cast; he fights in the name of his
lord the king, his...

Page 190

...word. I wait God's summons contentedly in my own house,
or, if it please the king...

Page 191

...stealing, like any other piece of work or of danger. My
teeth chatter when I see...

Page 192

...made a
great error in life. You are attending to the little wants, and you have
totally...

Page 193

...rogue
and vagabond. I have passed an hour with you. Oh! believe me, I feel
myself disgraced!...

Page 194

...fainter and fainter against the flying clouds--a black speck
like a swallow in the tumultuous, leaden...

Page 195

...outlook
between high houses, as out of an embrasure, into the valley lying dark
and formless several...

Page 196

...fell against the wall with an ejaculation, and his sword rang
loudly on the stones. Two...

Page 197

...and gave vent to a
little noiseless whistle. What ailed the door? he wondered. Why was...

Page 198

...the arras,
and went in.

He found himself in a large apartment of polished stone. There were
three...

Page 199

...slight
but courteous inclination of the head. Partly from the smile, partly
from the strange musical murmur...

Page 200

...of matters became rapidly insupportable; and Denis, to put an end
to it, remarked politely that...

Page 201

...hard to please!" sneered the old
gentleman. "A likely stripling--not ill-born--and of her own choosing
too? Why,...

Page 202

...wore in the most elegant accoutrement even
while travelling. She paused--started, as if his yellow boots...

Page 203

...and war, for more
than threescore years, you forfeited, not only the right to question my
designs,...

Page 204

...the stair. For he knew
how much my uncle trusted me." She gave something like a...

Page 205

...some say in the matter of this marriage; and let me tell you at
once, I...

Page 206

...the
room with long, silent strides and raised the arras over the third of
the three doors....

Page 207

...last smiling
bow to the young couple, and followed by the chaplain with a hand-lamp.

No sooner...

Page 208

...world of womankind. Her hands were like her
uncle's; but they were more in place at...

Page 209

...moments, the
spectacle of what I cannot cure even with the sacrifice of my life."

"I am...

Page 210

...noise about it than my
own squeaking," answered he.

A look of pain crossed her face, and...

Page 211

...a sigh. "Here is the dawn."

And indeed the dawn was already beginning. The hollow of...

Page 212

...I


Monsieur Leon Berthelini had a great care of his appearance, and
sedulously suited his deportment to...

Page 213

...for that would have been impossible; and she had
acquired a little air of melancholy, attractive...

Page 214

...I have an eye, Elvira; I have a spirit of divination; and this
place is accursed....

Page 215

...with his waistcoat unbuttoned
and his hands behind his back, to superintend the sale and measurement
of...

Page 216

...drama; it was so dashing, so florid, and so
cavalier.

Elvira, on the other hand, sang her...

Page 217

...chanting for the twentieth
time; when up got the Commissary upon his feet and waved brutally...

Page 218

...When all seems over, and a man has made up his mind to
injustice, he has...

Page 219

...with a shudder.

And with that they set to work on their preparations. The tobacco-jar,
the cigarette-holder,...

Page 220

...my baggage? You dare to detain my baggage?" cried the
singer.

"Who are you?" returned the landlord....

Page 221

...no longer, I shall follow at once to
the Black Head."

And he set out to find...

Page 222

...sacred to repose and night-caps; and now
what was this? Window after window was opened; matches...

Page 223

...merely called precipitation
from the scene of this absurd adventure.




CHAPTER IV


To the west of Castel-le-Gachis four...

Page 224

...it was something to much the same purpose
from a French tragedy.

The young man drew near...

Page 225

...the career of an artist."

"Thank you," returned Stubbs, with a chuckle. "I'm going to be...

Page 226

...an athletic undergraduate pretension; but he had begun to suspect
that Berthelini liked a different sort...

Page 227

...in the wall and roof, and Leon began to hope it was a
studio.

"If it's only...

Page 228

...who is a dramatic artist!"

"You are heartless, Leon," said Elvira; "that woman is in trouble."

"And...

Page 229

...open, and a man in a blouse appeared on the threshold carrying a
lamp. He was...

Page 230

...of the house, as if
irresistibly attracted, followed him from canvas to canvas with the
lamp. Elvira...

Page 231

...demanded the use of some
tobacco; and he undid his fingers from Elvira's in order to...

Page 232

...him?"

I doubt if there ever were a more embarrassed company at a table; every
one looked...

Page 233

...least sing."

"You mistake Leon," returned his wife warmly. "He does not even pretend
to sing; he...

Page 234

...wished. He is obviously a
very loving painter; you have not yet tried him as a...