The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 25

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

Page 1

... 34
To Henry James ...

Page 2

... ...

Page 3

... 127
...

Page 4

... 178
To the Same ...

Page 5

... 252
To Miss Morse...

Page 6

... ...

Page 7

... 337
...

Page 8

... To Henry James ...

Page 9

...Mrs. Sitwell ...

Page 10

...Conan Doyle ...

Page 11

... ...

Page 12

...his diary given in Mr.
Graham Balfour's _Life_ (ed. 1906, pp. 312 f.). During part of...

Page 13

...correspondence turned to matters
literary or domestic, or humours of his own mind and character. These
letters,...

Page 14

...soon against them; with the native population they had no
influence or credit; affairs both political...

Page 15

...and he would have been
the first to acknowledge the merits of the new order had...

Page 16

...friend H. J. Moors in the evening, went to
church--no less--at the white and half-white church--I...

Page 17

...Samoan boy, on
the front balcony; and I am home again, and only sorry that I...

Page 18

...handiwork, and there were a lot
of sprouts and saplings and stones to be removed. Then...

Page 19

...not return by the stream; knife in hand, as long
as my endurance lasted, I was...

Page 20

...from Savaii; I once loathed, I now like and--pending fresh
discoveries--have a kind of respect for...

Page 21

...cut your foot off! Here, you boy, what you do there? You
no get work? You...

Page 22

...blows were echoes; at times I thought
the laughter was from birds. For our birds are...

Page 23

...sentimentalise over the tender thing. The tender thing has now taken
charge of this island, and...

Page 24

...dug; and Henry, at the head of a troop of underpaid
assistants, is hard at work...

Page 25

...passed over it; I was round in that
very place to see the weeding was done...

Page 26

...is all my design, and
I beg to warn you till we have the whole (or...

Page 27

... S
...

Page 28

... E R
...

Page 29

...of birds; I have
never lived in such a heaven; just now, I have fever, which...

Page 30

...both sides; infinite
noise; and a historic event--Mr. Clarke, the missionary, and his wife,
assisted at a...

Page 31

...chief behave in
such a case? etc.; and, I am bound to say, on any glimmer...

Page 32

...that
flourish on the islands--volunteered; Moors accepted, proposing to
follow and supervise: despatched his work and started...

Page 33

...of course, rejoicing
greatly. A characteristic feature: the argument of the pastors was
handed in in the...

Page 34

...of propriety. Presently Mr. Moors' Andrew rode up; I heard
the doctor was at the Forest...

Page 35

...waited and
was saved. It was a stirring three minutes, I can tell you.

I forgot in...

Page 36

...flank; view of the sea and mountains, sunrise, moonrise, and the
German fleet at anchor three...

Page 37

...is a prospect of much rain, much weeding
and making of paths, a little letters, and...

Page 38

...even. One night, when it was very dark, a man had put out a little
lantern...

Page 39

...see I should have gone W. or even
W. by S.; but it is not easy...

Page 40

...omelette of our hopes. The farmer's
lot is not a happy one. And it looks like...

Page 41

...has less
pretensions to be literature than Spurgeon's sermons. Yet I think even
through that, you will...

Page 42

...man of Tonga, and
his son, with the artificial joint to his arm--where the assassins shot
him...

Page 43

...has been known to court damsels with the like result,
but this is very rare; as...

Page 44

...be able to shut my own door
and make my own confusion! O to have the...

Page 45

...in
front green slopes to the sea, some fifty miles of which we dominate. We
see the...

Page 46

...come part by part in
pieces. Very soon I shall have no opinions left. And without...

Page 47

... Alan Breck Stewart. In the following letter, which belongs to an
...

Page 48

...me some of your Barrack Room Ballants, which are not of so
noble a strain as...

Page 49

...old drunken Joe, the Portuguese boatman, who seemed
to think himself specially charged with the reception,...

Page 50

... V ...

Page 51

...we should
reach our destination some five days too late.




TO MARCEL SCHWOB


...

Page 52

...set off to travel:
you do not divide me right. 0.6 of me is artist; 0.4,...

Page 53

...very good to them; when they go and we have lost our front-file
man we begin...

Page 54

...wreck; and now, Wednesday week, am a good deal picked
up, but yet not quite a...

Page 55

... Literature at the University of Vienna and afterwards at Dundee, had
...

Page 56

...he still afloat? Harmless bark! I gather you
ain't married yet, since your sister, to whom...

Page 57

...grey
pows on my verandah.--Yours sincerely,

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO SIDNEY COLVIN


...

Page 58

...that which I am unable to see while writing.

I said I was tired; it is...

Page 59

...while I groped in slime
after viscous roots, nursing and sparing little spears of grass, and
retreating...

Page 60

...since, by the acceptation of a bargain quite unsuitable to all my
methods.[17]

To-day I have had...

Page 61

...door,
commanding green meads, two or three forest trees casting their boughs
against the sky, a forest-clad...

Page 62

...to you. If I take to my pipe, I know
myself--all is over for the morning....

Page 63

...by the change, and possibly get
more stuff for Letters. In the meanwhile, I am seized...

Page 64

...had no fever. The day was
otherwise uneventful. I am reminded; I had another visitor on...

Page 65

...to be something in my
appearance which suggests endless, ovine long-suffering! We sat in the
upper verandah...

Page 66

...the treacherous posts, and the perils of
the sea, and the carelessness of authors. I love...

Page 67

...to my
unhappy predecessor on the causey of Auld Reekie. You will never know,
nor will any...

Page 68

...little place in purgatory.
But I prefer hell: would I could always dig in those red...

Page 69

...about us, the little island of our clearing, studded with brave
old gentlemen (or ladies, or...

Page 70

...I have been in several corners) of an inconsiderable
planet. You remain in my mind for...

Page 71

...and we are still foolish
enough to look forward to a little peace. I am a...

Page 72

...and can do nothing, and toil to be at my
pen, and see some ink behind...

Page 73

...good deal of money regarded simply
as money. K. is bosh; I have no use for...

Page 74

...oblige me by reading that
form of words once more, and see if a light does...

Page 75

...wish letters of
that charming quality could be so timed as to arrive when a fellow
wasn't...

Page 76

...never have been angry) when I thought you were the
swallower of a (tinfoil) formula.

I must...

Page 77

...same.




TO CHARLES BAXTER


The following refers again to the project of a long...

Page 78

...straight. The whole floor is
filled with them, and (what's worse) most of the shelves forbye;...

Page 79

...Apemama_

VII. The Royal Traders.
VIII. Foundation of Equator Town.
IX. The...

Page 80

...devil take
the man! Yesterday it was about 5.30, which I can stand; day before 5,
which...

Page 81

...long;
perhaps it should be rather very short? Be sure you give me your views
upon these...

Page 82

...of Saint Johnsbury, in the county of Caledonia, in the state of
Vermont, United States of...

Page 83

...guest here: a welcome guest: my Sydney music master, whose health
broke down, and who came...

Page 84

...was
young"; and I thought it an odd word, of a woman in the height of
health,...

Page 85

...it will be cruel stale to read about, when all's over and done, as
it will...

Page 86

...morning and a few days
ago it was 63, and we have all been perishing with...

Page 87

...Apia, and scarce a penny
on the King; they have forgot they were in Samoa, or...

Page 88

...Ulufanua, on which
I mean to lay several stories; the _Bloody Wedding_, possibly the _High
Woods_--(O, it's...

Page 89

...it's good. I am
not shining by modesty; but I do just love the colour and...

Page 90

...wrong in my
judgment, but I am in treaty with my honour. I know not how...

Page 91

...the vile attitude I put myself
in if I blow the gaff on Cedercrantz behind his...

Page 92

...of the forces, a very nice young
beardless Swede, became nervous, and conceived a plan. How...

Page 93

...worse in
this kind of thing) some literaryisms. One of the puzzles is this: It is
a...

Page 94

...of the
signatories wants another paragraph added, which I have not yet been
able to draw, and...

Page 95

...then probably to be married, and we shall see him no
more. I told him he...

Page 96

...his advisership to the King; given way to the
consuls' objections and resigned all--then fell out...

Page 97

...sure you would be amazed if you knew what a
good hand I am at keeping...

Page 98

...paper and ink
I count you the paragon, call you the pink.
The...

Page 99

...far, and
thus to place it in the Magazine might be an actual saving.

I am swallowed...

Page 100

...yarn has to come
to an end some time. Please look it over for carelessnesses, and...

Page 101

...the bath
hour; 4.30, bath; 4.40, eat two heavenly mangoes on the verandah, and
see the boys...

Page 102

...sacred puppet
without consuls' permission, two days' notice, and an approved
interpreter--read (I suppose) spy. Then back;...

Page 103

...aristocratic, I fear, for that. God
knows I don't care who I chum with; perhaps like...

Page 104

...agreed with any
party, and see merits and excuses in all; should do it (if I...

Page 105

...study," and sit a long while silent on my
eggs. Unconscious thought, there is the only...

Page 106

...is already quite surprising.

I wish you would tell your father--not that I like to encourage...

Page 107

..._The Wrecker_ is a good
yarn of its poor sort, and it is certainly well nourished...

Page 108

...Laupepa. IV. Brandeis. V. Will probably be called "The
Rise of Mataafa." VI. _Furor Consularis_--a devil...

Page 109

...are, the stuff is true,
and I believe the more effective; after all, what I wish...

Page 110

...I am going to call it
_A Footnote to History: Eight Years of Trouble in Samoa_,...

Page 111

...the idleness; blew on the pipe to
Belle's piano; then had a ride in the forest...

Page 112

...words! and hours going to
and fro among my notes. However, this is the way it...

Page 113

...and to see that you spell my name
right. This is a point (for some reason)...

Page 114

...inducing folk at home to read matter so extraneous and
outlandish. I become heavy and owlish;...

Page 115

...habit of sending out for Stevenson's
reading books that seemed likely to interest...

Page 116

...with
the _Tragic Muse_; I thought the Muse herself one of your best works; I
was delighted...

Page 117

...much
excavated, so that I passed under fallen trees without stooping.
Suddenly it turned sharply to the...

Page 118

...instead of the sombre piling up of tree behind tree. And
here I had two scares--first,...

Page 119

...who had now been left alone for perhaps forty minutes in the bush.

The return was...

Page 120

...bottom, a good quantity; perhaps thirty or forty cubic
feet, with pools and waterfalls. A tree...

Page 121

...right, for the Times article was in the spirit I wished
to arouse. I hope we...

Page 122

...steady, but a huge offensive continent of
clouds and vapours forming to leeward. It might be...

Page 123

...quite ended. The
heaven was all a mottled grey; even the east quite colourless; the
downward slope...

Page 124

...close on five hours this morning; the day before,
close on nine; and unless I finish...

Page 125

...this will
brace him up. I am, as you see, a tower of strength. I can...

Page 126

...record of his holiday in the South Seas, in the
shape of...

Page 127

... their own language was the story of the _Bottle Imp_, "which found
...

Page 128

...it approaches the sea, a Samoan stream begins in bubbling
plenty and...

Page 129

...up the incompetence, and
worse, of the responsible Treaty officials. In August he took lively
pleasure in...

Page 130

...go three more chapters of
the wretched History; as you see, I approach the climax. I...

Page 131

...But will you not run dry of
fairy stories? Please salute your pupils, and tell them...

Page 132

...of
great trees, not so much unlike the trees at home, only here and there
are some...

Page 133

...all like the king or his people,
who are brown and very pretty; but these are...

Page 134

...always trembling
and looking about for the coming of the women-devils.

Sometimes the women-devils go down out...

Page 135

...I am mending famously,
come and go on the balcony, have perfectly good nights, and though...

Page 136

...ten, I think--who
have to be kept all moving, and give the effect of a society....

Page 137

...and often recurrent desire to thank you for your
work--you are one of four that have...

Page 138

...the bed and bosom of Lafaele, the Archangel
Hercules, prefect of the cattle. There was a...

Page 139

...the
consequence was I was laid down with diarrhoea and threatenings of
Samoa colic for the inside...

Page 140

...David is on his feet, and doing well, and very much in love, and
mixed up...

Page 141

...I got
into my Saranac snow boots; Lauilo got a cutlass; Mary Carter, our
Sydney maid, joined...

Page 142

...tale is practically in two divisions. In the first
James More and the M'Gregors, and Catriona,...

Page 143

...Fire. IX. I
begin to be haunted with a red-headed man. X. The Wood by Silvermills.
XI....

Page 144

... ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO MRS. CHARLES FAIRCHILD


The projected visit of Mr. Kipling,...

Page 145

...do well to knock the passage
out, and leave his boguey tale a boguey tale, and...

Page 146

...but I mean to teach my ear better
before I am done with it or this...

Page 147

...fash and bobbery over a rotten end of an old nursery yarn, not worth
spitting on...

Page 148

...with his wife, and was kept rigorously on the front
verandah below! You see what a...

Page 149

...eyes with sudden effort.--Washerwoman and
precentor, Helen, Tomas's wife. This is our weak point; we are...

Page 150

...Call it _Subpriorsford_.

Two nights ago the club had its first meeting; only twelve were present,
but...

Page 151

...is
the devil to pay. I think the Master kills him in a duel, but don't...

Page 152

...I believe, and it must go as it is! But, of
course, this book is not...

Page 153

...Tus

Ex.: _He_ seized _tum_ by _tus_ throat; but _tu_ at the same moment
caught _him_ by...

Page 154

...against
him, I find objection growing....

But there is yet another argument I have to lay before...

Page 155

...man knows Samoa but must see its huge advantages. Excuse
this long and tedious lecture, which...

Page 156

...much
worked into the story, and I have alluded in the dedication to our
common fancy for...

Page 157

...customary in the
tropics, of the dark sphere with its little gilt band upon the belly.
The...

Page 158

...me.) I can read Samoan now, though not speak
it. It was to ask me for...

Page 159

...the residences of white
officials. To understand how I have been occupied, you must know that
"Misi...

Page 160

...same charger, squinted up at my
perch and remarked, "There's a sweet little cherub that sits...

Page 161

...fences to jump, nasty beastly jumps--the next morning we found
one all messed with blood where...

Page 162

...among the black mud and the green
mangroves, and the black and scarlet crabs, to Mulinuu,...

Page 163

...be reached in certain cases. Take Ruth, i. _vv._ 8 to
13, and imagine how those...

Page 164

...consented, nobody would pay; 'tis a farce, and the curtain is
going to fall briefly. Consequently...

Page 165

...off in the _Curacoa_
when she comes.

I have celebrated my holiday from _Samoa_ by a plunge...

Page 166

...a wholly, tragic sequel, which I desire to
make thinkable right through, and sensible; to make...

Page 167

...to make a position
for the wreck of one of the noblest figures of a man...

Page 168

...not written for me but for
Miss Manners; but I mean to break that frost inside...

Page 169

...By 7.30 Belle and I had breakfast; we had scarce done
before my mother was at...

Page 170

...the canoe
alone, and Belle and I and Tauilo set off on foot for Malie. Tauilo...

Page 171

...with polite sacramental exaggerations, by the official
receiver. He, a stalwart, well-oiled quadragenarian, shone with sweat
from...

Page 172

...thing
that particularly caught me (by good luck), a single turtle "for the
king"--_le tasi mo le...

Page 173

...than I was to be going. I had a little
serious talk with Mataafa on the...

Page 174

...stone, it was the
outside; but his blood was up. He took stroke, moved the big...

Page 175

...cook should cut it up; and we got a
damaged shell, and two splendid meals, beefsteak...

Page 176

...to ask for in a novel. I have finished
drafting Chapter XX. to-day, and feel it...

Page 177

...most of that night walked the verandah with extraordinary
convictions of guilt and ruin, many of...

Page 178

...chief people, male and female, were placed with
our family, the rest between S. and the...

Page 179

...his family in the bush.--"But he has no family in the bush," said
Lloyd. "No," said...

Page 180

...was a family
secret of his own. Some leaves were brought mysteriously in; chewed,
placed on the...

Page 181

...to be sure.

It came over me the other day suddenly that this diary of mine...

Page 182

...make your hair curl, if you had any
left.

R. L. S.




TO...

Page 183

...LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO E. L. BURLINGAME


_Vailima, Summer 1892._

MY DEAR BURLINGAME,--First of...

Page 184

...verandah; and
there on the lawn beheld my crazy boy with an axe in his hand...

Page 185

...and when I
come home for the holidays, I should like to have a pony.--I am,...

Page 186

...G. M.'s
_Joy of Earth_ volume and _Love in a Valley_; and I do not know...

Page 187

...Masson. _The
Wrecker_ has turned up. So far as I have seen, it is very satisfactory,
but...

Page 188

...can't be anything really wrong. Pretty soon we all
go to Holland, and be hanged; thence...

Page 189

...be brought together. When Austin is not engaged in building
forts, nor on his lessons, which...

Page 190

...broad leaves and slab-sided roots are European oaks; and the
places on the road up (where...

Page 191

...of residence by a
Surrey gipsy. And if you come to that, even the lean man...

Page 192

...deal more than half) of David
Balfour ready for press. This is pretty satisfactory, and I...

Page 193

...of Captain Morse and always had detested
all that I was told, and detested the man...

Page 194

...beginning serial publication in December. If
this could be managed, what with D.B., the apparent success...

Page 195

...it entirely.
Act II. On Graham's arrival I gave him my room and came out to...

Page 196

...went down about two o'clock in company with a couple
of chance visitors to Apia. It...

Page 197

...two cousins instead of
one, that the second was a lady, unused to Samoan manners, and...

Page 198

...of a Waverley novel. "The wife of the new Governor of New
South...

Page 199

...[_Vailima, August 1892._]

MY DEAR COLVIN,--This is Friday night, the (I believe) 18th or 20th
August or...

Page 200

...we came to the last village, I sent
Henry on ahead to warn the King of...

Page 201

...good--and went across in the hour when the east
is yellow and the morning bank is...

Page 202

...cup-bearers marched up and down the house and
passed the cup on, five times it was...

Page 203

...of the authors had
to draw a portrait of him or herself in a Ouida light....

Page 204

...to our billiard room in Haggard's back garden, where we found
Lloyd and where Graham joined...

Page 205

...a loss, suddenly between the showers out broke the note of a
harmonium and a woman's...

Page 206

...yesterday, the citation being wrung from me by remembrance of
many reviews. I have now received...

Page 207

...brown in the cook-house, and countless
blacks to see the black boy Arrick.

Which reminds me, Arrick...

Page 208

...New Youth is that, with
such rickety and risky problems always at heart, they should not...

Page 209

...by your leave! It is your own fault, you have amused
and interested me so much...

Page 210

...that his little stomach began to
stick out like a pigeon's breast; and then the food...

Page 211

...grins and giggles, and little steps out of
dances, and little droll ways, to attract people's...

Page 212

...hate and fear them because they are cannibals,
sit and tell tales of them about their...

Page 213

...one of our dreadful days of rain, the sound of it like a
great waterfall or...

Page 214

...happen next; and in his fear and excitement,
he laid hold with his little slim black...

Page 215

...hot, and
deeply unwholesome afternoon. Belle had the lad behind her; I had a pint
of champagne...

Page 216

...Major Bouroche and the operations, all beyond discussion; and
every word about the Emperor splendid.

_September 30th._--_David...

Page 217

...Turkish and it's not Roman and it's not
Indian, but it seems to partake of the...

Page 218

... _Vailima, Samoa [Autumn 1892]._

_To the Artist who did the illustrations to "Uma."_

DEAR...

Page 219

...I
should have been able to give so much help and pleasure to your sister
is the...

Page 220

...up the pen for my correspondence, I doubt
you would never have heard from me again...

Page 221

...think there are on my pay rolls
at the present moment thirteen human souls, not counting...

Page 222

...tragic, I think you
will allow; and I was inclined to fancy it was the fault...

Page 223

...of tomatoes and crayfish, a good Indian curry, a tender
joint of beef, a dish of...

Page 224

...been waiting;
and that was to interview the doctor on another matter. Off I set in...

Page 225

...no pig. Some of the boys seemed to
give a doubtful account of themselves; our next...

Page 226

...the Bible,
and repeated clause by clause after me the following oath--I fear it may
sound even...

Page 227

...German officialdom, and
should probably have to leave _sponte mea_, which is only less
picturesque and more...

Page 228

...and fondle,
and smile at your puppets. Once you had done that, your honour was
committed--at the...

Page 229

...your munificent cheque for three hundred and fifty dollars. Glad you
liked the Scott voyage; rather...

Page 230

...our family. First of
all, the poor soul at Nukufetau is an old friend of ours,...

Page 231

...between the powers at home, and that the issue (like all else
connected with Samoa) is...

Page 232

...trackless black night and down a road that was rather fitted
for the _Curacoa_ than any...

Page 233

...find I can pay for it. For all
which mercies, etc. I must have made close...

Page 234

...please communicate at once with Charles Baxter whether you have or
have not received a letter...

Page 235

..._The Lesson of the Master_, and I remember
receiving _Marbot_: was that our last relation?

Hey, well!...

Page 236

...Three. And with Kipling, as you know, there are
reservations to be made. And you and...

Page 237

...you are a Scotchman--though to be sure I know
nothing of that country, being only an...

Page 238

...beautiful,
for I want you to come here and see for yourself. Everybody on the
premises except...

Page 239

...I have no proof at
all of _D. Balfour_, which is far more serious. How about...

Page 240

...the water, the straining, the handling of
the cup, the drinking out...

Page 241

...less fortunate one for the
inmates than the last. A proclamation concerning penalties for sedition
in the...

Page 242

...Scotland. He fell into arrears in regard to one or
two magazine stories for which he...

Page 243

...South-Seayer to see Hawaiian
women dressed like Samoans, but I guess that's all one to you...

Page 244

...I depreciated the _B. I._; I can't think
wherefore; I always particularly liked it--one of my...

Page 245

...requires to be attended to. It looks to me very like as
if _St. Ives_ would...

Page 246

...the whole idea of political affairs. Success in that field
appears to be the organisation of...

Page 247

...by me, but will want another dressing for luck. It
is merely a story of adventure,...

Page 248

...to call it _The Schooner Farallone: a tract
by R. L. S._ and _L. O._ It...

Page 249

...whereupon I took up,
pitched into, and about one half demolished another tale, once intended
to be...

Page 250

...pleurisy.
Poor Fanny had very little fun of her visit, having been most of the
time on...

Page 251

... York, and had at first delightedly welcomed the idea that his own
...

Page 252

...regular Scots verb.

15. See Allan Ramsay's works.

15, 16. Ay, and that is one of the...

Page 253

...least.--Yes, the blood money.--I am bothered about the portmanteau;
it is the presence of Catriona that...

Page 254

...I knew they were a difficulty; determined to
carry them through in a conversation; approached this...

Page 255

...Here are no trains, only men pacing
barefoot. No cars or carriages; at worst the rattle...

Page 256

...the postscript here is, I believe, to the Journals
of the Society for...

Page 257

...excellently planted, and old Folau--"the
Samoan Jew"--sitting and whistling there in his new-found and
well-deserved well-being. It...

Page 258

...je me recuse_.

We call it _The Ebb Tide: a Trio and Quartette_; but that secondary...

Page 259

...I'm only bragging for a change before I return to the darned
thing lying waiting for...

Page 260

...as the mail is to take it. Chapter X. is now in Lloyd's hands for
remarks,...

Page 261

...can only hope the intrinsic horror and pathos, and a kind of fierce
glow of colour...

Page 262

...I see nothing of it in his accounts. Query, was
that lost? I should not like...

Page 263

...I fear; but Lord Justice-Clerk Hermiston ought to be a plum. Of
other schemes, more or...

Page 264

...in the most delicate manner in the
world to insinuate a few commissions:--

No. 1. Is for...

Page 265

...I think you might be interested to hear, I was
sculpt a second time by a...

Page 266

...a gallery of variants that would surprise you.
And this sort of trouble (which I cannot...

Page 267

...a real
chivalrous yarn, like the Dumas' and yet unlike. Thereafter to the
meeting of the five...

Page 268

... ...

Page 269

...westward, very unusual kind of weather; I was standing out on the
little verandah in front...

Page 270

...Blue-book, depressing letter
from C.; a long, amusing ramble from my mother; vast masses of Romeike;
they...

Page 271

...end of the
ever-to-be-execrated _Ebb Tide_, or Stevenson's Blooming Error. Also, a
paper apart for _David Balfour_....

Page 272

...(which had probably miscarried), and in a
humour between frowns and smiles wrote to him no...

Page 273

...and I grind away with an odd, dogged, down
sensation--and an idea _in petto_ that the...

Page 274

...this way and that, and get up and throw 'em down, and say damn,
and go...

Page 275

...this presentment she is "pale, penetratin', and
interestin'."

As you are aware, I have been wading deep...

Page 276

...of materials weighs upon me. My
grandfather is a delightful comedy part; and I have to...

Page 277

...go and do it, sir, in the living flesh!

I thought Bourget was a friend of...

Page 278

...the alarm proved false. There were no
signs of any gathering in Apia proper, and the...

Page 279

...the lady was no less excited; all had cartridge-belts.
We stayed but a little while to...

Page 280

...and men sitting with Winchesters in my
mind's eye? No; war is a huge _entrainement_; there...

Page 281

...at
last a drum and a penny whistle playing in Vaiusu, and a cricket match
on the...

Page 282

...they found it "so uncomfortable." After dinner a messenger
came up to me with a note,...

Page 283

...is a blow to them,
and the resistance was far greater than had been anticipated--which is...

Page 284

...corner, another young man, very patient and brave, lies
wholly deserted. Yet he seems to me...

Page 285

...I believe you could not help
liking. Our horses are the devil, of course, miserable screws,...

Page 286

...peep-show; I held some of the things at an
operation, and did not care a dump.

_Tuesday,...

Page 287

...to their deaths? How had they acquired so
considerable a business at an age so early?...

Page 288

...ever,

R. L. S.




TO A. CONAN DOYLE


...

Page 289

...Lungs
pretty right, stomach nowhere, spirits a good deal overshadowed; but
we'll come through it yet, and...

Page 290

...III.
I know nothing of, as I told you. And Chapter IV. is at present all...

Page 291

...the bottle?"
Alas, my friends (I feel tempted to say), you will find it by the
Engineer's...

Page 292

...conviction that I was a great hand
at writing inscriptions, and meant to exhibit and test...

Page 293

...shall be very much obliged. I am pleased
indeed to learn some of my books have...

Page 294

...Rodin's (which native taste
regards as _prodigieusement leste_) presiding over all from the top--and
to hear the...

Page 295

...Mariette, if you please; and my wife sends her most kind
remembrances to yourself.

...

Page 296

...SIDNEY COLVIN


On a first reading of the incomplete MS. of _The Ebb...

Page 297

...be wholly bad. It is written in rather a funny
style; a little stilted and left-handed;...

Page 298

...play demands is of all tasks the most
ungrateful? And I have done it a long...

Page 299

...they're all there, I'll go bail.
Three types of the bad man, the weak man, and...

Page 300

...had
not only our own nine out-door workers, but a contract party that we
took on in...

Page 301

...recluse lady,
_abreuvee d'injures qu'elle est_. Had a rather annoying lunch on board
the American man-of-war, with...

Page 302

...behold, it was
_Au mai taua ma manu-vao!_ You would scarce recognise me, if you heard
me...

Page 303

...object was to show Belle that gaudy
valley of the Vaisigano which the road follows. If...

Page 304

... of outside
...

Page 305

... ...

Page 306

...for your voluminous and delightful
collections. Baxter--so soon as it is ready--will let you see a...

Page 307

...Samoa, December 3rd, 1893._

DEAR RUSSELL,--I have to thank you very much for your capital letter,
which...

Page 308

...1685._--At Privy Council, George Murray, Lieutenant of the
King's Guard, and others, did, on the 21st...

Page 309

...if there be any reasonable work--but no,
I must call a halt....

I fear the song looks...

Page 310

...same sort of fool that we
are, only better-looking, with all the faults of Vailimans and...

Page 311

...name. The same book had stood already on my
shelves; I had read articles of yours...

Page 312

...turn of scrivener's palsy; my hand got worse; and for the
first time, I received clean...

Page 313

...on the starving of the visual sense in that book. 'Tis true, and
unless I make...

Page 314

...who watch them!

The gaol is a wretched little building, containing a little room, and
three cells,...

Page 315

...whites present,
except Wurmbrand, and still I had no suspicion of the truth. They began
to take...

Page 316

...causes for
anxiety; it _might_ have been put up, to connect with a Tamasese rising.
Tusitala and...

Page 317

...midst,
comes a plausible scheme to make Vailima pay, which will perhaps let me
into considerable expense...

Page 318

...of his name.

[70] The bust was exhibited in the New Gallery Summer Exhibition,...

Page 319

...birthday and
of the American Thanks-giving feast brought evidences hardly less
welcome, after so much contention and...

Page 320

...on his tomb--the words which we have seen him putting on paper
when he was at...

Page 321

...and the thing remain still in a manner private? We could supply
photographs of the illustrations--and...

Page 322

...but to come once and get the living colour into them. I am used
to it;...

Page 323

...books of double
entry, and sculp, and scalp. It might be. You have a lot of...

Page 324

...of
battle, deportation was the least to be looked for. He said he had a
letter of...

Page 325

...that I had been wiser than he. But the cream of the jest is
that I...

Page 326

...do not use it to a gentleman, I would not write it
of a gentleman: I...

Page 327

...C. Congdon, to E. M. G. Bates,
and to Mr. Edward Hugh Higlee Bates, and the...

Page 328

...your side of the ocean, I should know comparatively few of
them.

My amanuensis deserts me--I should...

Page 329

...I had made all
my points on the idea that they were unshaved and clothed anyhow.
However,...

Page 330

...particulars.

The whole thing was nothing but a bottomless scare; it was _obviously_
so; you couldn't make...

Page 331

...which I took up at the request of the late American Land
Commissioner; I am trying...

Page 332

... _Vailima, Samoa, April 17th, 1894._

MY DEAR MEREDITH,--Many good things have the gods sent...

Page 333

...dear Meredith, my love and respect.

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.


_P.S._--My wife joins...

Page 334

...but if they are going to take my advice and put up a simple
tablet with...

Page 335

...I
hope you will congratulate Burne Jones from me on his baronetcy. I
cannot make out to...

Page 336

...I think my wife is the proper person to receive
the dedication of my life's work....

Page 337

...the young men, Mr. Stevenson?" said
she--but when I remember that I felt indignant at even...

Page 338

..._Dancing Infants_, _Roads_, _An
Autumn Effect_, _Forest Notes_ (but this should come at the end of...

Page 339

...be pushed back. From which of
any number of dozen little families in Cunningham we should...

Page 340

... ...

Page 341

... ...

Page 342

... ...

Page 343

...are disbelievers in the morrow--perhaps I should say, rather, in
next year. The future is _always_...

Page 344

...jealousy of the
smallest kind, as compared to which the artist's is of a grave, modest
character--the...

Page 345

...if I fail in it; but a gallant attempt. All my weary reading as a
boy,...

Page 346

...It would not do to
separate John and Robert.

In short, I am only sorry I ever...

Page 347

...much to tell
me of Meredith--and the time was so short--that I gave up the
intervening days...

Page 348

...They, the officers, are all very intimate with us, and the
front verandah is known as...

Page 349

...roses in front of it, looking at the palm-trees on the village
street, and listening to...

Page 350

...obediently on through the whole number. It is a
graceful book, essentially graceful, with its haunting...

Page 351

...wage to chop with the back of an axe
on a fallen trunk. "Damned if I...

Page 352

...to forgive your old friend; and if you will be so very
good, continue to give...

Page 353

...a
hillside and carving mottoes on a stick, strong and well; and as a
younger man, running...

Page 354

...charming officers and
charming seamen. They gave a ball last month, which was very rackety and
joyous...

Page 355

...to breakfast with him to-morrow; the
next day the whole party of us lunch on the...

Page 356

...Kirriemuir,
which it was like your kindness to propose. By the way, I was twice in
Kirriemuir,...

Page 357

...pronounced in a
clangorous voice her verdict. "You give me very much the effect of a
coward,...

Page 358

...the dark about this new work of yours:[79]
what is to become of me afterwards? You...

Page 359

...the most unpopular man in Samoa, who broke his
neck, at the descent of Magiagi, from...

Page 360

...is looking up. The above is wholly impromptu.--On oath,

TUSITALA.




TO SIDNEY...

Page 361

...a lucid, almost superhuman, and wholly ghostly
gusto. "By the ghost of a mathematician" the book...

Page 362

...in the silence of the
Presidential mansion, and with whom (and a couple of camp stools)...

Page 363

...(boom). It is my friends of the
_Curacoa_, the _Falke_, and the _Bussard_ bombarding (after all
these--boom--months)...

Page 364

...I
visited was W. E. Henley, which did not make very tedious visits, so
I'll not get...

Page 365

...nature of lust--and you draw four sevens and a nine, and the
seven and nine of...

Page 366

...originally contributed by various
writers to Mr. Jerome's periodical The Idler, under the...

Page 367

...10th._--I know I have something else to say to you, but
unfortunately I awoke this morning...

Page 368

...them, that they had now been set at liberty without condition,
whereas some of the other...

Page 369

...served out the new tools, and I am sorry to say damned the
Government up hill...

Page 370

...his cousin a letter announcing, among
other things, the birth of a son...

Page 371

...a Great Historian,
and I was his blessed clerk, and did not know it; and you...

Page 372

...monkeys!

No, I am right about Jean Lillie. Jean Lillie, our double
great-grandmother, the daughter of David...

Page 373

...ago--what was I to say? and what could Lloyd do? I, as a personal
artist, can...

Page 374

...religions that they
cannot see and make venerable that which they ought to see first and
hallow...

Page 375

...find it in the forms Stevinetoun, Stevensoune, Stevensonne, Stenesone,
Stewinsoune, M'Stein, and MacStephane. My family, and...

Page 376

...enemies. It was very much applauded. Secondly,
it was not Poe, it was Mataaf[=a] (don't confuse...

Page 377

...have managed to please
the journalists. But I am a fictitious article and have long known...

Page 378

...would miss in the great
world, and indeed, to-day, I am almost ready to call the...

Page 379

...you flourish.--Yours ever,

TUSITALA.




TO ALISON CUNNINGHAM


For a fuller...

Page 380

...of
domestic life at Vailima. I had read your _Gleams of Memory_, No. 1; it
then went...

Page 381

...business. I have always said that there
is nothing like pain; toothache, dumb-ague, arthritic gout, it...

Page 382

...longest visit from one of the blue-jackets,
her partner in the last ball. About one on...

Page 383

...and damned bad ones too, and it is of a tolerable length, a
hundred thousand, I...

Page 384

...in the Savile Club: "No quarter to publishers!"
So I will ask you to present my...

Page 385

...and kind letter. I
shall certainly take your advice and call my cousin, the Lyon King,...

Page 386

...Samoa, December 1, 1894._

I AM afraid, my dear Weg, that this must be the result...

Page 387

...more swimmingly now. You
will understand perhaps that what so particularly pleased me in the new
volume,...

Page 388

...since it
seems as if you would continue to enjoy life. May you write many more
books...

Page 389

...the _mot propre_.

[80] A proposed frontispiece for one of the volumes of the...

Page 390

...in the chair, breathing heavily, his family about
him frenzied with grief, as they realised all...

Page 391

...man of higher
rank, whose incipient consumption had often troubled the Master.

"Talofa Tusitala!" he said as...

Page 392

...that same peak of Vaea as the spot that
should ultimately receive his war-worn body: Soalu,...

Page 393

...THE CHIEFS ON THE OPENING OF THE ROAD OF
GRATITUDE, OCTOBER 1894


Mr. Stevenson said, "We are...

Page 394

...that you were a company of warriors in a battle,
fighting for the defence of our...

Page 395

...may go
through great tracts of the land and scarce meet a man or a smoking
house,...

Page 396

...cuts
down trees, and kills pigs and wounded men. It is the man who makes
roads, who...

Page 397

...still remember and bless them for that convenience, and say to
one another, that as the...

Page 398

...Burns, essay on, projected, xxiii. 191,
192, 193

Allen, Grant, ballade...

Page 399

...30, 34; xxv. 290, 291, 292

"Auld Licht Idylls" (Barrie), xxv. 264

"Auntie's...

Page 400

...384

Bates, E. M. G., xxv. 384

Bates, J. H., letter to, xxv....

Page 401

...55; success, xxiv. 68; suggested French version, xxiv. 398

"Black Canyon" (L. Osbourne), xxiii....

Page 402

...Browning, Robert, xxiv. 107, 202; book on, by Gosse, xxv. 74

Bruce, Michael, xxiii....

Page 403

...(Underwoods), xxiv. 89, 231

"Canterbury Pilgrimage" (Chaucer), illustrated, gift of, xxiv. 149

"Capitaine...

Page 404

...98

Chair of History and Constitutional Law, Edinburgh University,
candidature for,...

Page 405

...Clytie, bust of, xxiii. 170

Cockfield Rectory, xxiii. 276; at, xxiii. 54, 56

...

Page 406

...Cook's "Voyages," xxv. 346

"Coolin," Skye terrier, xxiv. 201

Coquelin, xxiii. 276

...

Page 407

...character, xxv. 155, 189-90

"David Balfour" (title first given both to "Kidnapped" and "Catriona,"
...

Page 408

..."Die Judin" at Frankfurt, xxiii. 44

Disappointment, xxiii. 295

Dobell, Dr., xxiv. 201,...

Page 409

...Notes on," xxiii. 185, 211, 216, 218

_Edinburgh Review_, article in, on Rembrandt, by...

Page 410

...142

"Fables" (Lord Lytton), xxiii. 129

Fage, xxiii. 307

Fairchild, Blair, xxiv....

Page 411

...369 _et seq._, 386; xxv.
5, 41 _n._ 1, 117, 120, 122,...

Page 412

...in Samoa, xxiv. 370; xxv. 6 _et seq._, 176 _et passim_

Gevaudan, xxiii. 218

...

Page 413

... 402

Greenaway, Kate, xxiv. 32

Green, Madame, singer, xxv. 249

Grey,...

Page 414

...collaboration with,
xxiii. 185, 256, 257; xxiv. 99, 106, 119, 146;...

Page 415

...of Eld" Fables, xxiii. 12, 141

Houses, characteristics of, xxiii. 145, 146

Howard...

Page 416

...to, xxiii. 342

Ireland, plan for life in, xxiv. 108, 222

Irongray, tombs...

Page 417

..."John Silver" (Treasure Island), xxiv. 112, 123; genesis of, xxiv. 31

Johnson, --, an...

Page 418

...Knox, John, writings on, xxiii. 55, 61, 111, 141, 146, 147, 148, 149,
...

Page 419

...the North of Scotland to his Friend in
London" (Burt), xxiii. 291

...

Page 420

... "Lovelace" (Clarissa Harlowe), xxiii. 210

Love, young, advice on, xxiii. 358

Lowell,...

Page 421

...xxv. 407-8

Marat, xxiv. 183

Marbot, "Memoires" of, xxv. 274, 321

"Marche...

Page 422

... Engineers"), xxiv. 279

"Memories and Portraits," xxiii. 56, 318 _n._ 1; xxiv....

Page 423

...114, 127, 139, 140, 142

Morley, Charles, of the _Pall Mall Gazette_, xxiv. 125

...

Page 424

..."Noll and Nell," poem (Martin), xxiii. 210

"Norma," opera, xxiii. 252

"Northern Lights"...

Page 425

...99, 390, 445;
account by, of death of R. L. S., xxv....

Page 426

...Mrs. Joseph, xxiv. 149; letter to, xxiv. 149

Penn, William, article on, projected, xxiii....

Page 427

...xxiii. 229, 265, 266, 267, 278,
353; xxiv. 5, 23, 24, 34,...

Page 428

..."Restoration Dramatists," essay on (Lamb), xxiv. 85

Retrospective musings, xxv. 437-8

Revenge, Christian...

Page 429

...39, 98, 99 _et seq._;
xxv. 105, 131

Ruedi, Dr., xxiii....

Page 430

...George, writings of, xxiii. 87

Sandwich Islands, xxiv. 292, 340

"San Francisco," xxiii....

Page 431

...142, 143, 148, 398

Sellar, Mrs., xxiii. 115

"Sensations d'Italie" (Bourget), xxv. 127,...

Page 432

...xxiii. 57, 58, 61, 63, 66, 68, 71, 74, 77, 83, 86, 91,
...

Page 433

... 379; xxv. 397

Spain, xxiii. 119

_Spectator_, xxiii. 239, 264; xxv. 58

...

Page 434

...Sitwell, xxiv. 331, to J. A. Symonds, xxiv. 11

Stevenson, Mrs. Thomas (_nee_ Balfour),...

Page 435

...154, 170, 177, 199, 202, 238-9, 250, 255;
xxv. 309, 310, 341,...

Page 436

...Times_--building of the first Vailima house,
xxv. 3-8

...

Page 437

...(_see_ Appin murder)

Stewart, Miss (Bathgate), xxiii. 227

Stewart, Sir Herbert, xxiv. 81

...

Page 438

... _intro._ xxvi.; letter to, from Mrs. R. L. Stevenson, xxiv. 11;
...

Page 439

...161

"Time" (Milton), xxiii. 294

_Times, The_, letters to, on Samoan affairs, xxv....

Page 440

...Michael's Mounts," essay, projected, xxiii. 207

"Two Years before the Mast" (Dana), xxiv. 297

...

Page 441

... "Home no more home to me, where must I wander?" (Songs of...

Page 442

...126, 127, 135

Victoria, Queen, xxiii. 323

Villiers, Lady Margaret, xxv. 228, 236

...

Page 443

...S. J., missionary xxv. 174, 180, 202, 203; letter to,
xxv. 174

...

Page 444

...xxv. 57


Zassetsky, Madame, xxiii. 97, 99, 102, 105, 108, 110, 113, 114, 115,
...

Page 445

...36

Autumn Effect, An, xxii. 112


Back to the World, i. 120

...

Page 446

...Keswick, xxii. 80

College Magazine, A, ix. 36

College Memories, Some, ix. 19

...

Page 447

...269; The Sinking Ship, xxi.
272; The Two Matches, xxi. 274; The...

Page 448

...II. Foreign, xvii. 15; The
Sorrows of Laupepa, xvii. 27; Brandeis, xvii....

Page 449

...the upward and the downward slope," xiv. 233

"I heard the pulse of the...

Page 450

...Morals, xvi. 379

Legends, Edinburgh, i. 291

"Let Beauty awake in the morn...

Page 451

...Retrospect, xxii. 71;
Cockermouth and Keswick, xxii. 80; Roads, xxii. 90; Notes...

Page 452

...Graden Sea-wood, iv. 189; Tells of an Interview
between Northmour, Clara, and...

Page 453

...and Oise Canal: Canal Boats, i. 50

Sambre Canalised, On the: To Quartes, i....

Page 454

...Distance, xviii. 129; Fakarava:
An Atoll at Hand, xviii. 137; A House...

Page 455

... "The infinite shining heavens," xiv. 222

"The jolly English Yellowboy," xiv. 274

...

Page 456

...311


Umbrellas, The Philosophy of, xxii. 58

"Under the wide and starry sky,"...

Page 457

... "With half a heart I wander here," xiv. 94

Wreath, The, of Immortelles,...