The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 5

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

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... 139


DESBOROUGH'S ADVENTURE

THE BROWN BOX ...

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... 263

DR. LANYON'S NARRATIVE ...

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...setting forth upon his tragic enterprise, will not
forget Mr. Cole carrying the dynamite in his...

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...young men, each
puffing a select regalia, had soon taken their places on a sofa of
mouse-coloured...

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...was myself thrown unexpectedly upon the world, it was my fortune to
possess an art: I...

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...am
waiting for something to turn up."

"All in the same boat!" cried Somerset. "And have you,...

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...neighbourhood of the
Green Park. He was over six feet in height, with shoulders
disproportionately broad, close...

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...it his, follows it with craft and passion, and from
one trifling circumstance divines a world."

"Just...

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...on one of his digressions.
Fearing, apparently, that the somewhat eccentric views...

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...is not more silent than this city of sleep."

He was still following these quaint and...

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...a strip of gardens in the midst. Here
was quite a stir of birds; even at...

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...intervention.
His looks returned at last upon the suppliant. He remarked with
irritation that she was charming...

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...and directness.

"I thought," he said, in the tone of conversation, "that I had
indistinctly perceived you...

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...alone, besides, the spell that he had hitherto obeyed began
to weaken; he considered his behaviour...

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..."I am lost
indeed." And with a passionate gesture she turned and fled along the
street.

Challoner observed...

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...arm, her laughter sounded low and pleasant in his ears.
"Ah," she sighed, by way of...

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...dwell upon the features of that
ride: rock, cliff, and barren moor alternated; the streams were...

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...by propped against a rock. The girl did not seem to be conscious of
the act;...

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...in the
thick of this dreary hubbub, was seized with a desire to weep. A touch
upon...

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...the man, with a strange smile, "a Mormon missionary if you
will! I value not the...

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...the strange manner of their meeting; it
knew, at least, no bounds, either divine or human;...

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...was aware of my parents' tenderness and all the
harmless luxuries of my existence; and why...

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...and I, alone in a light waggon, came to that part of the road
which ran...

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...climbed to
the very topmost point of material prosperity, and I myself had reached
the age of...

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...we could see around us for ten miles; sure, if in any
quarter of this land...

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...load two mules with
provisions; two others were to carry my mother and myself; and, striking
through...

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...and it was with every
mark of diffidence that he had had himself announced as Mr....

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...to dissipate in that
dry air, or what furnace pour it forth so copiously, I was...

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...pale as death, and trembled like a reed; I gave her my
hand, and she kept...

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...left the
slatterns whom they call my wives to scratch and quarrel among
themselves; of me, they...

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...chimney once more vomited smoke; but the most
absolute silence reigned, and, but for the figure...

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...house, he left me to myself. Presently I heard the jar
of iron from the far...

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...incessant snapping
sounds with which they burned, I have since divined to be electric. At
the extreme...

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...in ordinary circumstances,
to become the fiftieth bride of some ignoble elder, or by particular
fortune, as...

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...too
often, for those services of which we spoke to-night; none in Utah could
carry them so...

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...any choice but death or a
Mormon marriage, I declare before Heaven I had embraced it.

"It...

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...the glow had faded out of the west, resumed our wanderings. About
noon we stopped again,...

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...and
bidding me to await faithfully the coming of his son. All then had been
arranged beforehand:...

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...this morning, I had
already ceased to struggle and ceased to hope.

The landlady, like every one...

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...by nature. My occupation ended, I fell a prey to the
most sickening impatience, mingled with...

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...you in every human gift but one: when that gift also has
been restored to me...

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...his own.
"Asenath," he said, "you owe me much already; with one finger I still
hold you...

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...if he failed? And oh, tenfold worse! what if
he succeeded? What detested and unnatural changeling...

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...reached my ears from the laboratory, I could no longer
control my impatience, but mounted the...

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...which, if you deny me your help, I shall find it
difficult indeed to free myself."

At...

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...of England notes. It took some time
to make the reckoning, for the notes were of...

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...some of the dignity of prophecy. Had he not promised Somerset to
break with the traditions...

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...young lady, with a sigh. "By the by, I
had forgotten--it is very childish, and I...

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...eagerness, would suffer no delay. In the
late, luminous, and lamp-starred dusk of the summer evening...

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...had conquered his alarms.
Challoner, at least, had scarce set foot upon the pavement when he...

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...two ladies;
and I must ask you, without further delay, to summon Miss Fonblanque,
into whose hands...

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...on the garden,
he clapped forth his head and shoulders and whistled long and shrill.
Challoner fell...

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...saw the strong retaining wall, some thirty feet in height, which
enclosed the garden to the...

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...obscure and mischievous imbroglio. Evil was certainly
afoot; evil, secrecy, terror, and falsehood were the conditions...

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...received,
embraced, and helped him; he was lifted and set once more upon the
earth; and with...

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...pay for this accoutrement. The man assured
him that the whole expense was easily met from...

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...any chance alighted on the Tyrolese hat or the degrading
ulster, his heart would overflow with...

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...but the interior was
obscure; the driver yawned behind his palm; and the young man was
already...

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...persons of no mind at all, he reasoned,
would be found more equal to the part;...

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...into a dining-room somewhat dimly lighted, but already
laid for supper, and occupied by a prodigious...

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...find it in your heart to make, and resolutely
determined to accept."

"You express yourself very well,"...

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...the force of his emotions, that he could find no
words in which to thank me;...

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...a week before, and fully determined to make
the best of the future.

All went well for...

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...find
that she detested her employers; and yet the terms in which she spoke of
them were...

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...less to carry them.

In this strait I did not hesitate a moment, but throwing on...

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...felt
sure I had confirmed his interest, and might venture, before I turned
the pass-key, to beseech...

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...a warning grimace, and there we
continued to stand, on the edge of the pavement, in...

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...drive
thenceforward in unbroken silence. When we arrived before the door of
our destination, the young gentleman...

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...best neighbourhoods
in town. I do not believe I am repulsive to the eye, and as...

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...tell her, from me, that I
forgive her cruelty, and though I will never more behold...

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...the life that I have
always preferred) to a Colonel Geraldine, a gentleman attached to Prince
Florizel...

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...had been a vision.

It was no vision, however; for, as I rose to my feet...

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...wait. From the same side of the square a second young man made
his appearance, walking...

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...the
chink. Creeping still closer, I put my eye to the aperture. The man sat
within upon...

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...the parts were found to be
reversed.

"I assure you," said the elder gentleman, "I not only...

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...coffee.

The unhappy young man rose from his seat. "I appeal to you," he cried,
"by every...

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...the salt."

"And possibly the mustard?" asked his highness, as he offered me the
contents of the...

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...you confront him at
such odds?"

He paused, as though staggered in his purpose. "And yet, madam,"...

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...of to-day,
to be base, cowardly, and dull; I saw him, in every age, combine to...

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...years go on: an oath, that was once the
very utterance of the truth of God,...

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...lived but to obey.

"The last charge that was laid upon me was the one which...

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...envy him, should be sunk beyond the reach of hope?

"Sir," resumed the prince, turning to...

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...one.
But the whole tale came home to me; and I was the better able to...

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...I have one idea clearly in my head, I do not care two straws
for any...

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...He might as well, he thought, avoid the
expense of lodging: the library fitted with an...

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...great a stake and to
do nothing, argued some defect of energy; and he at length...

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...Lamplough was genteel, Eno was omnipresent; Lamplough was trite,
Eno original and abominably vulgar; and here...

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...shall be the subject of
my first Academy picture."

The fate of neither of these works was...

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...on the artist of
the cartoons; and he began with shame to eat up his rosier...

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...Somerset, "I have myself,
unless it were to fetch beer, rarely gone abroad except in the...

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...of his mysterious lodger. The doors of the drawing-room flat were
never open; and although Somerset...

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...the next morning resumed the
practice of his art with careless hand and an abstracted mind....

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...and as soon as the full merit of the
works had flashed upon her, she gave...

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...instinct of the chase impelled him to severity. The bottle
had run low; the summer sun...

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...the contents of the black portmanteau? Stolen goods? the carcass of
one murdered? or--and at the...

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...She gazed upon the cartoons with sparkling eyes, and a
heightened colour, and, in a somewhat...

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...I got." Soon after, she began with tears to narrate the
deathbed dispositions and lament the...

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...his head. He donned the fur coat; and
standing before the mirror in an attitude suggestive...

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...flashed
into your mind to sell my flesh and blood, my anguish in the dock, and
the...

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...in your
directories; it is not a name current in post-offices or banks; and
indeed, like the...

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...the yell of fear and execration; and lo! a snap
like that of a child's pistol,...

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...whatever may confound or paralyse the activities of the
guilty nation, barrow or child, imperial Parliament...

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...and obviously correct
spellings as lamp-lightard, corn-dealard, apple-filchard (clearly
...

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...the enclosure, other men stood or
loitered, affecting an abstraction, feigning to gaze upon the shrubs,
feigning...

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...of life, for he
is not yet forty; with long years of happiness before him; and...

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...bag?"

The child cried aloud with joy and put out her hands to take it. She...

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...voice of friendship and love? How little do
we realise the sufferings of others! Even your...

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...and quiet than ordinary air, there slipped
into his mind the recollection of a certain entry...

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...how glad a heart! He thrust his
hand into his pocket. All was now over; he...

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...is
a sovereign; which I very willingly advance to you, on the single
condition that you shave...

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...him with the warmth of an old friend.

"Come in," he cried, "dear Mr. Somerset! Come...

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...cried Somerset, "do you understand my sentiments?"

"Certainly," replied Zero; "and I respect them! Would you...

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...he conversed with these guardians of
the law; how gladly had he wept upon their ample...

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...an individual,
now the address of some important centre, that rose, as if by accident,
upon his...

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...this coign of vantage, you shall perhaps
be startled by the detonation of the judgment gun--not...

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...of
the religious tract? I thought you were a good agnostic."

"Mr. Jones," said Somerset, "it is...

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...bondslave of honour. He who had accepted life from a point of
view as lofty as...

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...to
their sick brother at the window. Desborough's room was on the first
floor and fronted to...

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...apparition. Her face
was warm and rich in colour; in shape, it was that piquant triangle,...

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...haunted his soul. The
clouds had risen at her coming, and he beheld a new-created world....

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...Do
not seek to please me by copying the graces of my countrymen. Be
yourself: the frank,...

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...taken the liberty," said he, "of bringing you a little book. I
thought of you, when...

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...queenly and
accomplished; and seeing her more than the equal of her neighbours and
surrounded by the...

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...surprise had almost
changed into alarm, when, coming at last into a large verandahed court,
I found...

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...coming close about me, pleading and beseeching me to be
more wise; and when I insisted,...

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...father, with singular gravity of voice, "I must make
to-day a call upon your courage; much...

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...insolvent."

"What matters that?" I cried. "What matters poverty, if we be left
together with our love...

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...Cuba, and returns
from every trip with new and valuable gems?"

"He may have found a mine,"...

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...centuries of microscopical activity, each
one is, for you and me, a year of life, liberty,...

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...passed through the airy stretch of
the verandah; and came at length into the grateful twilight...

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...the
island, the plantation, and all its human chattels, to be now his own.
"I think," said...

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...what means, I know not; by
crime, if need be; and Heaven forgive both you and...

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...I am on my own place, I would have
you to know, and surrounded by my...

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...the qualities he valued in a
servant; and when he had questioned me further as to...

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...begged the doomed mortal to return upon his
steps. What were a few jewels in the...

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...girl?" he cried. "I bid you be silent and lead on."

Again I looked upon him,...

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...sweat, that made his face to shine, and in which the
greedy insects settled thickly.

"To sweat...

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...with a curious, puzzled, and pathetic look,
like a dull child at school, "if there be...

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...all inimical to life, contributing their parts. Yet in the
midst of this turmoil of sound,...

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...both men and women. Now they would raise
their palms half closed to Heaven, with a...

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...do not utter; power that is neither
good nor evil, but below them both; stronger than...

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...any
Eastern wind. Blackness engulfed the world: blackness, stabbed across
from every side by intricate and blinding...

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...ship was heaving on the surge, so trimly sparred, so glossily painted,
so elegant and _point-device_...

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...calling to know if they were mad, the
coloured seamen took him by the shoulders, dragged...

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...of the ship, I
knew her to be under way; my thoughts, so far from clarifying,...

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...was a sail in sight,
which was bound to pass us very close, and that Mr....

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...still kept looking back, I thought, with apprehension, he
brought me to a low house that...

Page 148

..."here they come!" And his black head was
instantly withdrawn from the window.

"I never heard such...

Page 149

...the whole episode of
my unfortunate marriage, why, I'll carry you home aboard the
_Nemorosa_."

I eagerly accepted...

Page 150

...In a week's time, the men
were all paid off; new hands were shipped; and the...

Page 151

...in my position--baronet, old family, and all that--cannot
possibly be too particular about the company he...

Page 152

..."Count upon
me," he added, with bewildered fervour; and, getting somehow or other
out of the apartment...

Page 153

...a friend might turn the balance in
her favour: how, then, if he should follow her?...

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...he was yet more dismayed by her
reply.

"That gentleman," said she, a smile struggling to her...

Page 155

...the pleasure of seeing the gentleman before.

"You have, sir," said Harry, somewhat abashed, but with...

Page 156

..."contains my jewels,
papers, and clothes; all, in a word, that still connects me with Cuba
and...

Page 157

...said, "Go now at once! My brain is in a whirl. I scarce know
what we...

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...to adopt the
name of Doolan; and, as he still studied the card, he was aware...

Page 159

...looked at him for a moment through her veil; took his hand suddenly
and sharply, but...

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...a dangerous and wicked girl. My name is Clara Luxmore. I was
never nearer Cuba than...

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...to the floor. Then followed a prolonged and strident
hissing as from the indignant pit; an...

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...I should
be haunted by quotations from works of an inexact and even fanciful
description; but here,"...

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...or
what have you done to yourself, that you should persist in this insane
behaviour? If not...

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...companion, the young man sped across the
square in the Oxford Street direction. They had not...

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...for me to
leave. My character is now reinstated; my fame brightens; this is the
best thing...

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...Square Atrocity; and without what is coarsely if vigorously
called stamps, you must be well aware...

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...honour with every penny
I possess. And I thank God, though there is nothing before me...

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...must not take a cigar," said Somerset.

"Indeed!" said Mr. Godall. "But now I come to...

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...of the
business; and the old man, let me inform you, besides being the most
egregious of...

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...air of one exceeding well content with life. He was
hailed by the two others with...

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...by day.
A light, refreshing odour of the most delicate tobacco hung upon the
air; and a...

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...you will feel the bite of that antithesis: possibly when you
kneel at night beside a...

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...was put upon my life by
those whom I attacked. I never called the policeman a...

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...scarce be found in
England."

"Dear me!" said the prince. "And you, madam, have an income of...

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...was eminently humorous. And at any rate," she added, nodding to
Paul, "he is a young...

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...known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of
time, they implied no aptness...

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...lifted up his cane and
pointed.

"Did you ever remark that door?" he asked; and when his...

Page 178

...and white
with the desire to kill him. I knew what was in his mind, just...

Page 179

...in the cheque
myself, and said I had every reason to believe it was a forgery....

Page 180

...a good rule of yours."

"Yes, I think it is," returned Enfield.

"But for all that," continued...

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...was taken away, he took up a candle and went into his
business-room. There he opened...

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...somewhat theatrical to the eye; but it reposed
on genuine feeling. For these two were old...

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...then of a child
running from the doctor's; and then these met, and that human Juggernaut
trod...

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...shadow. By ten
o'clock, when the shops were closed, the by-street was very solitary
and, in spite...

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..."Now I shall know you
again," said Mr. Utterson. "It may be useful."

"Yes," returned Mr. Hyde,...

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...second from the corner, was still
occupied entire; and at the door of this, which wore...

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...has forgotten and self-love
condoned the fault." And the lawyer, scared by the thought, brooded
awhile on...

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...the topic was distasteful; but
the doctor carried it off gaily. "My poor Utterson," said he,...

Page 189

...hope," continued the doctor, "there is one point I should like
you to understand. I have...

Page 190

...disposition, yet with something high too, as of a well-founded
self-content. Presently her eye wandered to...

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...lighted up with professional ambition. "This will make a
deal of noise," he said. "And perhaps...

Page 192

...man who was heir to a
quarter of a million sterling.

An ivory-faced and silvery-haired old woman...

Page 193

...last, however, was not so easy of accomplishment; for Mr. Hyde had
numbered few familiars--even the...

Page 194

...doctor, "I swear to God I will
never set eyes on him again. I bind my...

Page 195

...said Utterson. "He meant to murder you. You have had a fine
escape."

"I have had what...

Page 196

...could scarce have failed to hear of Mr. Hyde's
familiarity about the house; he might draw...

Page 197

...indeed, and all disreputable: tales came
out of the man's cruelty, at once so callous and...

Page 198

...was what
Utterson was tempted to suspect. "Yes," he thought; "he is a doctor, he
must know...

Page 199

...that
this earth contained a place for sufferings and terrors so unmanning;
and you can but do...

Page 200

...fearful. He went to call indeed; but he
was perhaps relieved to be denied admittance; perhaps,...

Page 201

...now; get your hat and take a
quick turn with us."

"You are very good," sighed the...

Page 202

...he had not once looked the lawyer in the face. Even now, he sat
with the...

Page 203

...the door."

The hall, when they entered it, was brightly lighted up; the fire was
built high;...

Page 204

...giving look
for look.

"Changed? Well, yes, I think so," said the butler. "Have I been twenty
years...

Page 205

...God's sake," he had added, "find me some
of the old."

"This is a strange note," said...

Page 206

...thing in the mask was
never Dr. Jekyll--God knows what it was, but it was never...

Page 207

...spine like ice. Oh, I know it's not evidence, Mr. Utterson;
I'm book-learned enough for that;...

Page 208

...nodded. "Once," he said. "Once I heard it weeping!"

"Weeping? how that?" said the lawyer, conscious...

Page 209

...hand and the strong smell of kernels that hung upon
the air, Utterson knew that he...

Page 210

...was drawn cosily
up, and the tea-things stood ready to the sitter's elbow, the very sugar
in...

Page 211

...it, sir?" asked Poole.

"Because I fear," replied the lawyer solemnly. "God grant I have no
cause...

Page 212

...have sacrificed my fortune or my left
hand to help you. Lanyon, my...

Page 213

...name, and to place in his hands the drawer that you will have brought
...

Page 214

...for a locksmith
and a carpenter. The tradesmen came while we were yet speaking; and we
moved...

Page 215

...loaded an old revolver that I might be
found in some posture of self-defence.

Twelve o'clock had...

Page 216

...and status in the world.

These observations, though they have taken so great a space to...

Page 217

...the crystals melted, to
brighten in colour, to effervesce audibly, and to throw off small fumes
of...

Page 218

...him with
his hands, like a man restored from death--there stood Henry Jekyll!

What he told me...

Page 219

...ill which divide and compound man's dual nature.
In this case, I was driven to reflect...

Page 220

...together--that in
the agonised womb of consciousness these polar twins should be
continuously struggling. How, then, were...

Page 221

...myself as if out of a great sickness. There was something
strange in my sensations, something...

Page 222

...I looked upon that ugly idol in the
glass, I was conscious of no repugnance, rather...

Page 223

...of my life was daily growing more unwelcome. It was on this
side that my new...

Page 224

...soul, and sent forth alone to do his good pleasure, was a being
inherently malign and...

Page 225

...the elements of this illusion, occasionally, even
as I did so, dropping back into a comfortable...

Page 226

...of
projecting had lately been much exercised and nourished; it had seemed
to me of late as...

Page 227

...with so vast a
majority of my fellows, that I chose the better part, and was...

Page 228

...begun to succeed, that I was suddenly, in
the top fit of my delirium, struck through...

Page 229

...the terrors of the
scaffold. Jekyll was now my city of refuge; let but Hyde peep...

Page 230

...was corded
and hairy. I was once more Edward Hyde. A moment before I had been...

Page 231

...composed his two
important letters, one to Lanyon and one to Poole; and that he might
receive...

Page 232

...to gain the shelter of my cabinet, before I was once again raging
and freezing with...

Page 233

...prevailed against him, and deposed him out of life. The hatred
of Hyde for Jekyll was...

Page 234

...throes of change take me in the act of
writing it, Hyde will tear it in...

Page 235

...period of
Mr. Soulis's ministry, to be avoided in the dusk hours by all who valued
themselves...

Page 236

...bit by bit, a pickle at a time; an' there were
folk even then that said...

Page 237

...to be servant
at the manse, the folk were fair mad wi' her an' him thegither;...

Page 238

...door like a leddy o' the land; an'
her screighin' and laughin' as was a scandal...

Page 239

...to
thun'er on the morn; but the morn cam', an' the morn's morning, an' it
was aye...

Page 240

...mair, gaun hap-step-an'-lowp ower Dule water to the manse.

Mr. Soulis wasna weel pleased that this...

Page 241

...was Janet washin' the cla'es wi' her coats kilted.
She had her back to the minister,...

Page 242

...feet--but it cam'
in upon him wi' a spate that there was some connection between thir...

Page 243

...the stairfoot. He couldna pray, he couldna think, he was dreepin' wi'
caul' swat, an' naething...

Page 244

...o' wund, like a cat's fuff; oot gaed the
can'le, the saughs skreighed like folk; and...