The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 7

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

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... TRAVELLER'SMANUSCRIPT ...

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... ...

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... 203

...

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... 344

...

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...those days the story of Braddock, and how, as he was carried
dying from the scene...

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...marched with the comparatively powerful kingdom of Seaboard
Bohemia, celebrated for its flowers and mountain bears,...

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...triumph
announced the slaughter of the quarry. The first and second huntsman had
drawn somewhat aside, and...

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...it."

"You have him on the brain," retorted his companion.--"There he goes!"
he cried, the next moment.

And...

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...A very tall, old, white-headed man
came, shading a candle, at the summons. He had been...

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...answered the Prince, weaving in a patch of truth, according
to the habit of all liars.

"Business...

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...farm than when I found it. So it
is, if a man works hearty in the...

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...the pity that it
should not be for ever. Well, sir, this Kuno was one day...

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...it's
some way through life for all that; and the mere fools and fiddlers are
beginning to...

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...very sad; it is a sad thing for
this poor, wicked girl to go down to...

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...gives himself out, sir, for what nowadays they
call a patriot: a man from East Prussia!"

"Give...

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...fortified his
spirits; and the Prince, breathing deep and pausing as he went, walked
in the wet...

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...father; for I
assure your Highness, if he had known who you was, he would have...

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...no,
not if I had it on my forehead. And that's what you must do, if...

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...his rock promontory; but his humour had in the meantime
changed. The sun now shone more...

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...hope she only sees a little farther on. My
grandfather and my father and I, we...

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...physic, and not come to like it in the end."

"If you will have the papers...

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...louder and more distinct with every step of their
advance. Presently, when they emerged upon the...

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...delivered from love of such a nature. For if
I, a stranger, had been one-tenth part...

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...glances, and devoutly wished the business at an
end. For some time Fritz walked by the...

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...an arsenal that you have bought the
farm?"

"We'll see about that," the Prince answered, laughing. "You...

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...At the same time he gave a
beery yaw in the saddle. It was clear his...

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...ribbon.
"Medal!" the man cried, wonderfully sobered. "I have no medal."

"Pardon me," said the Prince. "I...

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...have had a drop, but I had not been drinking," the man replied,
triumphing in a...

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...Dr. Gotthold?
But intellectual merit, alone of all distinctions, has its base in
nature."

"I have the gratification...

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...not, I can assure you," Otto said.

"Or rather," distinguished the licentiate, "not to-day. The time...

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...He fled the sounds. Hard by him on
his right a road struck towards the palace,...

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...the palace. The modern pillared front,
the ball-room, the great library, the princely apartments, the busy...

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...forty, flaxen-haired, with refined
features a little worn, and bright eyes somewhat faded. Early to bed...

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...his cousin squarely in the face. "In short," he asked, "not
manly?"

"Well," Gotthold hesitated, "not manly,...

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...a natural transition. If I
am so clearly unfitted for my post," the Prince asked: "if...

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...army, cannon--why, it's like a box of lead soldiers! And the
people sick at the folly...

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...care for me; I must not
intrude; I must preserve the foppery of my indifference. What...

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...dulness. I have asked you whether all was quiet; do me the
pleasure to reply."

"Perfectly--O, perfectly...

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...he said,
addressing the Chancellor.

But that gentleman visibly hesitated to obey. "Baron von Gondremark," he
said, "has...

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... OF A VISIT TO THE VARIOUS
COURTS...

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...moral nature, a
frivolity and inconsequence of purpose that mark the nearly perfect
fruit of a decadent...

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...tails. Which of the two extremes may be his
actual design he were a bold man...

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...and at each fresh stretch of authority
persuades them, with specious reasons, to postpone the hour...

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...although he has always heard
me with deference, I have been conscious throughout of a sort...

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...marriage vow and every shred of public decency, but that vice
of jealousy which is so...

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...was so called from an Italian doctor who had
imposed on the credulity of a former...

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...Sir John looked
on with a malign enjoyment; and Otto chafed, regretting, when too late,
the unnecessary...

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...time to the great orchestra of birds. Nor did
Otto pause till they had reached the...

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...sovereign."

"And it is this man, to whom you dare not offer satisfaction, that you
choose to...

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...speed you
to Vienna!"

"In the impetuosity of youth," replied Sir John, "your Highness has
overlooked one circumstance:...

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...so fitly--being beauty's slave?" said
Otto.--"Madame Grafinski, when is our next play? I have just heard...

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...despatch of ill-assured admirers. She met Otto
with the dart of tender gaiety.

"You have come to...

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...scandal, as I turn my phrase. I am the alchemist that makes the
transmutation. They have...

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...rebellion and a _cas pendable_; but what
am I to do? My bear is jealous!"

"Madam, enough!"...

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...to call deceit. His manners, as he smiled upon the
Princess, were over-fine, yet hardly elegant.

"Possibly,"...

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...It is as simple as a sum. There
can be no resistance."

"It is no great exploit,"...

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...very coal he had been
quenching--"none the less real in that it is not precisely military,...

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...from an encounter. The knight must not disgrace
his weapons."

"Then let me pray my _belle dame...

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...she touched a bell, and
gave the order to admit the Prince.




CHAPTER VI

THE PRINCE DELIVERS A...

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...to play the part of Princess on this little stage, did I not
immediately resign to...

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...him happy; virtue, they say, will do the like--I have not tried;
and they say also...

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...this you
have been driving!"

"I have tried to tell you how I feel," he replied. "I...

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...to visit me. Do you
understand?" she added, rising. "For my part, I have done."

"I will...

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...see
you, since you will have no advice of mine, apply the more attention of
your own...

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...from Gotthold, thus conceived:

"The council is privately summoned at once.

...

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...so; Gondremark, Eisenthal, and one of the
non-combatants followed suit; and the paper was then passed...

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...purposes."

Gondremark spurred up Grafinski underneath the table.

"If your Highness will indicate the destination ..." began...

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...Highness," said Gotthold, "is the ultimatum. It was in the
very article of signature, when your...

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...politic is seriously diseased; republicanism, socialism,
many disintegrating ideas are abroad; circle within circle, a really
formidable...

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...be enough to precipitate events. There lies the
danger. The revolution hangs imminent; we sit, at...

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...much
gusto--it is from no merit in yourself they are obeyed. What are you?
What have you...

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...confidence! I tried to imitate your
calm. And I was well inspired; in my heart, I...

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...Young and beautiful, you have lived a life of
high intellectual effort, of irksome intellectual patience...

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...power, madam? The power is in the army," he replied; and then
hastily, ere she could...

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...madam. I am a person of precaution."

"It would appear so," she said, with a flash...

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...has more memory than your servant," said the Baron; and
then he, in his turn, carefully...

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...all his carelessness, his
vanity was delicately tickled, and his mind returned and dwelt
approvingly over the...

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...mostly congregated, each
full-charged with scandal; and down at the farther end the gamblers
gambled. It was...

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...and hindrances of the proposed exploit.

"They refused you the money," she said when he had...

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...through the strong panoply of a previous love he had been conscious
of a shock. Next...

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...if a generous end. And the man whom he had reproved for
stealing corn he was...

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...an empty one, you might have relied on my
own foresight; and this one is very...

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...to comfort and compose her as
he could, and before many words, the money was accepted....

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...sudden convulsion
of his being. Both drew instantly apart, and for an appreciable time sat
tongue-tied. Otto...

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...am angry. By what right? By none!" he thought; but he was
still angry. He cursed...

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...may hold in store," he said, "but this day should be a bright
one in the...

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...negative, they flattered my
philosophy; and I called them almost virtues. Well, Otto, I was wrong;...

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...Otto. The soul is in her
eyes."

"You have changed your note for Seraphina, I perceive," said...

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...It will not be you; it never can be
you:--you, who can do nothing, as your...

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...aid in my
affairs," said Otto. "I have heard all that I desire, and you have
sufficiently...

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...easy canons of Mittwalden, the Countess swiftly
traversed, opened a little door with a key, mounted...

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...morning he will command a most romantic prospect from the donjon
of the Felsenburg. Farewell, Featherhead!...

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...lover in reserve. And I say, Anna," he added with severity,
"you must break yourself of...

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...said. "I wonder at
you. If your assurances are true, you can have no reason to...

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...hand advanced, then dropped. "Well," he said,
"since trust is what you call it...."

"No more," she...

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...brushing of so many footfalls, transposed it into
music.

What was she to do? She held the...

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...other woman in my place would not be prejudiced, and think
herself committed? But, thank Heaven!...

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...you take the thing down-heartedly? As well seek
wine in a milk-pail as love in that...

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...von Rosen," returned the Prince, flushing a
little darker, "there can be here no talk of...

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...born incapable of inspiring it," said Otto.

Madame von Rosen broke into sudden laughter. "Fool," she...

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...Princess."

"Well," said the Countess, "I have advised you to resist; at the same
time, if you...

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...quieted. His little
turgid life dwindled to its true proportions; and he saw himself (that
great flame-hearted...

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...arm, and the talk between this pair of conspirators ran
high and lively. The Countess, indeed,...

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...wear my heart upon my sleeve, excuse the
indecency! It is a very little one," she...

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...nature?
This is a man, child--a man who loves you. O, it will not happen twice!
it...

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...your freedoms. I am not"--and she looked for a moment
rather piteously upon the Countess--"I am...

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...the Countess, watching with some alarm
the white face of Seraphina. "It is in vain for...

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...corners of her
universe had fallen. She had never liked nor trusted Gondremark
completely; she had still...

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...who gave you his rights, and
of the married lover who made it...

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...to remark her beauties; but when he now beheld her standing
illuminated by her passion, new...

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...cried. "Absurd and odious! What would the Countess say?"

That great Baron Gondremark, the excellent politician,...

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...Scandal was at the door, with
what a fatal following she dreaded to conceive; and at...

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...toilette!"

"Take up that flounce," she said; "the man may die."

Greisengesang turned in a flutter to...

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...face upon the pane, she could
see the terrace, where the lights contended; thence, the avenue...

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...sleeve. "Bid the Princess flee. All is lost," he whispered. And the
next moment he was...

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...glory
of the great night laid hold upon her; her eyes shone with stars; she
dipped her...

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...notable
blackness, a dim shine, relieved, only to exaggerate, the solid
oppression of the night and silence....

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...coming down to her in a
series of cascades; and now approached the margin, where it...

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...certain hill-top, and saw far before her the
silent inflooding of the day. Out of the...

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...forest paths. She had lost
sight of the pilot smoke, which blew another way, and conducted...

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...after another;
but a brave woman far more readily accepts a change of circumstances
than the bravest...

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...novel, they touched so strangely home, they were
so hued and scented, they were so beset...

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...creature loved her; none but
Otto; and would even he forgive? If she began weeping in...

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...he had looked upon a statue, he made a grudging
inventory of her charms: the figure...

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...believe, the benefit of being formed in your employment--a
footman,--am I right?--and our old friend the...

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...and head in air.
To Sir John, however, after what he had said, and as her...

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...a long pause, during which the carriage rolled by rock and
woodland.

"And now," she resumed, with...

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...as the road wound out and in
about the bluffs and gullies of the mountain, saw...

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...all three took their wine very pleasantly; and even as they
did so, the carriage with...

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...like satire. Is this a time, do
you think, when I can wish to hear myself...

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...the other day,
how much of my warmth was in the cause of virtue? how much...

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...did you not
resist? I was told you came of your free will; but should you...

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...I would try," returned the Governor, and he offered her
his arm.

She took it, picked up...

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...all too quickly till you leave. But I
must ask you for the news. I have...

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...times I can take pleasure in the
comedy. But not to-day: to-day you will be the...

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...I am
left lamenting. The Doctor still remains to me: _probus_, _doctus_,
_lepidus_, _jucundus_: a man of...

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...Rosen, along that mountain wall, her servant
following with both the horses, and all about them...

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...the
bluffs of the mountain wall, she fled, loose-reined, and still the groom
toiled in her pursuit.

"A...

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...time for thought, and see the world so changed. I have
been blind, stone-blind; I have...

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...below where they stood, a good-sized brook passed below the
road, which overleapt it in a...

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...running away," replied Otto, "straight for the
frontier."

"Leaving Gruenewald?" cried the man. "Your father's son? It's...

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...dingles are both deep and thorny."

"Lead on," she said. "Are you not Otto the Hunter?"

They...

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...let us reverse the parts!" said Otto. "It is ourselves we
cannot forgive, when we deny...

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...him, indeed,
to be the centrepiece and cloud-compeller of the whole. But, with due
allowance for this...

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...Victor Hugo's
trumpet-blasts of patriot enumeration; and I came latterly, when I
supposed my task already ended,...

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...I scorn to appear vainglorious.
Tonti is dead, and I never saw anyone who even pretended...

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...was in his seventy-third year; he had long
complained of the effects of age, had long...

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...building himself up a reputation among the more
cultivated portion of the ignorant, his domestic life...

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...Morris Finsbury threatened his
uncle with all the terrors of the law, and was only prevented...

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...no pains in nursing the security.
The old man was seen monthly by a physician, whether...

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...the authority of my Lord Tennyson, is half-sister to Delay;
but the Business Habits are certainly...

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...do, my dear, you mustn't excite yourself," said Julia;
"for you know, if you look at...

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...his return. What was worse, Masterman had refused to attend
the lecture on "Education: Its Aims,...

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...at him benignly. "You may believe one thing," said he.
"Whatever else I do, I am...

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...walked in Branksome Woods, and by night, as he turned upon his
bed, and at meal-times,...

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...has
probably called you back, even after you have paid your fee, to add with
stentorian emphasis:...

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...in a body; finding their entertainer
somewhat dry, they had taken the question of amusement into...

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...is unique.
We have all seen them entering the table d'hote (at Spezzia, or Graetz,
or Venice)...

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...point ran in a sharp curve about a wooded hillock; all of
the near side was...

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...and fro the brothers hurried, staring in the faces of the wounded, or
turning the dead...

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...mean to do?" whispered John.

"Bury him, to be sure!" responded Morris, and he opened his...

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...father is to live for
ever, by God, so shall my uncle!"

"It's illegal, ain't it?" said...

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...cart that
we could drive ourselves--and take the box, or whatever we get, to
Ringwood or Lyndhurst...

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...residence."

"And then," pursued Morris, "there's no water. How do you get your
water?"

"We fill _that_ from...

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...we could never conceal
the absence of the old man."

John's jaw dropped.

"O, come!" he cried. "You...

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...slant of wind,
tingled on the window-panes. At intervals, when the gloom deepened
toward despair, Morris would...

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...certainly a gentleman whom I esteem; but he was scarce a model
nephew. As for John,...

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...the neighbouring high
road, where a _char-a-banc_ was bowling by with some belated tourists.
The sound cheered...

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...have seen a deal, sir," remarked the carrier, touching up his
horse; "I wish I could...

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...an essay that I once read before an appreciative audience----"

"It ain't string," said the carrier...

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...no right to address me in
such terms. Here's a shilling for your trouble; and, if...

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...that some of these gentlemen are looking with curiosity in my
direction; and certainly it is...

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...and nine pence halfpenny appeared to be the total of the old
gentleman's available assets. He...

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...how to pay his fare.

Joseph's nails were never clean; he ate almost entirely with his...

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...populous lecture-halls and endless oratory.
His body, in the meanwhile, lay doubled on the cushions, the...

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...one
of the ornaments of Bloomsbury, and has a collection of some
kind--birds' eggs or something that's...

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...the Wallachian Hospodar were liquid lead and
wedges in the hand of Destiny.

Smitten with the desire...

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...consequent regret was tempered with
hope. Among those whom she had thus met a year before...

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...ready to give way. In fact, he would go as far as
he could to meet...

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...fifteen
pairs of wavering legs--scraped, loudly grinding, through the
doorway--and was deposited at length, with a formidable...

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...became her so
prettily that Gideon forgot to turn away his eyes, and, swinging the
hammer with...

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...Stay and have tea with me."

"If I thought you really wished me to stay," said...

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...haven't a guess," said Gideon. "Specimens are usually bits of stone,
but rather smaller than our...

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...his head. "What is that?" he screamed.
"What is that waxwork? Speak, you fool! What is...

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...sent out, however, if it were already in the
hands of some wrong person, matters looked...

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...know,' sez I, 'but I
rather fancy that there barrel bears that name.' The little man...

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...its consequences. Quietly at first,
and then with growing heat, he reviewed the advantages of backing...

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... _Bad._ ...

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...if Pitman gives the
business and the rest of...

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... to be the case.

6. I have left the...

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... 11.
and I have none...

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...to do but find a venal doctor; and that ought
to be simple enough in a...

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...was, indeed, no more ambitious a
task for De Lesseps, with all his men and horses,...

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...bread in the house, for Miss Hazeltine (like all women left
to themselves) had subsisted entirely...

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...to transact business, and
with as much indifference as he could assume, Morris presented the
forged cheque...

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...assistance, and I fear that my holding the pen for him may have
made the difference...

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...he
would have been less alarmed, perhaps more mortified.

"That was a curious affair, Mr. Bell," said...

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...without noticeable
consequence, and two or three statues after the antique, representing
satyrs and nymphs in the...

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...and simply tied; the whole outward man, except for a pointed beard,
tentatively clerical. There was...

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...to look round--to the door in the lane,
you will please tell him; I shall be...

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...kettle, a bottle of gin, a lemon, and glasses.


Michael mixed himself a grog, and offered...

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...may be a romantic visit from one of the young ladies--a sort
of Cleopatra business. Have...

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...to be
quite plain with you, Pitman, I don't like your friend's appearance."
And with that the...

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...to pull you through. Do you hear
that?--I mean to pull you through. Let me see:...

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...mine--I call him my friend
for brevity; he is now, I understand, in Demerara and (most...

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...in the height of fashion, with a certain
mercantile brilliancy best described perhaps as stylish; nor...

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..."You'll look perfectly beastly.
Here are spats, too," he continued, drawing forth a pair of those
offensive...

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...he added, as he filled out a glass
for each. "Now you will give me news...

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...that would require an umbrella. Walk of a
purser's mate. Walk of an Australian colonist revisiting...

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...represented.

It would be difficult to express what Pitman suffered in the cab: cold,
wet, terror in...

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...began to bring in lunch.

Michael made an excellent meal, which he washed down with a...

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...in a hansom, he took heart of grace.

"Don't you think," he faltered, "it would be...

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...Anything to oblige a friend."

A glimpse of the ostler's darkening countenance decided Pitman. "All
right," he...

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...and the whole affair can be put on
a more regular footing to-morrow," replied Michael, taking...

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...with emotion."

The barrister looked at Mr. Thomas and was agreeably prepossessed by his
open although nervous...

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...them."

"That is a painful circumstance," said Gideon; he glanced pityingly in
the direction of the culprit,...

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...paused, tore up the paper, and put the pieces in his pocket. "I
will dictate," he...

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...of the piano,
and we must contrive that he shall find it. Let me see." And...

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...accession to wealth, neglect of
business, and election to the club, these little festivals have become
common....

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...man!" was the reply. "But ye'll not be the first that's asked me
that the day."

"No?"...

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...half a dozen of the chronically unemployed, a
gentleman (in one corner) trying to sell aesthetic...

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...nephew.

"There is something in that," returned Joseph. "And I believe I can
trust you. I believe...

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...short allowance of pencils,
when I wished to make notes of the most absorbing interest; the...

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...possible," cried Joseph; "the law cannot be so unjust as
that?"

"And the cream of the thing,"...

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...to save you from Dartmoor?"

His earnestness staggered the old man. "I must turn my attention...

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...nobody can see him."

"I'll tell you what, then," said Michael. "I'll make a clean breast...

Page 227

...But two glasses of the still
champagne produced a rapid change in Michael.

"There's a want of...

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..."Exc'lent
thing promote healthy action of the skin. Well, it's all one, anyway.
Give my love to...

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...Besant, on their
task of secret spoliation--certain it is, at least, that the old
editions pass, giving...

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...with the years!"

The intelligent reader will perceive the ravages of Miss Hazeltine.
Gideon had carried Julia...

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...thoroughly prompt, manly,
and business-like step? thought Gideon; and he answered himself at once:
"A telegram, very...

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...and man it was impossible
that it should be--there the thing impudently stood. Gideon threw open
the...

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...reader
is always a man of such vastly greater ingenuity than the writer. In the
eyes of...

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...in his pocket; and set
forth in quest of coffee. As he went, his mind trudged...

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...necessary consequence) was simply not
to be thought of. His uncle and the houseboat here occurred...

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...with such impatience, you know."

And, sure enough, about the hour of noon on the following...

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... _Op. 17._
J. B. JIMSON.
...

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...The second,
however, was conclusive: it was not in the least like Mr. Bloomfield to
display a...

Page 239

...it be about?" And Gideon heard her pretty laughter flow
abroad. "We must try to get...

Page 240

...exercise.

Thus, then, were these two young persons occupied--Gideon attacking the
perfect number with resolution; Julia vigorously...

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...he is as good-looking as Mr. Forsyth. Mrs. Jimson--I don't
believe it sounds as nice as...

Page 242

...to a superficial eye my conduct may appear
unconventional."

"If you are not mad, it was no...

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...of it. When you know all the circumstances you will be able to
excuse me."

And sitting...

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...cut the silliest figure; and yet I mean to win you,
Julia. Look at me, if...

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...a Radical club) he had cleared out the
hall of his opponents, things had gone even...

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...painful for the party. And, at any rate, it's
dinner-time."

"What?" cried Gideon, plunging for his watch....

Page 247

...tell her why, for it was
simply a craven fear of being drawn himself into the...

Page 248

...than that of his daily occupations, his looks dwelling on the
skies, devoted himself wholly to...

Page 249

...began when I was
a boy, you see, before my taste was formed. When you're my...

Page 250

...that drinking was one thing and a friendly glass another.

In the Blue Lion, which was...

Page 251

...their notice, three persons, a
lady and two gentlemen, were deliberately drawing near. The sergeant put
his...

Page 252

...him, or something."

"Well, suppose we did, for the fun of the thing," said Gideon.

The fun...

Page 253

...down with Jimson. Shake
hands with me, Uncle Ned--Julia, darling girl, Julia, I----"

"Gideon, Gideon!" said his...

Page 254

...repulsive,
morality; and if it should prove the means of preventing any respectable
and inexperienced gentleman from...

Page 255

...his interview with
Michael, the idea wore a less attractive countenance. Was Michael the
man to be...

Page 256

...began to be
applied to every joint of his behaviour, two questions could not fail to
be...

Page 257

...hard lines, I daresay; but does he think I'm living on hot muffins?
One comfort," was...

Page 258

...complaining--and in short----"

"It has never been our habit, Rodgerson," said Morris, turning pale.
"But give me...

Page 259

...Michael was too much for Morris. He struck his
colours. A cheque at two months was...

Page 260

...clearness came. "It may be a defect in my intelligence," he
cried, rising to his feet,...

Page 261

...in his blood. "I will not!" he cried; "nothing shall induce me
to massacre my collection--rather...

Page 262

...to estimate the
part played by such enormous and miscellaneous repositories in the
education of the people....

Page 263

...lay before you
the results."

"Fire away," said Michael; "but please, Pitman, remember it's Sunday,
and let's have...

Page 264

...he knows your address; not the person who got the box, for
he doesn't know your...

Page 265

...hope--perhaps you might be induced
to--to make one of us," faltered Pitman.

"Disguise myself on Sunday?" cried...

Page 266

...you as
it does me; but the place seems deserted and silent, Mr. Finsbury, and
filled with...

Page 267

...the barrel;
your guilty secret is already known to him, as well as to your Maker...

Page 268

...killed in that vile accident."

Suddenly Michael was seized by mirth so prolonged and excessive that...

Page 269

...eight hundred pound--I'll have that and go to Swan
River--that's mine, anyway, and your friend must...

Page 270

...creature in the low-necked shirt followed his
example with a bird-like screech, and the stranger (finding...

Page 271

...entertainment, Morris would have instantly resigned all further
claim on its rewards and pleasures, and, with...

Page 272

...if it's not possible, Johnny?" pleaded the other.

"You nincompoop!" cried Vance. "Ain't we house-holders? Don't...

Page 273

...see you beg. It's not so easy as
you might suppose. I played it on being...

Page 274

...you don't, my buck, and I
don't mean you to,' says I, smiling away like a...

Page 275

...done. "But I know one thing: I'm not going to be humbugged out of my
property."

"I...

Page 276

...was not so much as shaken in the accident;
a man of your humane disposition ought...

Page 277

...times I have been ill advised. But it's the pathos of my
situation; that's what I...

Page 278

...know his hours. Here we are then; we're not pretty to
look at: what do you...