The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 20

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

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... 42

VI. THE ESCAPE...

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...ROWLEY'S VISCOUNT 154

...

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... XXIX. EVENTS OF TUESDAY: THE TOILS CLOSING ...

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...accident, very ignorant, plain fellows. My English, which had
brought me into that scrape, now helped...

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...to suppose--their own vicarious
triumph. Some moved among us with a decency of shame or sympathy....

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...France. In
the second, I had never wholly forgot the emotions with which I first
found myself...

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...wore the coarse but
honourable coat of a soldier; and remembered further back how many of
the...

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...the ends of her shawl fluttered about
her ear and were caught in again with an...

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...she came
to be so frequent. Her aunt was one of those terrible British old maids
of...

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...and how trivial her sex! A man might be an angel
or an Apollo, and a...

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...sweetheart.
Do you know what made him take me for a confidant?"

She parted her lips with...

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...there; let the hours do their office--let
time continue to draw me ever in more lively,...

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...her heart.

This done, there was nothing left for me but to wait and to hope....

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...handkerchief, and I was quick to remark
and cherish it."

"It is very, very beautiful," said she,...

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...discipline, and had risen
by an extreme heroism of bravery to a grade for which he...

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...word, or
I shall know you are a coward; the eyes of our guards are upon...

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...that none of us will fall so low. As a Frenchman
and a soldier, I owe...

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...almost gigantic, and proportionately strong.
In the inky blackness of the shed it was impossible to...

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...two expatriated Frenchmen
engaged in an ill-regulated combat like the battles of beasts. Here was
he, who...

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...no time was lost in getting
the man's deposition. He gave but the one account of...

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...inspired us.

I came off in public, as I have said, with flying colours; the sittings
of...

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...looked at
me with clear, severe eyes.

"I think we must have a little talk," said he.

"I...

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...the same placid and good-natured voice: "The court and I were
at one in setting aside...

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...duel might be very irregular in form, and,
under the peculiar circumstances of the case, loyal...

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...say: I give you my
parole, as a gentleman and a soldier, there has nothing taken...

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...voices of
hawkers came up clear and far away. Hard by, on a little bed, lay
Goguelat....

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...asked him if it was true.

"Yes," he said, "the fellow's gone."

"Did he suffer much?" I...

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...find myself the object of
marked consideration by a civilian and a stranger. This was a...

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...poor Vicary?"

"For more than a year," said I; "and shared his hiding-place for many
months."

"And I...

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...career;
with what purpose I leave you to judge. When he first brought the news
of your--that...

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...had been so long suspecting. There was no
dubiety permitted. M. Alain's expensive way of life,...

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...high, and it is very steep; a man might come by a devil of
a fall...

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...call yourself his brother?"

"It might be done," said I. "But look here a moment. You...

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...lawyer was scarce gone before I remembered many omissions; and chief
among these, that I had...

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...the embrasure to follow them
as long as possible. To think that such emotions, that such...

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...court to him and engaged his interest. He was prodigiously
embarrassed, not having previously addressed me...

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...caution, and he took himself away: leaving me in a
mixture of contrarious feelings, part ashamed...

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...as to lend me books, get me tobacco if I used it, and the
like. This...

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...glad. We, too, can see the Castle
from a corner in the garden, and we go...

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...her name?" he asked.

"Now, really," said I. "Do you think it likely she has told...

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...should hear, and those that we
dropped we could not hear ourselves. We had never a...

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...the tallest ship's
mast, the rope entirely free; and he as good as defied the boldest...

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...the pleasure in the world. But, first of all,
there is a hound here to be...

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...groping dark. We made haste to lie down. Had our gaolers been
upon the watch they...

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...would have stopped; and a moment after I was
demeaning myself in mid-air like a drunken...

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...to say, I got it; a
veil was torn from my mind, and I saw what...

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...than the first. I am not strong enough to
keep this rope extended. If I do...

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...at the very moment leaning upon the
battlements to listen?

The round, however, went by, and nothing...

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...something falling, and that
again by the report of a musket from the Castle battlements. It...

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...the watchman's lantern entering by the
other. I was now safe on a dark country highway,...

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...the spires and chimneys of the upper town, took gradual shape,
and arose, like islands, out...

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...loss of time.
No doubt the holly thickets would have proved a very suitable retreat,
but there...

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...of my neighbours should raise his eyes and give the signal for
my capture.

The part of...

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...she.

"If you call this escape," I replied.

"But you cannot possibly stop there!" she cried.

"I know...

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...you think right."

"Ah, yes!" he cried: "if I knew!"

"You see," said I, "it would be...

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...the moment, and looked each other
in the eyes. Soon after the Major was wounded, taken...

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...milk? for I must be taking the others to my aunt--that
is my excuse for being...

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...you be wanting?" said she.

"The clothes of a gentleman," said I. "Right or wrong, I...

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...supporting it," she said.

"And do you not understand, my fair foe," said I, "that even...

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...cottage. There I found soap,
water, razors--offered me diffidently by my beardless host--and an
outfit of new...

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...all of which I had need,
because it was necessary that I should support at the...

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...never seen consternation painted
in more lively colours than on the faces of my hosts. It...

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...no better repartee than a profound and I trust graceful
reverence.

"French prisoners are very well in...

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...port wine than my father, God rest him!" She settled herself
in a chair with an...

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...by skreigh
of day--and in my opinion you had best be travelling with the stots,"
said she.

"For...

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...a moment, down comes upon the scene
that apocalyptic figure with the nightcap and the horse-pistol,...

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...word) for debt."

"I pray God you have the expression incorrectly, ma'am," said I. "I do
not...

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...suppose you desire to be considered a
gentleman?"

"Can you doubt it, madam?" said I.

"I doubt very...

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...sixpence. Some charge a shilling, I
believe, but I have given you the benefit of the...

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...the lowest of which
I was aware of a drove of shaggy cattle, and a man...

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...this
point of vantage Sim came to a halt, took off his hat, and mopped his
brow.

"Weel,"...

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...the practice of letters and the investigations of science),
it gave me a singular view of...

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...say I am very well entertained."

"I envy you," said he. "I have jogged many miles...

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...All day
Sim and Candlish, with a more than ordinary expenditure both of snuff
and of words,...

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...throat, and he went down like a nine-pin and
moved no more.

It seemed this was the...

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...seen o' them that was the tither;
but the wale of a gentleman like you I...

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...rather claim kinship with the dogs than with the men! My
sympathy was unreturned; in their...

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...I went down the hill these last words of my friend
the drover echoed not unfruitfully...

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...t'other bottle, like the noisy and
free-hearted young gentleman I was. It was my policy (if...

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...his arms!" and, "Soult, poor devil! and
may he catch it again to the same tune!"

Never...

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...of viewing the cathedral; and the little man was silently at
my heels. A few doors...

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...race, the
pioneers of the glorious principles of liberty and brotherhood. Hush!
No, it is all right....

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...an enviable situation, whether for warmth or the pleasure of
society; and I was about to...

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...of
courtesies, but doubtless it would be impossible to wink at so gross a
fault, or rather...

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...became aware of a
grave dug in the midst of the thoroughfare, and a provision of...

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...in Scotland, and
received the encouragement of her sympathy, mingled and connected with a
fair amount of...

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...the name of Mr. Burchell Fenn came to the top in my
memory. This was the...

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...of wet clothes, in which particular I am as dainty
as a cat. At the corner...

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...and, my conscience not being entirely clear, I was more
accustomed to be uneasy myself than...

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...locked now," said I, trying the
door. "_A propos_, what have you for a cargo? It...

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...fine style of
architecture, and presenting a front of many windows to a lawn and
garden. Behind,...

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...when the prisoner again began to sneeze from
the body of the cart; and at the...

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...came near to
overpower me, and in which the pistol happily exploded, and I felt his
grasp...

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...In
short, I should have washed my hands of him on the spot, but for the
temptation...

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...shall think
it quite unnecessary to dwell on any of these passing circumstances in
my report to...

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...was "a sight of
cold, wet land as you come along the 'igh-road"; how the winds...

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...a continual stream of bluster, complaint, and barrack-room
oaths.

Fenn showed me in with the brief form...

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...Major--for that was
his rank--was the image of a flunkey in good luck. Even to be...

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...a parole against life and death and love? I ask your pardon;
this gentleman's also. As...

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...of gaiety in
the room that did the heart good.

I poured out some of the brandy.

"Colonel,"...

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...mouthful, and, before he had swallowed it,
would have forgotten his dinner, his company, the place...

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...Fenn, who could not
be more false--though he might be more vindictive--than I fancied him.
I looked...

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...for drunken men, that holds the reins for them and
presides over their troubles; doubtless he...

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...courtyard. Careful was the word
all night, and it was an alleviation of our miseries that...

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...heard very far off,
over the silent country that surrounded us, the guard's horn wailing
its signal...

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...with our feet to the fire. In the
meanwhile, King was gone with the cart, I...

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...from a lethargy, and told us again,
as though we had never heard it, the story...

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...to me that he had found these friends in
captivity: that he had started on this...

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...there are
some things that fall so bitterly ill on this side Time! As for the
Major,...

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...said the attorney's clerk to me.

"The same to you, sir," said I.

"I think this one...

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...all these months, and for once that I failed, it is not to
be supposed that...

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...I replied I
should go when and where I pleased; that we were lawful travellers in
the...

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...through and through you. You would
change the venue, would you?"

"I may be transparent, sir," says...

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...following his usual policy of obliging everybody, offered
no opposition to my design. The position of...

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...silent; and we may thus have covered half a mile before
the lane, taking a sudden...

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...not a
coward, as you may have supposed. Perhaps it will simplify our relations
if I tell...

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...flung my stick on the road.

"Romaine?" I cried. "Daniel Romaine? An old hunks with a...

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...whole duty of man in a quatrain! And remark,
I do not set up to be...

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...a wager.
Where can we find a good inn? And remark that I say _good_, for...

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...you shall be, Dudgeon," said I. "You shall not only be drinking,
you old hypocrite, but...

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...glad of it," said I, passing the bottle, "because that is
about all I can tell...

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...Dunstable.
The mere mention of the name Amersham Place made every one supple and
smiling. It was...

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...nobility and gentry; nor anything
at all to equal the servility of the population that dwells...

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...had been long prepared for me, and I should be expected to dine in
about an...

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...his first trial as a master. Cheered by
which consideration, I demanded my bath in a...

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...I told myself I would have died for _them_, how much greater and
handsomer than life...

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...on all his life. All right enough, no doubt; but what I do
say is that...

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...mirror like one who should
dance the minuet, "when the result is so successful as this,...

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...sent for
you, and I thank you for the obliging expedition you have shown. It is
my...

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...cherished one, the last comfort, of these dying
women. I have been in pitched fights, my...

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...a very holy one," said my uncle civilly.

"And a very holy one, as you observe,"...

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...to repay if I were to insult him on his deathbed.

"Your will, monsieur, must ever...

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...that did my heart good.
Indeed, I had never a much greater need of human sympathy,...

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...same exaggerated seriousness as I gave it to
him.

"Now," said I. "Here is the key for...

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...French prisoner, Champdivers, might
be in a perpetual danger of arrest; but the rich travelling Englishman,
St....

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...certain that they have
found a watery grave."

At the reading of this paragraph...

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...fire-eating manners against your own attorney?
There are serious hours in life, Mr. Anne," he said...

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...is an ugly affair, a
fishy business. It is highly disagreeable. I would give my hand...

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...him a dangerous kind," answered the lawyer. "For you,
these are the lights on a lee...

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...Here he is."

We stood listening, with a strange anxiety, to the various noises that
awoke in...

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...to-morrow, if he go even then. Tell him there are a hundred
things to be done...

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...Baffled in
this, has he stayed himself, or has he planted Dawson here by way of
sentinel?"

"Himself,...

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...The leg and
the ankle were turned to a miracle. It is out of the question...

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...that I have given any," replied Romaine;
"certainly none that did not fall in the sphere...

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...and reap public mortification."

"Ah, but there you make the common mistake, Mr. Romaine!" returned
Alain. "You...

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...than decent
that he should have been brought up in the expectation of this great
inheritance, and...

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...the house, from the doctor
and the priest to Mr. Dawson and the housekeeper, from Dawson...

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...and addressed the man who had just condemned him to
ruin.

"My lord," said he, "you are...

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...Fontaine;
and then, opening a pale-blue eye full on Alain, he delivered with some
emphasis:

"La...

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...himself from the outrage of my touch.

"Hands off!" he somehow managed to articulate.

"You will now,...

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...whenever I myself was inclined to be upon
my good behaviour, some friends of mine should...

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...cast down?"

"It is true," said he: "I am. I am cast down. I am literally...

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...sheet is the Viscount's usual
reading. It is my conviction he had it in his pocket."

"I...

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...own myself an idiot. Well do they say, _An old
soldier, an old innocent!_ For I...

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...cried the lawyer. "Ay,
certainly, a great deal in that. All the witnesses drowned but one,...

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...it? To every disguise, however good and
safe, there is always the weak point; you must...

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..."I have to dress for a
smartish servant and a Russia leather despatch-box." That brought me...

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...we can part," I answered.

"I give you the whole night," said he. "So long as...

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...In this preoccupation I believe he took leave
of me without observing it; our things were...

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...never let this innocent
involve himself in the perils and difficulties that beset my course,
without some...

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...safety, and not only told him the story of Goguelat, but threw
in the business of...

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...be sure the despatch-box was not
forgotten. Who was to pick it up, who was to...

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...the doors of the inn. At these evidences of so
much travel on the road I...

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...'alf after
eight. What time do you want her at the door?"

"Horses and all?" said I.

"'Osses...

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...again. I recognised, with heartfelt gratitude, how lucky I
had been to go in by the...

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...length and breadth of England, in the shape of the
claret-coloured chaise! That elegant equipage (which...

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...Breasts?" I repeated, for I stupidly did not understand at the
moment an expression I had...

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...to appearances;
doubtless, in a hired chaise, we should have had more freedom, but look
at the...

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...can
look at horses, and I can look at trees too, although not fond of it.
But...

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...one of his diversions, and to which I owed many intervals of peace.
When he first...

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...defend the right!"

So I spoke at the moment; but for all my brave airs, the...

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...a plaid, each armed with a rude staff; and I was immediately
bowed down to have...

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...the idea of teaching him French; and
accordingly, from Lichfield, I became the distracted master, and...

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...that I was, at the same
time, approaching a place of some fame in Britain--Gretna Green....

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...a half-bred hawbuck; and she
was already not only regretting it, but expressing her regret with...

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...with an
ill grace.

I gave her my hand; she mounted like a bird into the chaise;...

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...with you,
none--a perfect confidence."

"Madam," said I, "a gentleman."

"That's what I mean--a gentleman," she exclaimed. "And...

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...Bellamy occasionally posturing at the window and
obliging us with some of his conversation. He was...

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...that he carried a drawn pistol in his hand. I turned at once to the
poor...

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...had suffered worse in
the encounter; but I was too wise to risk the anti-climax. That...

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...to be off at once. Bidding my own post-boy and Rowley
be in readiness for an...

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...'em, Mr. Anne?" said the rascal.

"That is a senseless question; it can make no difference...

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...that with the niceties and
civilities of drill. We would pass through the little crowd before...

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...a blank, blank, blanketing blank!"

The fellow's language had become too powerful for reproduction, and I
passed...

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...as good as ruined, is that chaise. General rule, people
don't like chaises with bullet-holes."

"Too much...

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...he broke out,
perceiving me to make a movement. "Both hands upon the table, my
gentleman! I...

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...the landlord apparently could not. He turned away, and
drew a long breath, and you may...

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...considered my own valour with amazement. I
had insulted him; I had sent him away alone;...

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...Edinburgh
without a single check. Fortune did not favour me, and why should I
recapitulate the details...

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...way home to
dinner.

On the north side of St. James' Square I was so happy as...

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...of bank-bills. "I
think, madam, that these are unexceptionable," said I.

"Ye'll be wantin' breakfast late?" was...

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...am, for the moment, in
precarious health. Much study hath heated my brain, much walking wearied
my--well,...

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...I would not call Lord Wellington my uncle! I, too,
have dared, perhaps bled, before the...

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...signal I remembered I
was due elsewhere.




CHAPTER XXVI

THE COTTAGE AT NIGHT


At the door I was nearly...

Page 195

...applied the words to my own
case!

Here was a dismal disposition for a lover. "Was ever...

Page 196

...of earshot of her formidable aunt.
Nothing was left but to apply my knowledge. I was...

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...bowed profoundly.

"You!" she said. "Here?"

"Yes, I am here," I replied. "I have come very far,...

Page 198

...have to speak, you have to listen. All is
true that they say of me, and...

Page 199

...the
first time that he had seen her; the interest that he seemed immediately
to conceive; and...

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...the
giant who gave his heart to his wife to keep for him, thinking it safer
to...

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...seen with mortification how
little he could do to mar the happiness of mortals. I stood...

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...I was in made it out of the question. I
could not go home till I...

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...and that the members would all be up and "as right as ninepence"
for the noon-day...

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...sang in the coppices as I went by. I had plenty to think of,
plenty to...

Page 205

...the
suburbs, and on into the streets of the New Town, which was as deserted
and silent...

Page 206

...to the task of
listening to Dr. Henry Gray.

As we moved out, after this ordeal was...

Page 207

...morning," said he;
"and I hope, when your mind is at rest (and it does you...

Page 208

...That was a main queer
church she took me to, Mr. Anne! I don't know as...

Page 209

...the name of the
minister, passed us lozenges, which I (for my part) handed on to...

Page 210

...a perhaps equal satisfaction from confiding in that breast of
iron. It made an immediate bond:...

Page 211

...am determined to be just."

"Very fairly spoken," said Mr. Robbie. "It is not much in...

Page 212

...Sim and
Candlish, would have been leeberated long ago, if it had not been for
their extraordinary...

Page 213

...a young man being a young
man--but no more drovers or rovers, if you love me!...

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...one apartment
there were tables set out, where the elders were solemnly engaged upon
whist; in the...

Page 215

...I, "which is very much
what I had counted upon doing. I did not come here...

Page 216

...told her my tale as briefly as I could,
and rose to seek Ronald. "You see,...

Page 217

...We were just walking away arm in arm, when I spied my
friend the Major approaching,...

Page 218

...just seeking her," he replied.

I was conscious of a certain thrill of temper; so, I...

Page 219

...said she.

"I fear not; I fear I shall be otherwise engaged," he replied. "Even the
pleasure...

Page 220

...with no superior steadfastness to
be admired for, who sees a lady's face, who hears her...

Page 221

...stood not on the order of my
going; and a moment after, I was on the...

Page 222

...you guessed it, that I really _am_ a little
behind board. But I haven't come to...

Page 223

...me--in Buckinghamshire," said I, smiling.

"Well, what I mean is, my dear St. Ives, that you...

Page 224

...said I.

"Well, other people say the reverse, you see!"

"They lie, Ronald, and I will prove...

Page 225

...he was gone.

The windows of my own sitting-room looked towards the north; but the
entrance passage...

Page 226

...face, and the deposit
receipt still in his hand.

"No go, Mr. Anne," says he.

"How's that?" I...

Page 227

...all for that Bow Street man being at the bank, he was not
there to look...

Page 228

...streets, it spells death to me, Rowley."

"If you please, sir," says Rowley.

"Come to think of...

Page 229

...a certain sniff,
between sympathy and defiance, with which she had announced it: "There's
your _Mercury_ for...

Page 230

...boy! Our beat is this path close
about the house. Down, Towzer! good boy, good boy--gently,...

Page 231

...to draw the money on the
deposit receipt. Second, I might apply again to Robbie. Or,...

Page 232

...remark upon."

A dreadful calm fell upon me.

"Was he anywise pale?" I asked.

"Well, it don't seem...

Page 233

...the house
on tiptoe, and actually ran downstairs, in the fear that she might call
me back....

Page 234

...my escape at last into the street.

I was now driven back upon the Assembly Ball....

Page 235

...win
by continual luck and unflagging effrontery! The strain had been too
long continued, and my nerve...

Page 236

...country was the very place for me:
and walking is an excellent sedative for the nerves....

Page 237

...no very promising
appearance, and here a room had been prepared for us, and we sat...

Page 238

...he
wept gently at times; would stop in the middle of the road, say firmly,
"No, no,...

Page 239

...get taken up by the police."

"My own case exactly," said I.

"Here, let's bilk them," said...

Page 240

...I had,
therefore, twelve mortal hours to wear through as best I could.
Doubtless it was this...

Page 241

...the herring. "It's
all ye'll get, Mr.--Ducie, if that's your name."

"Madam"--I held out the fish at...

Page 242

...long ago assured me, "My son, we know not when, but
some day they will come...

Page 243

...twenty-five of my guineas
into her keeping; this left me with five and a crown piece...

Page 244

...disquieting fire of
observation. The mirrors, reflectors, and girandoles had eyes for me;
and as I advanced...

Page 245

...the strain to echo.
Surely Flora would come: surely none of her guardians, natural or
officious, would...

Page 246

...be so rash?"

"For the simple reason that I have been a fool, my dear. I...

Page 247

...evening, my cousin! The newspaper told me you were favouring this
city with a stay."

"At Dumbreck's...

Page 248

...in this infernal _impasse_ my spirits
began to rise, to soar. I declare it: I led...

Page 249

...Major's arm, while I hurried to the card-room. As luck
would have it, the old lady...

Page 250

...of your wraps."

My eyes did not dare to bless her. We moved down the stairs--Miss
Gilchrist...

Page 251

...pulses sang together, "I love you! I love you!" in the
stuffy silence.

"Mosha Saint-Yvey!" spoke up...

Page 252

...a Paisley shawl of violent pattern. It occurred to me that I had
travelled much in...

Page 253

...will lift but a corner of the
sheet.

Wind in hidden gullies, and the talk of lapsing...

Page 254

...the
neighbourhood----"

The shock of it--the sudden descent upon sublimity, according to
Byfleld--took me...

Page 255

...woman's first instinct, when a man is
dear to her and in trouble, is to feed...

Page 256

...Rampant of Scotland, in imitation of the poor toy I had
carved for her--it seemed, so...

Page 257

...us
out of the cutting and upon the hillside. And here we pulled up together
with a...

Page 258

...to the hill: and as it secretly occurred to us
that the quarry might be her...

Page 259

...incoherence, I
plunged my way through the sightseers, and they gave me passage with all
the good-humour...

Page 260

...my dress and demeanour, and groaned
aloud.

"O, go away--get out of it, Ducie! Isn't one natural...

Page 261

...top of him; and borne to earth, prone beneath
the superincumbent bulk of his retainer, he...

Page 262

...was aware of a
voice--not the aeronaut's--speaking behind me, and, as it were, out of
the clouds--

"I...

Page 263

...not guessed
how rapidly.

We contemplated it from the height of six hundred feet--or so Byfield
asserted after...

Page 264

...him a present of the admission. Set me on a plane superficies, and
I will jog...

Page 265

...Heriot's Gardens when he made an
ascension there in October '85. He came down at Cupar....

Page 266

...'Viscount.' I took it at the time for a constable's trick;
but I begin to have...

Page 267

...him:--

"Now just you listen to me, Mr. Byfield. Pull that string, and a sadly
discredited aeronaut...

Page 268

...nails, as far from me as the car allowed.

The sea-fog had vanished, and the south...

Page 269

...on twenty hours--say twenty-four
at a pinch."

"We will test it. The current, I see, is still...

Page 270

...did not occur to me to smoke danger in this tomfoolery. I turned over
and dozed...

Page 271

...Dalmahoy
bent over the aeronaut, who was bleeding at the nose and now began to
breathe stertorously....

Page 272

...of us. This will be the Bristol
Channel: and the balloon is sinking. Pitch out some...

Page 273

...terraces climbing, tier upon tier, like seats in an
amphitheatre; its chimneys lifting their smoke over...

Page 274

...his face upturned
with the rest, and "Irishman" on every feature of it. And so the...

Page 275

...fell to their oars.

My teeth were chattering. These operations of salvage had taken time,
and it...

Page 276

...may guess, this is one of the famous Falmouth
packets?"

"As to that, sir, you are right,...

Page 277

...to tell you that this is not an ordinary
voyage."

"Nor, for that matter, is mine."

"You will...

Page 278

...the favour of pen, ink, and paper.
I wish to send a letter ashore, to the...

Page 279

...to write than 'I love you, Anne,' write it, and
commit it to...

Page 280

...after-braces!" Captain Colenso called to his crew. The yards
were trimmed and the _Lady Nepean_ slowly...

Page 281

...man, the crew, with faces once more inscrutable,
but twitching with spent emotion, scattered to their...

Page 282

...of
it."

"I suppose we were never in what you would call real danger?"

He faced me with...

Page 283

...been watching me eagerly. But he shook his head now, sighed, and
drew a small Bible...

Page 284

...British ensign flew at the peak. And as I turned my head, I
felt rather than...

Page 285

...splinter wounds;
for the enemy, her freeboard being lower by a foot or two than the...

Page 286

...the forbearance of a true-born son of freedom." Captain
Seccombe's voice took an oratorical roll. "He...

Page 287

...he laid it before the Lord; and then he laid it before
all of us. It...

Page 288

...story and his prisoners to Commodore Bainbridge,
who kept them pending news of Commodore Rodgers. They...

Page 289

...diligence flatly declined to proceed. The Cossacks and
Prussians were at the gates of Paris. "Last...

Page 290

...I had my ears alert for the sound of artillery.
But Paris kept silence. We passed...

Page 291

...and his band of walking gentlemen took
up the shout. The crowd looked on impassive; one...

Page 292

...laughable as I
made my escape good. At the same time, our encounter had put me...

Page 293

...for letters before long. You are to tell him that if he
expects one from'--see, I...

Page 294

...reality, then was I
the phantasm, the _revenant_; then was France--the France for which I
had fought...

Page 295

...answer, coldly enough:

"One moment, Monsieur le Vicomte, before I do myself the pleasure of
pitching you...

Page 296

...escape, and
particularly of my concern in the death of a fellow-prisoner named
Goguelat, formerly a marechal...

Page 297

...content if all the messieurs
Champdivers were to kill all the messieurs Goguelat and be shot...

Page 298

...natural affair in the world. I engaged my word, sir,
to have you watched. Will it...

Page 299

...this affair on _a point of honour_, which was quite a different thing
...

Page 300

...head of the
stairs and called down, "Dudgeon!"

Mr. Dudgeon appeared, and endeavoured to throw into the...

Page 301

...knees,
and, having dismissed Mr. Burchell Fenn, restored the discussion to a
businesslike footing. The end of...

Page 302

..._Vive Henri Quatre_! I have seen, in my
cousin Alain, of what the best blood in...

Page 303

...bath, the drastic cross seas of the Channel cleansed me of my
irritable humour, and left...

Page 304

...approbation--a
little pat on the back, as I may say. It is not often that I...

Page 305

...if I remember, to get used to Mrs. McRankine. To
be sure, her cooking----"

"That's what I...

Page 306

...and stay only for a wash and breakfast at
Dumbreck's before posting on to Swanston alone.

...

Page 307

...he exclaimed, stood stock-still for a moment,
and waddled off at top speed towards the back...

Page 308

... * * ...

Page 309

...the sentry at the outer gate stepped back and presented arms, and
the ponderous archway grew...