The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 11

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

Page 1

... ...

Page 2

... ...

Page 3

...days of our explorations, I am not without hope. There
should be left in our native...

Page 4

...noise of so many folk, made a new world for
me, after the moorland braes, the...

Page 5

...and person in the city,
had grown to form a brotherhood of spies; and I knew...

Page 6

...party of
armed soldiers, and, in their midst, a tall man in a great-coat. He
walked with...

Page 7

...wondering at my new
clothes; with that I blushed to my hair, and at the sight...

Page 8

...name of it makes
all there is of me rejoice. You will not have been long...

Page 9

...one hour, to talk with strangers!"

Here one of the gillies addressed her in what he...

Page 10

...yourself;
and if you will just say 'a friend to Miss Catriona' I will see you...

Page 11

...we're a' gaun ajee,
We're a' gaun east and wast courtin' Mally Lee."


FOOTNOTES:

...

Page 12

...The
deevil's buckie, I ken the button of him! And deil hae't! Where is he
now?"

I told...

Page 13

...lawyer chosen at random. No more remains, but to ask if you
will undertake my service?"

"I...

Page 14

...But it must be a lodging I may seem to have hit upon by
accident, for...

Page 15

...catch him--but James whatever! Go near
the Advocate with any such business, and you'll see! he'll...

Page 16

...man of your
intelligence."

"Hoot I none of your whillywhas!"[4] cries he. "There's intelligence
upon both sides. But...

Page 17

...dinner, all the three of us. When
that's done, I'll give you the direction of a...

Page 18

...than I was up
and into my new clothes; and no sooner the breakfast swallowed, than...

Page 19

...the expense of a little risk to
purchase greater safety. No doubt, until I had declared...

Page 20

...the neighbours that I saw at the
doorsteps talked in a strange tongue; and I found...

Page 21

...agriculture; I was pleased,
besides, to be so far in the still countryside; but the shackles...

Page 22

...worldly
honour I have no great stumble to reproach myself with; and my
difficulties have befallen me...

Page 23

...your name's sake and Rankeillor's, and
perhaps a little for your own, I will do what...

Page 24

...more than one,"
said I. "And your letter, which I take a pleasure to thank you...

Page 25

...of it," he replied, with a chuckle. "The lads
must have forgotten you. But you are...

Page 26

...jesting
humour--which is far from the case--I believe I might lay a claim on
your lordship for...

Page 27

...of an ill intention. That nobleman, whom we all honour, and
who has indeed been wounded...

Page 28

...he encouragingly. "Nor yet (if you are
careful) to fear the consequences."

"My lord," said I, "speaking...

Page 29

...to appreciate, and
which (unless you be more careful) may prove to be in vain."

"I do...

Page 30

...we cannot catch our man. But the matter of Breck's
innocence shoots beyond itself. Once admitted,...

Page 31

...Drummossie. Who saved
it? I repeat; who saved the Protestant religion and the whole frame of
our...

Page 32

...but of two
things: of a poor soul in the immediate and unjust danger of a...

Page 33

...of my thoughts, which dwelt continually on the
interview with Prestongrange, inhibiting me from all attention....

Page 34

...should be known to many that I
know not."

"That you know not in the least, sir,"...

Page 35

...help me; while a comparative stranger like
yourself--"

I would be ashamed to set down all he...

Page 36

...sat close at her
embroidery, only looking now and again and smiling; but the misses, and
especially...

Page 37

...significance that gave my heart a jog. "Why that,
Miss Grant?" I asked.

"Why," says she, "if...

Page 38

...a kind
of brightness in her like a coal of fire. As much as the others...

Page 39

...of introduction;
this could be no other than the forfeited Master of Lovat and chief of
the...

Page 40

...here
to discharge my errand in good faith; it is in vain you think to divert
me....

Page 41

...I.

"Aha, but not so!" he cried, "and you do not yet see to the bottom...

Page 42

...greatly horrified by so much baseness, and
much unmanned by the immediacy and ugliness of my...

Page 43

...must not let that extend to innocent members of my
family. These are greatly engaged to...

Page 44

...lives by all
extremities. My scalp curdled among my hair, and the next moment the
blood leaped...

Page 45

...and my judgment
made. I thought her a lass of a clean honour, like a man's;...

Page 46

...young lady's
invitation.

"O, so you're Saxpence!" she cried, with a very sneering manner. "A braw
gift, a...

Page 47

...me rather a home-thrust when you ask if I
would marry, at the gallows' foot, a...

Page 48

...ye may come here for deil care what!
I'm good enough Whig to sit quiet, and...

Page 49

...day for
your saxpence!" she cried after me as I left.

My skirmish with this disconcerting lady...

Page 50

...and told her where and
when.

"I did not see you," she said. "My eyes are big,...

Page 51

...I, beginning to tremble.
"Perhaps neither your father nor I are in the best of good...

Page 52

...killed and shamed. If this is
the way I am to fall, and me scarce a...

Page 53

...not much older than myself? And because you said a word too much in
a friend's...

Page 54

...an end."

"You have news for me?" cried I.

"Beyond anticipation," he replied. "Your testimony is after...

Page 55

...was immediately after the murder?"

"It was."

"Did you speak to him?"

"I did."

"You had known him before,...

Page 56

...eldest
considered me with something that at times appeared like mirth; and
though I thought I did...

Page 57

...tam
lowland scoon'rel!" cries he, and hit me a buffet on the jaw with his
closed fist.

I...

Page 58

...off and on, and
menaced me with his blade in the air. As I had seen...

Page 59

...would give an eye himself to have me educated.

"You can do me a better service...

Page 60

...you should hear," said I, and turned to Duncansby.

"I have only to say this," said...

Page 61

...was for the first time angry.
The Advocate had made a mock of me. He had...

Page 62

...no less."

"Hout awa!" cried Stewart. "I'll never believe that."

"I have maybe a suspicion of my...

Page 63

...then!" cries the
Writer. "He has had Alan summoned once; that was on the twenty-fifth,
the day...

Page 64

...conspiracy?"

"It will bear that colour," said I.

"And I'll go on to prove it you outright,"...

Page 65

...stranger is in
Fleming's printing-house, spies a proof on the floor, picks it up, and
carries it...

Page 66

...affair; if young Lovat is to handle yours, it'll
be all in the family. What's James...

Page 67

...and her kinsfolk
the Glengyle Macgregors appeared almost certainly to be employed against
me, it was just...

Page 68

...of pains
to flatter me; always cleverly, always with the appearance of a banter,
still calling me...

Page 69

...and that. Then it comes to the place of the fighting, and
it comes over me...

Page 70

...brave and staunch and kind, God bless him! That
will be a strange day when I...

Page 71

...the wine excellent, for it seems that Mrs. Ogilvy was rich.
Our talk, too, was pleasant...

Page 72

...door of my own tears.

"I praise God for your kindness, dear," said I. "Farewell, my...

Page 73

...white face. "Neil
is in Edinburgh on errands from my father."

"It is what I fear," said...

Page 74

...to go
dovering round in the black night with two men's lives at my girdle!
Catriona, try...

Page 75

...More; in which case, I should have done all I could to hang
Catriona's father, and...

Page 76

...country; and as I lay there
on my back, the next three or four hours, I...

Page 77

...cast myself wholly out of conceit with my own character, and
jeopardised the lives of James...

Page 78

...you have before
you."

"We'll have a long crack of it first," said he.

"Well, indeed, and I...

Page 79

...number, or
the double of it, nearer hand!" cries he.

"It matters the less," said I, "because...

Page 80

...like old days while it lasts, Davie; and (come the time) we'll have
to think what...

Page 81

...great change of it from the
belly of my haystack; and while you were there sottering...

Page 82

...on my shoulder, "and guessed when
the two hours would be about by--unless Charlie Stewart would...

Page 83

...fellow," said I, "you forget it was just me."

"Na," said he, "but three times!"

"When ye...

Page 84

...in the care of my chieftain," said he,
"Charles Stewart, of Ardshiel, Esquire, at the town...

Page 85

...had been a
young lassie, or onyways bonny, she would never have heard tell of my
stomach,...

Page 86

...him there was, and where it led to.

"Then, sir," says he to me, "I think...

Page 87

...Do ye see me coming, Davie?
Thanks to Johnnie Cope and other red-coat gomerils, I should...

Page 88

...I mind that (as we
drew closer to it) by some door or window of these...

Page 89

..."this is no' like you. It's got to be now or never."

"This is...

Page 90

...fingers and whistled to it like a dog.

It was now perhaps a third of the...

Page 91

...should be one decent man in such a land of
thieves! My word is passed, and...

Page 92

...With that I turned my back
upon the sea and faced the sandhills. There was no...

Page 93

...the least thing nearer without speech
or hurry. Every eye was upon mine, which struck me...

Page 94

...ye a paper like this?" and held up one in his
hand. Neil produced a second,...

Page 95

...where they were taking me; only looked here and there
for the appearance of a ship;...

Page 96

...if ye have come so fairly by your preeson."

"But none dwells there now," I cried;...

Page 97

...do my part and
take my place beside the rest of you; and I ask you...

Page 98

...the smoke flowed over
our heads, and the geese rose in number beyond computation or belief....

Page 99

...pipes, and the dawn rising behind
them out of the North Sea.

No doubt it was a...

Page 100

...James Stewart in his dungeon and the lamentations of his wife. Then,
indeed, passion began to...

Page 101

...as I was first arrested--does that sound like law to
you? or does it sound like...

Page 102

...yet said little of the Highlanders. They were all three of the
followers of James More,...

Page 103

...I fell in a muse beside the fire and
(that little air of Alan's coming back...

Page 104

...on
sentry, the place a' wheesht, the frosts o' winter maybe riving in the
wa's, and he...

Page 105

...a profane swearer. And
there was Peden glowering at him, gash an' waefu'; Peden wi' his...

Page 106

...Nae mainner o' service! There he sat on his dowp,
an' cawed the shuttle and smiled...

Page 107

...thing dementit. There never was the
solan made that wroucht as that solan wroucht; and it...

Page 108

...I
mind, and the way that the fish lay broucht us near in by the Bass,
whaur...

Page 109

...the gun."

Aweel, so it was agreed between them twa. I was just a bairn, an'...

Page 110

...muckle better; there was little said in
Sandie's boat but just the name of God; and...

Page 111

...Neil, and the black knife was
in his hand that moment.

There was no time to think;...

Page 112

...proud of, and there was only the present to consider. I
could not swim the sea,...

Page 113

...set for the trial, I passed in such misery of mind as I can scarce
recall...

Page 114

...as this letter came from. So there remained but one step to be
accounted for; and...

Page 115

...is
in the east, my road lies westward; keep your boat, I hire it; let us
work...

Page 116

...still in both the lee and
the shadow of the rock, which last lay broad upon...

Page 117

...Stirling. In a
little more than an hour I had passed that town and was already...

Page 118

...water; I was so weary I could
hardly limp, and my face was like a ghost's....

Page 119

...of Mr. Erskine; thence again to Argyle,
where he sat between the other two lords of...

Page 120

...What remained to be done, or how I was to do
it, was what he never...

Page 121

...my
view) has very much the appearance of a fourth."

"Allow me, sirs!" interposed Stewart the Writer....

Page 122

...out, he seemed the mere picture
of a merry slyness. It was plain he had a...

Page 123

...from Mr. Balfour's cause.
But, properly guided, Mr. Stewart, tenderly guided, it shall prove a
peaceful revolution."

"And...

Page 124

...several, among the which he was good enough
to mention mine. I hope he will pardon...

Page 125

...time to be too late; going on to explain the
reasons of loyalty and public interest...

Page 126

...he replied drily, "and I think
this can scarce be the matter you called me from...

Page 127

...the seal," said he.

"I have it not," said I. "It bore not even an address,...

Page 128

...mingled with awe," says he, smiling.

"I am more than willing, I am earnestly desirous to...

Page 129

...I will be punctually ready to
attend your lordship," said I.

He shook hands with me. "And...

Page 130

...Airlie," and began
thus:

"It fell on a day when Argyle was on the bench,
...

Page 131

...and altogether made more of than I
thought accorded either with my parts or station; so...

Page 132

...not the pleasure of remembering it.

"Why," says he, "it was Miss Grant herself presented me!...

Page 133

...tell you
that story, the authorities have decided you are to hear it otherwise
and from a...

Page 134

...it were only
known) the malefactor is a _protegee_ of his lordship my papa. I am...

Page 135

..."And I wager she
guessed nothing.... But I beg your pardon, this is to tread upon
forbidden...

Page 136

...think that you would like me? But ye told me yourself ye had an
interest!"

I stopped...

Page 137

...was the little problem I had set him of a sudden,
and to which he had...

Page 138

...all days."

Doig speaking somewhat broad, I had been led by imitation into an accent
much more...

Page 139

...to be twice bidden, and did justice to Miss Grant's
citation on the way to Dean.

Old...

Page 140

...with whom I so much desired to be alone again,
observed me quizzically, and seemed to...

Page 141

...was something indulgent in the lady's
eye which made me suppose there might be better coming.

"You...

Page 142

...you are bonny, at all
events_.--_The way God made me, my dear_, I said, _but I...

Page 143

...hours to rally me in," said I; "and I think besides
you do yourself injustice. I...

Page 144

...do that for a new-whelped puppy! I have
had more than that to set me up,...

Page 145

...cried. "There is one thing that
must be stopped, being mere ruin to herself, and to...

Page 146

...I think she gave me much the same attention
as she gave the rest of the...

Page 147

...to go quite fully over my
affairs, sitting perhaps two hours with the Writer in his...

Page 148

...and a bit of a
smile continually bitten in as she regarded me. She seemed indeed...

Page 149

...(as the soldiers say)
that I should have done as I was here bidden and gone...

Page 150

...three feet away, such is the straitness
of that close, it was possible to look into...

Page 151

...I was free, I upbraided Miss Grant for her
cruelty.

"I am sorry you was disappointed," says...

Page 152

...been hanged by fraud and violence, and the world wagged along, and
there was not a...

Page 153

...sides, it
would have looked cold-like to be anyways stiff. Accordingly, I got my
courage up and...

Page 154

...was very
little troublesome, for the reason that the day was a flat calm, very
frosty and...

Page 155

...Baby have been telling me!" she cried; and then
remembered a letter she had been given,...

Page 156

...in the world would do the same."

"Everybody?" says she.

"Every living soul!" said I.

"Ah, then, that...

Page 157

...more, we two,
of pardon or offence."

We stood after that silent, Catriona looking on the deck...

Page 158

...our
conversation, and neither one of us the less pleased. Whiles she would
tell me old wives'...

Page 159

...is not much that I have done," said she, "and I could be telling you
the...

Page 160

...not know," said she; "I am only telling you the seeming in my
heart. And then...

Page 161

..._if she would be at the pains_; and she bade me go away and
she would...

Page 162

...friendship that was fancied!" I cried.
"What kind of justice do you call this, to blame...

Page 163

...was so quick to avoid me, and so constant to keep
herself surrounded with others, that...

Page 164

...backed like a partan-crab, came gingerly
alongside, and the skipper of it hailed our master in...

Page 165

...well, I thank
you."

There was a pretty country simplicity in this that made some laugh,
others looked...

Page 166

...the patroon humoured his boat nearer in than was perhaps
wholly safe, and Catriona leaped into...

Page 167

...in the expression. "I do not think my
heart is true."

"Yet there are very few that...

Page 168

...town so clean you might have
dined upon the causeway. Sprott was within, upon his ledgers,...

Page 169

...this man has been to me."

"Very good, sir," said I. "Then I will make that...

Page 170

...affair to seem quite
easy.

"Now," said I, "let us get back to yon same inn where...

Page 171

...run in the most incredible brief time, the wind holding
strong till they reached port; by...

Page 172

...of many thousands walking and talking;
on the other, it was dark, and the water bubbled...

Page 173

...road.
It proved a cruel problem; and it may have been one or two at night...

Page 174

...that. I will never, never forgive her, and let me hear tell of
her no more."

"Well,"...

Page 175

...impatiently, to keep it.

"Indeed and I will do no such thing," said I. "Here am...

Page 176

...and might be paying for the curiosity of that sight."

I could have kissed her for...

Page 177

...I am afraid," said she.

"No, but I ought to warn you," I began; and then...

Page 178

...This was all very well; but the trouble was
that Mr. Balfour in his letter of...

Page 179

...without so much spirit in his belly as to remark her
prettiness, for which I scorned...

Page 180

...business becomes beautiful. The Dutch
chintzes I should say were extraordinary cheap and fine; but I...

Page 181

...afforded. But I had rushed in where
angels might have feared to tread, and there was...

Page 182

...my heart was altogether melted. We made our meal with
infinite mirth and tenderness; and the...

Page 183

...Latinity is rather better than I thought I could
ever have compassed. The evil of this...

Page 184

...I do not know the name of that flower, but it was of the pink
colour,...

Page 185

...it for you, Catriona," said I.

She fixed it in the midst of her bosom with...

Page 186

...all of them; she clung near to me in the
falling snow; it beat about and...

Page 187

...think when I sit there, reading
in that fool-book that I have just burned, and be...

Page 188

...greater--it was upon a nature so defenceless, and with such
advantages of the position, that I...

Page 189

...looking
till my head ached for any possible means of separation. Here were the
means come to...

Page 190

...my mind the
recollection of the clothes that I had bought for her; and I thought
this...

Page 191

...was between me
and nobody," I cried. "Nobody offered in my place, and I must say...

Page 192

...which I have expended and be
done."

He seemed to soothe me with a hand in the...

Page 193

...a cover for yourself, and delay the meal
the matter of an hour, which will give...

Page 194

...not to be supposed I had
been absent from her pillow thoughts. Upon the back of...

Page 195

...on the whole to find my way cleared, the girl again in
proper keeping, the father...

Page 196

...as a chimney to hold me warm, and no society but my own
thoughts. These were...

Page 197

...she asked.

"It was not unkindly meant," I replied.--"What ails you, Catriona? What
have I done to...

Page 198

...that's a certain thing. But
this is a kind of a farewell too: it's a kind...

Page 199

...she agreed, and (strange as it may seem) I quite
believed her. Indeed, I thought myself...

Page 200

...He would
press, and indeed beseech us to entertain him with our talk--a thing
very difficult in...

Page 201

...Leyden; the other two were out of
Scotland and prompted by the same affair, which was...

Page 202

...not wholly regular.

Meanwhile, I had opened Miss Grant's, and could not withhold an
exclamation.

"Catriona," I cried,...

Page 203

...enough to bear me company till you
return." She made haste to obey him without words....

Page 204

...pleased to be quite plain at last," said I.

"And I believe I have been plain...

Page 205

...that blithely, if she is entirely willing. But if there be
the least unwillingness, as I...

Page 206

...not seem to have
remarked his daughter's dresses, which were indeed all equally new to
him,--and from...

Page 207

...appearance.
Between these extremes I stood helpless, and could have bit my fingers;
so that, when at...

Page 208

...made a little noise in her head, and I thought she would
have run.

"Without which," I...

Page 209

...will need the two of us to make this matter end in peace."

"Ay," said she....

Page 210

...were a friend's
words; bonnily have I been paid for them! Now you have refused me...

Page 211

...passenger looked at me, which
brought me to myself.

"Well," I thought, "I have been a gull...

Page 212

...Miss Drummond," said I, "I must speak to your father by
myself."

She went into her own...

Page 213

...have got me to that pitch that
the bare name of soldier rises on my stomach....

Page 214

...I had frequently remarked; and once that she
had it on I remembered telling her (by...

Page 215

...God to see her re-established.
Our manner of life is very much alone,...

Page 216

...same mind," said I.

"The strange thing is that ye seem to have a kind of...

Page 217

...at Dunkirk.

"You will now be enjoying the society of my old comrade, Mr. Stewart,"
he wrote....

Page 218

...lighted
suburb, which we thridded for a while, then turned into a dark lane, and
presently found...

Page 219

...him speak so straight to people's
hearts; the sound of his voice was like song.

"What? will...

Page 220

...it; for, James More returning suddenly, the girl was changed
into a piece of stone. Through...

Page 221

...any one of them honest, and the position of his
inn was the best of his...

Page 222

...fine to see
yon French nobleman, Davie; and I daresay you could find an employ to
yoursel',...

Page 223

...of what a desolate wilderness that inn stood hidden in; where
was no man to be...

Page 224

...said I, "but for you, as you know well."

"And you have no right to be...

Page 225

...I had forgot why I was happy; only I knew she stooped,
and I felt her...

Page 226

...it, and yon officer that stayed ashore! He would
not be alone either; there must be...

Page 227

...not it's probable that he's alone--I would rather you
considered for yourself."

"A letter to James More?"...

Page 228

...that
laid him on his nose. Then he stood, with a savage smile, and watched
him scramble...

Page 229

...Alan; and then in the same tone of childlike
interest, "it has naething to do with...

Page 230

...rag. I knew him well enough--I knew it must have
pierced him in the quick place...

Page 231

...just himself again.

"And now by your leave, my dawties," said he, "this is a' very...

Page 232

...running at once; and mopping at his brow, "They're a real
bonny folk, the French nation,"...

Page 233

...sick, and like to die. I thought I saw by my wife's face what way
her...

Page 234

...that you have seen and spoken with. Alison Hastie in
Limekilns was the lass that rocked...