The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 23

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

Page 1

... 19
To the Same ...

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... ...

Page 3

... 86
...

Page 4

... 111
...

Page 5

... ...

Page 6

... 156
To Sidney Colvin ...

Page 7

... To the Same ...

Page 8

... 199
...

Page 9

... To W. E. Henley ...

Page 10

... 235
To Edmund Gosse ...

Page 11

... 260
...

Page 12

... 285
...

Page 13

... 309
To the Same ...

Page 14

... 325
...

Page 15

... To Alexander Ireland ...

Page 16

...technical hints as even
the most brilliant beginner may take from an older hand, partly by
recommending...

Page 17

...of industry and spirit in
letter-writing extraordinary considering his health and his occupations.
It was indeed he...

Page 18

...in this
country has thought to dispose of him by the charge of 'externality.'
But the reader...

Page 19

...allured and taught him.

'He loved of life the myriad sides,
Pain,...

Page 20

...actor's gusto, to play a part and make a drama out of life:
but the part...

Page 21

...of a Scots maker who has his own outlook on life, his own
special and profitable...

Page 22

...poetic animation; for harmony of cadence
and the well-knit structure of sentences; and for the art...

Page 23

...those of the living. This was a point upon which in
his lifetime he felt strongly....

Page 24

...was most of a correspondent, was in truth a
tale of daily and nightly battle against...

Page 25

...had been one in the
practical sense as well as in the sense of taking a...

Page 26

...or for striking a key of expression and keeping
it, but becomes simply the most spontaneous...

Page 27

...of his own conduct and the validity of the
accepted codes and compromises of society. He...

Page 28

...his hand on my arm as
we lay basking for his health's sake in a boat...

Page 29

...and feeling, ardent in attachment, and
full of pity for the weak and suffering, is to...

Page 30

...well,' said
Great-heart." "'I have not forgotten my umbrella,' said the careful man;
but the lightning struck...

Page 31

...diffusing
itself from the speaker, a glow of eager benignity and affectionate
laughter emanating from his presence,...

Page 32

...him;
for the English policeman even, on whom he often tried, quite in vain,
to pass himself...

Page 33

...me to contain enough
signs of the future master-writer, enough of character, observation, and
skill in expression,...

Page 34

...which in later
life she adapted herself to conditions of life and travel the most
unconventional possible....

Page 35

...et demi le prix etait 17
shillings. Sur la soiree de Monseigneur Faux il y etait...

Page 36

...and lighthouses. From
1867 the family life became more settled between Edinburgh and Swanston
Cottage, Lothianburn, a...

Page 37

...and a love of low company. Stevenson was, however,
in his own fashion an eager student...

Page 38

...heart was set, and in which his
early attempts had been encouraged, being held to be...

Page 39

...of dogmatic
Christianity in general, and had taught him to respect all creeds alike
as expressions of...

Page 40

...myself a severe attack of
gripes by two days' total abstinence on chilly table beer I...

Page 41

...a common working-man!" I told
him I thought he would be less happy earning a comfortable...

Page 42

...I came here, were
black with people, fishers waiting on wind and night. Now all the...

Page 43

...would see by papa's letter about the carpenter who fell off the
staging: I don't think...

Page 44

...read on to the end of
Betteredge's narrative, so don't know anything about it yet.

I thought...

Page 45

...four men in the boat. We dropped an anchor out a good bit, then
tied a...

Page 46

...looks like a three days' gale.

Last week has been a blank one: always too much...

Page 47

...Mrs.
Sutherland at the door. "There's a ship ashore at Shaltigoe!" As my
senses slowly flooded, I...

Page 48

...at least. This was not a
great storm, the waves were light and short. Yet when...

Page 49

...until the bay received and quenched them. I hired a boat
and skulled round the yacht...

Page 50

...travelling; and I said I was so fond of
travelling alone, from the people one met...

Page 51

...Bough (who had been in huge force the whole time,
drawing in Miss Amy's sketchbook and...

Page 52

...in comes the tureen
and the hand-maid lifts the cover. "Rice soup!" I yell; "O no!...

Page 53

...DEAR FATHER,--No landing to-day, as the sea runs high on the rock.
They are at the...

Page 54

...bad
grammar, or forget to finish a sentence, or do something or other that
looks fallible, it...

Page 55

... 1871?

MY DEAR CUMMY,--I was greatly pleased by your letter in many...

Page 56

...expect me. I came yesterday afternoon to
Bridge of Allan, and have been very happy ever...

Page 57

...three crows cawing in my heart, as I heard them
this morning: I vote for old...

Page 58

...such weather, and
doesn't set up his lungs and cry back to the birds and the...

Page 59

...the contrast of the
great masses of lamplit foliage and the dark sapphire night sky with
just...

Page 60

...the three daughters received me as if I was
a friend of the family and had...

Page 61

...the _Eckenheimer Wirthschaft_, and had left behind him a most savoury
memory in the hearts of...

Page 62

...that I can gather.
I am grown most insufferably national, you see. I fancy it is...

Page 63

...Teutons, with no deception, spring, or false bottom.
About half-past one there began such a trumpeting,...

Page 64

...much.
Simpson and I seem to get on very well together. We suit each other
capitally; and...

Page 65

...they, too, make themselves heard from time to time
in little incomprehensible antiphonies, about the drift...

Page 66

... But at last the times are bettered
And once more...

Page 67

...in life but plainly,
How they stir our spirits vainly
...

Page 68

...sun, music, and
all the rest can never take down our gusty, rainy, smoky, grim old...

Page 69

...ever) be accomplished, the feverish unrests and
damnable indecisions, that it takes all my easy-going spirits...

Page 70

...out
of another land, where they are not so wise as they are here, but fancy
that...

Page 71

...I help it? They don't see either that my
game is not the light-hearted scoffer; that...

Page 72

...marriage of the hostess. I
was shortly due to join the party, when Mrs. Sitwell wrote...

Page 73

...went accordingly to Mentone, a place he had delighted
in as a boy ten years before,...

Page 74

...heart nor time for it to-day.

R. L. S.




TO MRS. SITWELL


...

Page 75

... The paper on _Roads_ herein mentioned had been planned during walks
...

Page 76

...but I mean
_Roads_, and shall do something to them.

I wish I could make you feel...

Page 77

...have remained alive after that; either he knew his woman too
well, or else he was...

Page 78

...away in front till the two
shores join together. When the tide is out there are...

Page 79

...not seem surprising that I can keep
the lamp alight, through all this gusty weather, in...

Page 80

...or perhaps money to
buy a meal, or perhaps even a bed. My heart shivers for...

Page 81

...L70) to the poor woman who
served him as heroine in the _Heart of Midlothian_, and...

Page 82

...I have yet
to learn in ordinary conversation that reserve and silence that I must
try to...

Page 83

...in the future, but said something that _may_ do
good. But a little better or a...

Page 84

...been awake all night and knew
not yet of the new, cool day. This appealed to...

Page 85

...my attempt to
write about him, I got _tete-montee_, rushed out up to M. S., came...

Page 86

...knew; sometimes it looks, as it
looked to-night, interminable, a way leading right into the heart...

Page 87

...shut teeth, that one hears between the gusts only. I am
in excellent humour with myself,...

Page 88

...I had ever remarked it before; there is something of unspeakable
appeal in the cadence. I...

Page 89

...great town during
frost, but now solitary and silent; and when I shut my eyes I...

Page 90

...which (even if I go on mending at
the very great pace I have made already)...

Page 91

...so it is. I
must have a certain feeling of being at home, and my head...

Page 92

...its bells and drums
and bugles; for the old city has no equal for multitude of...

Page 93

...to an hotel porter and set off to
walk at once. I was somewhat confused as...

Page 94

...the bone caves. F. Bacon (Lord Chancellor)
made the remark that "Time was the greatest innovator";...

Page 95

...all, now I think of
it, it is only a week since I left.

I have here...

Page 96

...and the brambles; the women especially, with
the weights poised on their heads and walking all...

Page 97

...keep well; and again I say, _anything_
rather than not to keep well.

Not that I am...

Page 98

...my lap and into my face. I lay down on my
back at last, and looked...

Page 99

...shall be a help
to you soon in every way and no more a trouble and...

Page 100

...I mean when I am able for
anything. However I am much better already; and have...

Page 101

...It was about mothers' meetings, and it was damned small, and it
was my ewe lamb--the...

Page 102

...yours, _mon vieux_,

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO MRS. SITWELL


...

Page 103

...to feel
my spirits come back to me again at the thought!

_Thursday._--I sat along the beach...

Page 104

...Old Monaco. The day is grey and clouded, with a little red
light on the horizon,...

Page 105

...is to avoid complication of
addresses. It is quite fatal. If two P. R.'s have contradictory...

Page 106

...land" as I have done since I have been here installed. There
was a dish of...

Page 107

...(and somewhat
dogmatical) son,

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO MRS. THOMAS STEVENSON


...

Page 108

...of her accomplishments, she was brought round the table after the
meal was over, and said...

Page 109

...Vatel for the future. Monsieur
Follete, our host, is a Vatel by the way. He cooks...

Page 110

...this morning,
augured well for my recovery; he said youth must be putting in strong;
of course...

Page 111

...end. Madame G.'s daughter danced a tarantella, which
was very pretty.

Whenever Nelitchka cries--and she never cries...

Page 112

...pretty fair, they say,
of me and as they are particular in the matter of photographs,...

Page 113

...and again in my face,
carried me back to storms that I have enjoyed, O how...

Page 114

...friend--that is who was the friend of Pompey's
friend--because he (the friend of Pompey's friend) had...

Page 115

...wishes to say she is ill, and there is
the Russian "bulla"; she wishes to be...

Page 116

...a little too hard and too much in the style of those decadent
curiosities, poems without...

Page 117

...odd
how it irritates you to hear certain political statements made. He was
excited, and he began...

Page 118

...thread in History, and notably in that of his
own land. _Voila, madame, le menu. Comment...

Page 119

..."The Flowers of the Forest"--"Auld
Lang Syne"--"Scots wha hae"--"Wandering Willie"--"Jock o'
Hazeldean"--"My Boy Tammie," which my father...

Page 120

...hundred and ninety-nine
thousandths of the advantage of our society, never consent to pay a
single tax...

Page 121

...dressed as
a contadina and looked beautiful; and little Nellie, in red satin cap
and wonderful red...

Page 122

...you are better again: nobody can
expect to be _quite_ well in February, that is the...

Page 123

...but that's no odds, it breaks the back of the trouble.--Ever
your affectionate son,

...

Page 124

...keeping up a structure
that may never be worth it--all this good money sent after bad....

Page 125

...such a still small voice at the hinder end of it all. All this
while he...

Page 126

...either rejuvenate or slay."

[10] Alluding to Heine's _Ritter von dem heiligen Geist_.

...

Page 127

...the same as in
the preceding winter.




TO SIDNEY COLVIN


Written in Paris on his...

Page 128

...South_ appeared in Macmillan's
Magazine at this date; that on Victor Hugo's romances...

Page 129

...Fortnightly Review, which he was then editing, of Lord Lytton's newly
published volume,...

Page 130

...all. Mme.
Garschine's was rather sad and gave me the blues a bit; I think it...

Page 131

...long if all goes
well; so on that ground, I cannot force you to come to...

Page 132

...or the reverse if you can. I would willingly
recall it if I could.

Try, by way...

Page 133

...malady.

_Thursday._--It is curious how calm I am in such a case. I wait with
perfect composure...

Page 134

...cloudy and the day perhaps
even a little gloomy; but under this grey roof, in this...

Page 135

...thing I see so clearly. Death is the end
neither of joy nor sorrow. Let us...

Page 136

...of the grief in which I find myself; but one cannot always come to
meet a...

Page 137

...birds. There was a splendid sunlit silence about us, and
as Katharine said the heavens seemed...

Page 138

...in its small way reading aloud seem the best
rewarded of all arts. I am sure...

Page 139

...Portfolio ever
re-published until after the writer's death. _The Appeal to the
...

Page 140

... Place and date

You know the class...

Page 141

...or at least _look_ far more faithfully, in which
spirit men rarely look in vain. You...

Page 142

...place much; but somehow I feel glad when I get
among the quiet eighteenth century buildings,...

Page 143

...you laugh at the time, but was somehow laughable to
recollect. Moreover, he had so far...

Page 144

...the banks of the river. The heather and furze are in flower at once
and make...

Page 145

...with a high hand now.

It is raining here; and I have been working at John...

Page 146

...I
was, unless I could cry out a farewell with a great voice over the ruin
and...

Page 147

...it is always working in my head, and
if I can only turn on the right...

Page 148

...will keep well, I am all
right: if they won't--well I'll do as well as I...

Page 149

...in a rather pleasant and
entirely amicable discussion which we had this afternoon on a walk....

Page 150

...been colder than ever; and to-night there is a
truculent wind about the house, shaking the...

Page 151

...visit to London.

[_London, November 1874._]

When I left you I found...

Page 152

...black morning, before a little vacant half-lit station,
with a name up that I had never...

Page 153

...wonderful general effect--one of my best in fact. Do
not now force yourself to make any...

Page 154

...the same blue, piled itself up, with here and there a lit
window, until it could...

Page 155

...off in cloudland or feel their steady eyes
shining, like quiet watchful stars, above the turmoil...

Page 156

...little boy, three years
old perhaps, half frantic with terror, and crying to every one for...

Page 157

...I was telling him how I was going to take
him to a gentleman who would...

Page 158

...passion, and once wring your lips out upon hers, would it not
be a small thing...

Page 159

...till after nightfall. The
little booths that hucksters set up round the edge were marked each...

Page 160

...find no word for it more specific than superb--all I
know is that all my knowledge...

Page 161

...game has still to be played,
and a lot of dim notions must become definite and...

Page 162

...some in India, one in the backwoods--it
gave one a wide look over the world to...

Page 163

...does not seem to me to have put that paper of mine in this
month; so...

Page 164

...Court (in gremio).

VII. The Family of Love (in...

Page 165

...such a longing for children of my own; and yet I do not think
I could...

Page 166

...great King's palace of the blue air. He has taught
himself two languages since he has...

Page 167

...at first, as bad as
I have been for nearly a year; but the forest begins...

Page 168

...seven, and to-day from four (with
interval for dinner) to eleven. You see the sad strait...

Page 169

...so nice to feel you have been dead three
hundred years, and the sound of your...

Page 170

...splendid picture here in Edinburgh. A Ruysdael of which
one can never tire: I think it...

Page 171

...willing and
wishing and striving leads a man nowhere after all. Here I am back again
in...

Page 172

..._Fontainebleau_ is the paper called _Forest Notes_, afterwards
printed in the Cornhill Magazine....

Page 173

...the light it throws on the writer's care and
kindness as an...

Page 174

...Fielding and
Richardson. Yet surely Hugo's own dramas are a sufficient proof...

Page 175

...I confess that I don't quite
see in what sense it decides...

Page 176

...Richmond Seeley.

[17] The essay _Notes on the Movements of Young Children_.

[18]...

Page 177

...own at all hazards. But of this hereafter. To continue
briefly the annals of the time:...

Page 178

...In May 1878 followed his first travel
book, _The Inland Voyage_, containing the account of his...

Page 179

...you said of him, and asked me to
forward these to you for your opinion. One...

Page 180

... ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO MRS. SITWELL


At this time Stevenson was much occupied,...

Page 181

...the door--
We'll walk the woods no more.

ROBERT LOUIS...

Page 182

...survived myself, and somehow live on, a curious changeling, a
merry ghost; and do not mind...

Page 183

... change of rooms.

[_Edinburgh, Autumn 1875._]

MY DEAR COLVIN,--Thanks for...

Page 184

...at ease! The
future is thick with inky fingers. And then perhaps nobody would
publish. _Ah nom...

Page 185

...gives a lively picture of winter forenoons spent in the
Parliament House:--

...

Page 186

...aye the ither bottle drew
To inclination.

Sae let...

Page 187

...gone into a mild, babbling, sunny
idiocy. I shall buy a Jew's harp and sit by...

Page 188

...do a little
more work, and I have been much better contented with myself; but I
can't...

Page 189

...turned out more difficult
than I expected in some places, but there is a deal of...

Page 190

...been so long of writing, and show your
pardon by writing soon to me; it will...

Page 191

...it was what I
would have chosen. I am tempted every day of my life to...

Page 192

...sweet to
be wholesome.

I am at Charles d'Orleans. About fifteen Cornhill pages have already
coule'd from under...

Page 193

...three weeks after I began. Do, please,
forgive me.

To the Highlands, first, to the Jenkins'; then...

Page 194

... _17 Heriot Row, Edinburgh, May 1877._

... A perfect chorus of repudiation...

Page 195

...another story, _The Sire de Maletroit's Mousetrap_: a
true novel, in the old sense; all unities...

Page 196

...the Mill_ I sent, red hot, to
Stephen in a fit of haste, and have not...

Page 197

...have the honour to inhabit. And as your present was the
first sign to the contrary,...

Page 198

...may we not
add?--a rather dry lady. Did you--I forget--did you have a kick at the
stern...

Page 199

...(perhaps partial) apprehension of such of them as adorn our
own characters. When I see a...

Page 200

...You know best what you have done for me, and so
you will know best how...

Page 201

...day as if
religion had a greater interest for me; but that interest is still
centred on...

Page 202

...by it; but take it as a rare moment. Usually I hate to
speak of what...

Page 203

...in _Travels with a Donkey_. The late Philip Gilbert
Hamerton, editor of the...

Page 204

...gudgeons, the breast and leg of a partridge, some green peas,
eight crayfish, some Mont d'Or...

Page 205

...smoking a cigar over my
coffee. I came last night from Autun, and I am muddled...

Page 206

...dibbs--a homely fiver. How, and why, do
you continue to exist? I do so ill, but...

Page 207

...you for an introduction to that beautiful--no, that's
not the word--that jolly, with an Arcadian jollity--thing...

Page 208

...devil.

Seriously, you're a cool hand. And then you have the brass to ask me
_why_ "my...

Page 209

...willing, but the d----d flesh cannot, cannot, cannot, see its
way to profit by. I think...

Page 210

...is a hard lot. I should prefer to be a bold
pirate, the gay sailor-boy of...

Page 211

...a paragraph; just, in short, where he ought to be,
to inspire confidence in a wicked...

Page 212

...The landlord's daughter, Miss
Stewart, was present in oil colour; so I wrote her a declaration...

Page 213

...to his chivalrous nature her
circumstances appealed no less than her person; and almost from their
first...

Page 214

...Vendetta in the West_; but this did
not satisfy him, and was never finished. He planned...

Page 215

...for this purpose. Indeed, I have worked like a
horse, and am now as tired as...

Page 216

...flood and field and hill, by wood and meadow fair,
Beside the Susquehannah and...

Page 217

...have a tin wash-bowl among four. I wear nothing but a shirt and a
pair of...

Page 218

...an
oracle.

The business of my life stands pretty nigh still. I work at my notes of
the...

Page 219

... R. L. S.




TO EDMUND GOSSE


_Monterey, 8th...

Page 220

...of approach; I do not know if I am the same man I was in
Europe,...

Page 221

...and then given up and destroyed.


[_Monterey, October 1879._]

MY DEAR HENLEY,--Many...

Page 222

...man three hours to drill them out. Another shot, and
I'd have gone to kingdom come.

This...

Page 223

...now steadily. If I have
to wait another two months, I shall begin to be happy....

Page 224

...that I am not in Edinburgh, as I could perhaps have done
more, and I need...

Page 225

...thousandfold, I should
be tempted to think our life a practical jest in the worst possible
spirit....

Page 226

...of eloquence; indeed, I have sought to be prosaic in view
of the nature of the...

Page 227

...to make a poetry daybreak instead of
sticking to your muttons, and comparing with the mysterious...

Page 228

...in bed. I may be wrong, but if
the niting is to continue, I believe I...

Page 229

... say 280 pp. in all.

Here is my scheme. Henley already...

Page 230

...you were not quite sincere
with yourself: you were seeking arguments to make me devote myself...

Page 231

...Yes, Henley, I can tell you what that is. How old are
all truths, and yet...

Page 232

...it? and I must own the guts are a little knocked out of
me. If I...

Page 233

...morning, a slender
gentleman in an ulster, with a volume buttoned into the breast of it,
may...

Page 234

...sterling. The wine is put down in a
whole bottleful, and it is strange and painful...

Page 235

...my hand, I should feel like a man who
had made half a year's income in...

Page 236

...are two or three objections to
that; but I shall instruct you more at large when...

Page 237

...Don Juan are the two that smile on
me; but I will touch nothing in the...

Page 238

...the
course of next week. And then, I'll stick to stories. I am not
frightened. I know...

Page 239

...DEAR AND KIND WEG,--It was a lesson in philosophy that would have
moved a bear, to...

Page 240

...living, early
to bed though scarce early to rise in proportion (que diable! let us
have style,...

Page 241

...prosperity.--Ever
yours,

R. L. S.




TO PROFESSOR MEIKLEJOHN


One day at...

Page 242

...nor, certainly, George Eliot--no, nor even
Balzac. It is Charles Reade, or old Dumas, or the...

Page 243

...my true method.

(1) As to _Studies_. There are two more already gone to Stephen.
_Yoshida Torajiro_,...

Page 244

...for
_Hester Noble_. Those at the end, Von Rosen and the Princess, the Prince
and Princess, and...

Page 245

...happiness; nor do I mean to. All the
same, I am more and more in a...

Page 246

...may perhaps try to write it better some day; but that is
what I want in...

Page 247

...mountains, a very withered bridegroom. I think your MS.
Bible, if that were a specimen, would...

Page 248

...and one Dr. Bamford (a name
the Muse repels), that I have come out of all...

Page 249

...indeed of my demand for books, for you
have seemingly not yet sent me one. Still,...

Page 250

...past salvation. I think I shall always
think of it as my best work. There is...

Page 251

...the chapter called "Faces on the City Front."

_East Oakland, Cal.,...

Page 252

... [_San Francisco, May 1880._]

MY DEAR COLVIN,--It is a long while since I have heard...

Page 253

...is very clever, very well written, and out of
sight the most inside-out thing in the...

Page 254

...what was to him a very sore grievance. He spoke with anger and
...

Page 255

...despite
her own precarious health, the most devoted and most efficient of
nurses.

From Liverpool the Stevenson party...

Page 256

...and comedies, they had there the great advantage
of the presence, in a neighbouring house, of...

Page 257

...his short stories of Scottish
life and superstition, _Thrawn Janet_ and _The Merry Men_, originally
designed to...

Page 258

...the
spot into the traditions concerning the murder of Campbell of Glenure,
his three resting-places in Scotland...

Page 259

... A further stay at Strathpeffer led to disenchantment, not with
outdoor...

Page 260

...made one die from laughing in a theatre, and provoked a
smile from us even in...

Page 261

... I will be bold and state my view;
It's not a place at...

Page 262

...Smoke with an unperturbed mind.

R. L. S.




TO THOMAS STEVENSON


...

Page 263

...my
conscience. I like Symonds very well, though he is much, I think, of an
invalid in...

Page 264

...an English gun," or--the soldier salute; or for
the heroic apostrophe to Nelson; that ode has...

Page 265

...But there is a fine movement and feeling in the
rest.

We will have the Duke of...

Page 266

...dignity to his existence. And I think
the better of myself for the belief that I...

Page 267

...Usually,
it may freeze, or snow, or do what it pleases, you feel it not, or
hardly...

Page 268

...This, of
course, will cause me a far greater difficulty about authorities; but I
have already learned...

Page 269

...do right than not to do wrong; further, the
one is possible, the other has always...

Page 270

... ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO SIDNEY COLVIN


I did go out to Davos after...

Page 271

...it would be
well for us; although, I suppose--and yet I wonder!--so ill for the poor
mother...

Page 272

...Symonds, and frequent visitor at Davos, was
Mr. Horatio F. Brown, author of...

Page 273

... Moon-seen and merry, under the trellises,
Flush-faced they played with old polysyllables;
...

Page 274

..._piasseur_,
cheerfulest of sylvan creatures, an ideal comic opera in itself. "Come
along, what fun, here's Pan...

Page 275

...made in France--all eagerly burning to write, and all
inflicted with incurable aphasia. I should not...

Page 276

... The Shadow on the Bed.
The Body-Snatchers.
The Case Bottle.
The...

Page 277

...but you were to me, then, only a part of
a mangle through which I was...

Page 278

...testimonial stating all you can in favour of me
and, with your best art, turning the...

Page 279

...years before,
on the same day as R. L. S. himself, and is...

Page 280

...I had something else to say. I am very tedious--it is another
request. In August and...

Page 281

...unkindly haunt "upon the mountains
visitant"--there goes no angel there but the angel of death.[37] The
deaths...

Page 282

...have "no name" as yet--not by Wilkie
Collins.

_Tales for Winter Nights._ Yes, that, I think, we...

Page 283

...have a visit from you. If before
August, here; if later, at Braemar. Tupe!

And now, _mon...

Page 284

..._Tales for Winter Nights_ do?




TO W. E. HENLEY


The spell of good health...

Page 285

...I have written this good
while. I have had a brutal cold, not perhaps very wisely...

Page 286

...myself, even real good. He has also seen and approved one
of Fanny's. It will make...

Page 287

...you say so, some of them would be.

Our difference as to pity I suspect was...

Page 288

...better you ever saw. I have a white hat, it is much
admired; also a plaid,...

Page 289

...to fancy, to our rustic raiment of an evening.

As to that question, I would deal,...

Page 290

...the name of _Routledge_? That's the kind of
man I am, blast your eyes. Two chapters...

Page 291

...DEAR DR. JAPP,--My father has gone, but I think I may take it upon me
to...

Page 292

...pleasant. He told me
much: he is simply the most active young man in England, and...

Page 293

...that of beastly old Braemar.
My doctor sends me skipping. I
Have many...

Page 294

...for, with the following exceptions:--

_Trials of the Sons of Roy Rob with Anecdotes_: Edinburgh, 1818,...

Page 295

...Superior (sic) of the Jesuits, straight out
of Skelt.

And now look here, I had three points:...

Page 296

...or twelve. You had better

--Two days later.

Bunyan skips to-day, pretty bad, always with an official...

Page 297

...give me a testimonial;
in the circumstances he thought it was indelicate. Lest, by some
calamity, you...

Page 298

...through
the big, echoing, college archway, and away south under the street
lamps, and away to dear...

Page 299

...I, with a
twinge of the rheumatiz; and Fanny better than her ordinary.

General conclusion between Lloyd...

Page 300

...bad times in America two strains of unsoundness of mind, the
first, a perpetual fear that...

Page 301

...thing, I am
more and more convinced, without an art, that always waits for us and...

Page 302

...You have no idea what it costs me to
wring out my work now. I have...

Page 303

...David, King of Israel.

3. Poetical Works of Arthur, Iron Dook of Wellington including a Monody
on...

Page 304

...tricked
poor Solomon into his place, and the squire and the parson are hearing
the evidence. Parson...

Page 305

...one advantage--the neighbourhood of J. A. Symonds--I dare say you
know his work, but the man...

Page 306

...my progress.

R. L. S.




TO MRS. GOSSE


Mrs. Gosse...

Page 307

... or
...

Page 308

...with masks and passwords, and I swear on a skull
daily. F. has reread _Treasure I^d._,...

Page 309

...a forgetful rogue, as indeed I am;
for I have but now told my publisher to...

Page 310

...flattered; for this is
_simply the first time he has ever given one away_. I have...

Page 311

...Vernon is almost
as good. The manner and the faults of the book greatly justify
themselves on...

Page 312

...I sufficed for myself indeed.
And I believe I can.

I am still far from satisfied about...

Page 313

...I aaaam a wooooood
engraaaaver. Lloyd then prints 'em: are they not fun? I doat on...

Page 314

...2nd I quite believe that it is better to have everything
brought before one in books....

Page 315

...is your fault if I appear so pulpiteering.

Wishing you well in life and art, and...

Page 316

...a woman's too, although,
for many reasons, it appears somewhat differently with the enslaved sex.
By your...

Page 317

...kind of substantial existence; and
constantly in talk, and occasionally in writing, he...

Page 318

...in _it_." He is seventy-nine! but may well last to a
hundred!--Yours ever,

...