The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 12

By Robert Louis

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... FEBRUARY 27TH, 1757 ...

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...may to some degree find
favour for my story with seafarers and sea-lovers like yourselves._

_And at...

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...be
sure, but--well!--all that's left of it."

"A great deal better than nothing," said the editor. "But...

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...and his old maid sister who lived in the back parts of the house, a
quiet,...

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...are just the three things that I would
rather die than set my hand to. It...

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...Ane to tie and ane to ride.
An ill day for the groom
...

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...was altogether a young nobleman (not yet twenty-four in the year
'Forty-five) who had made a...

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...by many considerable families. But the one dispute
settled, another opened. For my lord, Miss Alison,...

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...piece of gold which had just sent
her lover to the wars, and flung it clean...

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...old lord were true to their
bargain. That ever they accomplished anything is more than I...

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...change-house; and
if they had little left of the guinea, they had less of their wits.
What...

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...if she offered, as she
often did, to let them have her money in a gift,...

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...as he went by, and the women (who are always the
most bold because they are...

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...some
grievance was fermenting, I forget what, if ever I heard: and it was
currently said there...

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...II

SUMMARY OF EVENTS (_continued_)


I made the last of my journey in the cold end of...

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...same plain countenance, only more
subtle and pleasant, and his talk a thousand times more entertaining....

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...saw the free-traders, with a great force of
men and horses, scouring on the beach. Mr....

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...blackened their own faults, and made light
of their own virtues, when they beheld them in...

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...him at a distance.

My old lord was uniformly kind to Mr. Henry; he had even...

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...a little service.
There is a pension we pay; it is John's part to carry it,...

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...out. This was
when she had had enough of me for an audience, and had set...

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...heart was touched for the woman in the beginning."

"Why, there it is, you see!" said...

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...wine to
the chimney-side, and Miss Alison, instead of withdrawing, should bring
a stool to his knee,...

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...more continuity, his eye straying ever and again to the chimney,
and his voice changing to...

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...himself except to me, a sore affront to the major-domo's
consequence.

"Well," said I, smiling a little,...

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...I come bearing letters which I am sure they will be very rejoiced
to have the...

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...be round with you like a soldier," said the
Colonel. "I do."

My lord held out a...

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...now.

"Let me give you a hand to your room," said he to his wife. "This...

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...MASTER'S WANDERINGS

_From the Memoirs of the Chevalier de Burke_


... I left Ruthven (it's hardly necessary...

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...for
courage."

"O, bedad," says I, "I could show you a more unpopular with the naked
eye. And...

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...but newly come to anchor. She was
the _Sainte-Marie-des-Anges_, out of the port of Havre-de-Grace. The
Master,...

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...come; and the
terror of my mind was increased out of all measure by Ballantrae, who
mocked...

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...him; and (not to dwell upon these shocking incidents)
Ballantrae and I and two others were...

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...at the end of
my career, and declare there is not one--no, nor yet life itself--which
is...

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...was just then filling on the new tack; her ensign blew out
quite plain to see;...

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...of you yesterday, when you were wanted; and we did well
without you, let me tell...

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...and down alone into the cabin to face
that drunken savage.

"This is the man for us,"...

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...Besides which, as I was always a creature of
the nicest sensibility, the scenes that must...

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...more than a stock of biscuit or an
anker or two of spirits.

In the meanwhile our...

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...soldier; but he had a quick
perception of the men's wishes, and it was plain this...

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...then
forgetting our quarrels to embrace. Ballantrae had bidden me drink
nothing, and feign drunkenness, as I...

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...they were now all in the one hand; and
yet more amazed (still looking through my...

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...we had been sighted yesterday in the
morning; here were the cruiser's boats to cut us...

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...I think it not wonderful we decided on the active
part.

It was already blistering hot when...

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...He went forward the more
carelessly, I must suppose; for presently we saw him sink a...

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...have been
ashamed; and it was not until I had a share of the rum that...

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...upon the sand. The place where we had slept,
with the packets lying undone and the...

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...the chase, we lay among some bushes on the top of the dune;
and having by...

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...with a good breeze, and
blessing the name of God for our deliverance. Almost in the...

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...from his engagements;
nothing but peril appeared to environ the poor fugitives, and for some
time we...

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...hatchets. It
passed off harmlessly, indeed, as did the rest of our encounters; for
Chew was well...

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...seen us sit down in despair for half an hour at a time without
one word;...

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...our path by obstacles, it was impossible even
to have a guess in what direction we...

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...was certainly a natural occasion; but now here she was named a
second time; and what...

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...the English side," I whispered; "and think! the best we
could then hope is to begin...

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...the more excessive part of his
manners from the first. Even the...

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...and a bitter dogged smile, my zeal quite carried me beyond my
place. "This is midsummer...

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...worse, when he
would not let me go." He poured out another glass of wine, and...

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...and it's the more disgraceful, sir," cries the
Colonel, warming, "because there's not one dirty penny...

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...for his wife he
would sometimes have a sharp retort: perhaps when she had ruffled him
with...

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...indeed, from her former manner of
unconcern and distance. I never had the heart to blame...

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...where his money goes to? his--and yours--and the money
for the very wine he does not...

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...felt he had his wife behind
him for once, and I observed, on the day it...

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...a private hand, some week
or so after the departure of the last messenger.

...

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...the means of ladies; and if all be
true that I have heard,...

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...of this catastrophe, for how long a time, and with how
blind an ignorance of what...

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...in time to see the boat touch. Captain Crail
himself was steering, a thing not usual;...

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...a precisian) it is so I have curtailed my own. Come
now, pick up that, and...

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...pursued me for a step or two, and (I suppose) desisted. One
thing at least is...

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...on the word.

If this speech were anything at all, it was surely a well-deserved
reproof upon...

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...a homely courtliness, that did not
shame but flattered us. All that he did throughout the...

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...true, Henry," says my old lord, with a little frown, a
thing rare with him. "You...

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...chiefly
for this reason, that it had one good result, and gave me the quicker
sense of...

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...solicitude about his
life, blinded them the more effectually to his faults.

It was during this time...

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...his head--was gone sound
asleep. I will not deny I was tempted with the wish to...

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...kissed and
wept upon; and the woman was set up in a public of her own,...

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...at all employed in such a case."

"My father's servants, I believe," said the Master.

"Go to...

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...be sung, I should tell you, by an exile's
sweetheart; and represents perhaps not so much...

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...last of his emotion; for he presently returned and
launched into a disquisition on the nature...

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...it was possible
to break the entail and alienate a piece of land. And to this,...

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...all the man's
business brought to a successful head, and his pockets once more bulging
with our...

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...Henry proposed some very public appearance
for the Master; and my lord, as he had hoped,...

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...by what other channel indulgence can
have flowed on so notorious an offender as myself; for...

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...accomplished nothing. Before a day
or two he had wiped off the ill results of his...

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...white with rime, the sky low and
grey: the sea black and silent like a quarry-hole....

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...appeared to us in the
moment of their birth, and reserve all that I since discovered...

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...a sailor in a tavern. The same dulness, the same petty
greed, _cette lenteur d'hebete qui...

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...I must have blood for this," says the Master.

"Please God it shall be yours," said...

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...a bucket of water; I shook as I went with
more than terror; but my companions,...

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...and before he could move, the sword
was through his body.

I cried out with a stifled...

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...And he fell
suddenly in a seat--my old lord's seat by the chimney-side--and was
shaken with dry...

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...sees me and judges
between us two, I think not always: has his love ever failed...

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...I did not. But when I saw him
fall, if I could have spared one thought...

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...countenance. A partisan I am; partisans we have all been; it is as
a partisan that...

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...father. He was hated in the country,
God knows how unjustly. He had a loveless marriage....

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...with
me.'"

"They have quarrelled?" he said.

I nodded.

"I must fly to them," he said, beginning once again...

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...the overhanging blackness, brighter than by day.
And there was the blood-stain in the midst; and...

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...replied, with a gentle dignity.

At this, for the first time, I was seized with sorrow...

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..."My son!"

With a broken, strangled cry, Mr. Henry leaped up and fell on his
father's neck,...

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...blood marked where the body
must have been infallibly set down to rest the bearers.

The stain...

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...the night before; it was a parting shot, hatred being no
longer checked by policy. And,...

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...and the wind driving in
the bay--and to assure myself that the lugger was gone from...

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...bed. My old lord called from time to time to take the
news, but would not...

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...inheritance of
sorrows, his right memory: I was bound he should be heartily lamented in
the one...

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...EPHRAIM MACKELLAR.


_Schedule of Papers_.

A. Scroll of ten...

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...chimney; amid the smouldering
embers, black ashes of paper fluttered in the draught; and at that...

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...would redound against poor Henry, and I
should see him stoned again upon the streets. Ah!...

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...the former troubles
which had brought it on. Did he remember, and conceal his dreadful
knowledge? or...

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...no man
could say my master had gone at all out of his mind, no man...

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...your hands are clear of blood. I reason from certain
indices; and by these it should...

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...off sleeping and the book roll in the ashes; some
days he would drag his foot,...

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...more difficulty than ever before; and some
time in the night, without any mortal violence, his...

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...son's absence. Was the
child abroad? the father would be watching the clouds in case it...

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...and came presently
into their view. They stood together in the open space where the duel
was,...

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...his head.

"I think you have forgot a word, my lord," said I. "'Forgive us our
trespasses,...

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...was
quite cast out. I have seen him come to the door of a room, look...

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...Time has proved these fears to have been
quite exaggerate. Certainly there is no more worthy...

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...I asked.

"What I am doing?" he repeated; "I was never good at guessing riddles."

"What you...

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...husband? Will
nothing teach you your position in this house? Will you never cease from
making and...

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...without shoes or stockings; my hat
had been struck from my head in the mellay; my...

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...Lord be praised! there are more sorts than the one!"

The cipaye led me forward accordingly...

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...and the value of a gold mohur in small change as
a matter of convenience, bedad,...

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...wickedness, was not without some
natural affection; I believe he was sincerely attached to Mr. Burke...

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...the
other, who was set close to the red embers, and made up into a bundle
like...

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...suddenly shifting my eyes, I was aware of the man himself
standing in the doorway, and,...

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...could bear so violent a strain--his least of all, that was
unhinged already; and I decided...

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..."I am going to be the plain-dealer once more; if for
the last time, so much...

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...he; "but, the Lord
knows, I fear you are speaking very true. I have not proved...

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...a running
motion, as though he had learned again from Mr. Alexander; his face was
drawn; it...

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...fear you now, Mr. Bally; I think even--God forgive me--that I
take a certain pleasure in...

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...has Mr. Bally means?"

"I understand him to have nothing," replied my lord. "I give him...

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...There was some talk of
a woman at St. Bride's, to whom you had behaved extremely...

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...forests of the West, and (since his later
voyage) the ancient cities of the Indies. How...

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...quite settled, as
of a family at home in its paternal seat; and what perturbation may...

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...and the thing was over; the horses broke into a trot, the
lamplight sped like Will-o'-the-Wisp...

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...friend Mr. Dass are now all the company," I replied.
"My lord, my lady, and the...

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...my orders, Mr. Bally," said I.

"Profoundly modest," said the Master; "perhaps not equally ingenuous.
You told...

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...say, in each
other's bosoms; and those of the Indian troubled me with a certain
changing brightness,...

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...of our good talks." And, indeed, meal-time
at Durrisdeer must have been a delight to any...

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...to accompany us on our flank
march; I have enough for Secundra and myself, but not...

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...the wind among the turret-tops, and the perpetual trepidation of the
masoned house, sleep fled my...

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...regret?"

"I do not think you could be so bad a man," said I, "if you...

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...a natural
slumber without dreams. Yet I must have been at work even in the deepest
of...

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...of forbearance; in our worst days displayed the most
patient geniality, holding me in conversation as...

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...company,
which obliged him to confront and tolerate my unconcealed aversion.
Certain, at least, that he loved...

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...could bear all and more, if the _Nonesuch_
carried down with her, overtook by the same...

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...keep, the watchmen watch in vain'!"

I was abashed by the captain's error; abashed, also, by...

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...with both hands to the grating of the cabin skylight; for
it struck me it was...

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...which lies
about Rome. On the one hand was an ancient Roman tomb; on the other...

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...the place meant
death to the first comer, and groped out of the catacomb like a...

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...least attention, leaning the while upon the rail
and looking down intently in the water. And...

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...he was a gentleman of
family: and the Lord deliver you, Mackellar, from an enemy so...

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...of the conscientious. Take time to
meditate."

With that he made off up the sliding deck like...

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...I mean otherwise. I mean, had I met you in my
youth. You are to consider...

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...for a light
upon his character.

"You are very like a civilian to think war consists in...

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...me with a word!" said he. "You
said the other day that I relied on your...

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...to bid you farewell," said he, "and that for ever. For now you
go among my...

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...it was, another Albanian. No
one here will be surprised if I deny him my door;...

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...the money you withhold from me, you do it as
a thief, a perjurer, and a...

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...shame, for it is mine already--like the
shirt upon your back; and I choose to stay...

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...the town, a lonely, small house of
boards, overhung with some acacias. It was furnished in...

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...father should have left her such a
paradise. She had looked on from a window upon...

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...that gave him healthful colours. Some moralists
might have been relieved by the discovery; I confess...

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...the Master accepted with
a steady countenance; what was in his mind, God knows, or perhaps...

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...was a hard smile upon his
face, but he uttered nothing.

"Henry," said the Master, with a...

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...than yourself.
I ask service, loyal service; not that you should make and mar behind my
back,...

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...me,
"you think of me more than you suppose. 'And I wonder at it too,'" he
added,...

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...both
these brothers into savage and wintry deserts, there to die. But such a
thought was distant...

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...he is."

"I will, then, despatch this letter, my lady, and return here, if you
please, to...

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...himself in.

The note was addressed to one Captain Harris, at a tavern on the
port-side. I...

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...read all I could find, and they
were all extremely insignificant, and of the usual kind...

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...late
when I came home, and there was my lord making up his portmanteau for a
voyage.

"Why...

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...sure enough, the next day there fell a sprinkle even in Albany; but
it passed as...

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...am still
strong to justify my course. My lord had carried with him several
introductions to chief...

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...more upon my guard."

"That is what I would ask of you," I replied. "You are...

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...of music, his brother had all the
graces of the family, so that when I say...

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...the passionate, not for my master alone,
but for the sons of man.

At this I leaped...

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...What to tell my lady, and in what words, and how far to be false
and...

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...I have heard him more than
once express a sense of intimidation. "I have come too...

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...that pain kept me wakeful; and I was afoot again before
the peep of day, crouching...

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...others, Mountain himself, two Scotsmen--Pinkerton
and Hastie--and a man of the name of Hicks, a drunken...

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...the position. If
Secundra Dass knew and concealed his knowledge of English, Harris was a
proficient in...

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...his recapturers as for a
service, and rejoined the caravan with all his usual gallantry and
cheerfulness...

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...was observed
that he had also eaten with unusual heartiness, and drank deep,
doubtless from design.

At least,...

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...the Master
sat. It is possible Mountain may have made a rustle, it is certain, at
least,...

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...the gentleman had to say." The Master had not
flinched before their onslaught; nor, at this...

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...and gulping,
a detected thief!" Thence, having made this happy impression, he
explained how he had escaped,...

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...treasure? They had heard a vast of words;
but the truth was just this, that Mr....

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...to his side, and inquired
most anxiously if he had any skill in medicine. As a...

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...was over; and before ten, the
Indian, with a link stuck in the ground, was toiling...

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...(it was Hicks the shoemaker) slept on the
lee side of the circle, something farther off...

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...God so, I believe so, I dare to believe so," Mountain had
replied almost with incoherence,...

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...and would fall into a
deep consideration, his head bowed in his hands, his foot patting...

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...the dressing of some cruel frost-bites.

For a moment my lord seemed at a full stop;...

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...a kind of
melancholy composure, and his time of aberration seemed to pass away.
"You can ask...

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...returned
Sir William. "I desire simply to be quit of you; and to that effect, I
put...

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... * * ...

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...The camp was on high
ground, overlooking a frozen lake, perhaps a mile in its longest
measurement;...

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...so engaged in my own bosom, when a sound broke suddenly upon
the night. It was...

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...top of the ascent, a bird or two winged aloft and hovered darkly in
the moonlight;...

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...by now my lord had
stepped beside Sir William; the moon shone fair upon his face,...

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...delicate fingers,
breathing with puffed lips; and when he moved aside, I beheld the face
of the...

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... * * ...

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... ______

...