The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 13

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...Transcriber's notes:

Fixed typographical error: In page 427 "that he returned somehow to
...

Page 1

... 43

IV. IN WHICH I...

Page 2

...IN WHICH I TURN SMUGGLER, AND THE CAPTAIN CASUIST 251

XVII. LIGHT...

Page 3

...three o'clock of a winter's afternoon in Tai-o-hae, the
French capital and port of entry of...

Page 4

...of that island princess for the love
of whom he had submitted his body to the...

Page 5

...the store, anyway, Tom," observed a gentlemanly German.
"_Bon jour, mon Prince!_" he added, as a...

Page 6

...same
placid, fresh-looking Britisher."

"I can't return the compliment; for you seem to have become a Britisher
yourself,"...

Page 7

...it my partner's, and cry quits," returned Loudon, getting
nonchalantly down the side.

Havens followed and took...

Page 8

...exchanged and debated. To a stranger,
this conversation will at first seem scarcely brilliant but he...

Page 9

...and called it after the
ship."

"Yes, there's something in wrecks sometimes," said the Glasgow voice;
"but not...

Page 10

...pleasantly.
"Well, no; he's a man of rather large sympathies."

"If you're done talking nonsense, Loudon," said...

Page 11

...Dodd, not as he told it to his friend,
but as he subsequently wrote it.




THE YARN

CHAPTER...

Page 12

...in you. Blood will tell, and you will come right in
time. I am not afraid...

Page 13

...the beginning. It was cold-drawn gambling, without colour or
disguise. Just that which is the impediment...

Page 14

...in mind that the real profit
is in the book-keeping. I trust, Dodd, to be able...

Page 15

...and the clerk who was brought back to keep
my books, spare me all work, and...

Page 16

...the
first move in a considerable deal. That evening, at least, the name of
H. Loudon Dodd...

Page 17

...your own good, and I will offer you a
bargain. I start you again next term...

Page 18

...was making arrangements to have a finger in most of the contracts.
Competitive plans had been...

Page 19

...be sold for, currency. Unsuccessful
speculators were thus always selling clothes, books, banjos, and
sleeve-links, in order...

Page 20

...hanging
between two minds, Fortune suddenly stepped in, and Muskegon State
capitol reversed my destiny.

"Loudon," said my...

Page 21

...titter joyously. Repeated
receptions of this sort must be at the root, I suppose, of what...

Page 22

...was rude, broad, and
dragging. Take him at his best, and even when he could be...

Page 23

...answered (I
believe) to the name of Molesworth, and was his constant
pocket-companion, would draw up rough...

Page 24

...own
incommunicable satisfaction. Some of us went far, and some farther. I
always looked with awful envy...

Page 25

...remembered it was a
wine I had never tasted, ordered a bottle, found it excellent, and...

Page 26

...on my chimney-piece to
have stopped, I decided to go downstairs again and give directions to
the...

Page 27

...began to lose my
temper. At this juncture I perceived a filtering of light along the
floor,...

Page 28

...The
ocean might dry up, the rocks melt in the sun, the stars fall from
heaven like...

Page 29

...Thus it was that I came face to
face with my third destiny, for my career...

Page 30

...of the studios at that date, the
hazing of new pupils was both barbarous and obscene....

Page 31

...I found myself near the studio of a
young Frenchman whose work I had promised to...

Page 32

...say to him?" he asked.

"The only thing that he could feel," was my reply.

After this...

Page 33

...he supposed to be the
natural thoughts and to contain the whole duty of the born...

Page 34

...But it
wasn't that. I just said to myself, 'What is most wanted in my age...

Page 35

...whole soul into it too. You mustn't think the time is lost. It's all
culture; it...

Page 36

...knees was winged, to
indicate our soaring future; and her seat was a medley of sculptured
fragments,...

Page 37

...a holiday for
the readers of a Sunday paper. Night had fallen over the Genius of
Muskegon...

Page 38

...him, and I walked out of that office with the contract in
my pocket, and did...

Page 39

...I
cannot but reflect with delight and gratitude how very few youths of
your age occupy nearly...

Page 40

...was tramping around with my tin-types to
find a column and a half of real, cultured...

Page 41

...life and fortune against untoward
chances, returning at night, from a day of ill-starred shifts and
ventures,...

Page 42

...for the intimacy was already far advanced. I had a genuine and
lively taste for my...

Page 43

...more advanced
than the Red Indians of "Fennimore Cooperr"; and it took all our talents
combined to...

Page 44

...shore
again. He at least could understand; but to Pinkerton, I think the
noise, the wine, the...

Page 45

...the most of us away. The two Frenchmen, indeed, retired
scoffing to their bock, and Romney,...

Page 46

...ever I
supposed. I'll write to-night."

"O, you're a pretty decent sort yourself," returned Myner, with more
than...

Page 47

...myself, I was able to rejoice that my father had been taken
from the battle. I...

Page 48

...in the
commercial college.

"Pinkerton," I said, "can't you understand that, as long as I was there,
I...

Page 49

...out of my head that it's a man's duty to die
rich, if he can."

"What for?"...

Page 50

...a plain piece of business," said he;
"it's done every day; it's even typical. How are...

Page 51

...theatre-doors, Sunday cabfuls of second-rate
pleasure-seekers, the bedizened ladies of the pavement, the show in the
jewellers'...

Page 52

...beheld (in imagination) myself,
the waggoner, and the Genius of Muskegon, standing in the public view...

Page 53

...sharply is he set on dainties. The last of my ready cash,
about thirty francs, was...

Page 54

...remarked, and the boarder who
misses a meal is sure to be accused of infidelity. On...

Page 55

...my answer," and I made as if to go,
rage boiling in my heart.

"Of course you...

Page 56

...fare and expenses to
Muskegon (if I have the name right), where your father lived, where...

Page 57

...muddy roadway and blank wall--I sat down to wrestle with my
misery. The weather was cheerless...

Page 58

...a muddy cab-rank, on the shores of a wide thoroughfare of mud,
offering (to fancy) a...

Page 59

...(fast as my trembling legs could carry me) round the corner to
the Cafe de Cluny....

Page 60

...but highly patriotic
"Standard Bearer" for the Salon; whither it was duly admitted, where it
stood the...

Page 61

...about to commend my resolution
and press me to remain in Paris. "Only remember, Loudon," he...

Page 62

...thought of Pinkerton
waiting for me, as I knew, with unwearied affection, and regarding me
with a...

Page 63

...am conscious that I behaved all through that
breakfast like a whipped schoolboy.

At length, the meal...

Page 64

...at the right time. In my old firm there is a
vacancy; they call themselves Italian...

Page 65

...has anything to say, let him say it. It's me that has the
money here; and,...

Page 66

...Adam to the servant; "go over to the
garden, and if Mr. Gregg the lawyer is...

Page 67

...it: in concession to which
weakness, it was agreed that I should call in about an...

Page 68

...be a prince and
millionaire in that thrifty Latin Quarter. I think I had the grace,...

Page 69

...and of the cabman's eating-house, brought tears to
my eyes. The whole monotonous Babel had grown--or,...

Page 70

...changed trains at Council Bluffs, I
was aware of a man appearing at the end of...

Page 71

...plunge into
this fiery fluid; "and what does 'Warranted Entire' mean?"

"Why, Loudon, you ought to know...

Page 72

...the very thought of whom, my
spirit shrank instinctively.

Well, I was in for it--in for Pinkerton,...

Page 73

...fear the worst, and
even personal indignity, when all at once the humour of the thing...

Page 74

...chemical elements,
variously disguised, support all mortals. A brief study of Pinkerton in
his new setting convinced...

Page 75

...to sea again under aliases, and
continued to stem the waves triumphantly enough under the colours...

Page 76

...bottles of Courvoisier. I used
to twit my friend with this resemblance, and propose a new...

Page 77

...my first duties to
review and criticise. Some of them were villainous, yet all were
saleable. I...

Page 78

...fly-paper
for these busybodies. I have seen them blankly turn the crank of it for
five minutes...

Page 79

...always delighted to patronise native industries," said Norton the
First. "San Francisco is public-spirited in what...

Page 80

...to profit by what was not forced on my attention,
rather than seek scenes; Pinkerton quite...

Page 81

...once more; give me your hand--you've saved me again. I must
do something to rouse the...

Page 82

...boss word,' I said. 'Before you're very much older, I'll
have you in type as long...

Page 83

...had been shepherded on board, and the
inevitable belated two or three had gained the deck...

Page 84

...here and
pilot me."

I do, pointing with my wand. I do pilot him, to the inexpressible
entertainment...

Page 85

...day's takings in a bag.

What I have here sketched was the routine. But we appealed...

Page 86

...least considerable. The
first was my terror of the hobble-dehoy girls, to whom (from the
demands of...

Page 87

...I did not
like to lose my own money; I hated to lose Pinkerton's; and the...

Page 88

...the centre of a sympathetic group. "For fifteen
year I've been at ut," she was lamenting...

Page 89

...assessment."

By the end of the year, therefore, this is how I stood. I had made

...

Page 90

... 4,000
...

Page 91

...old man--brace up!" said I.

But when we reached Mamie's boarding-house, it was almost with tears
that...

Page 92

...wished him to be sure; for my life was
wasting in my hands. I was like...

Page 93

...and Pinkerton so proud of my triumph, so happy in
my happiness, in so warm a...

Page 94

...looker-on, to have the matter end ingloriously without the
firing of a shot or the hanging...

Page 95

...and the hugest smelting-pot of races and
the precious metals. She keeps, besides, the doors of...

Page 96

...sides of it, was tightly packed, and growled with
traffic. To-day, I do not doubt the...

Page 97

...tearing up the steps, and I could see
that both were too well dressed to be...

Page 98

...for him that he had been
thus speedy; for when word began to go abroad among...

Page 99

...so long accustomed to the cruelty
of sea discipline that his stories (told perhaps with a...

Page 100

...Francisco, but perhaps better known by
his picturesque Chinese nickname of the Blind White Devil. "The...

Page 101

...me cruising through the isles of paradise, some
force external to myself must be exerted; Destiny...

Page 102

...sympathy by
enunciating the sentiment, "Damn all these Admiralty Charts, and that's
what I say!" From the...

Page 103

...whole
pile of 'em on a reef in the middle of the Pacific."

"Why, Jim, you miserable...

Page 104

... six o'clock. John Wallen, a native of Finland, and Charles Holdorsen,
a...

Page 105

...event of a heavy N.W.
gale, might last until next winter.

"You will never...

Page 106

...this public auction conducted
in a subterranean vault? Could a plain citizen--myself, for
instance--come and see?"

"O, everything's...

Page 107

...like one conscious of great resolves.

"Well?" I asked.

"Well," said he, "it might be better, and...

Page 108

...three minutes the pipe
of the charmer. "Fine brig--new copper--valuable fittings--three fine
boats--remarkably choice cargo--what the auctioneer...

Page 109

...Pinkerton was again facing the
auctioneer.

"Two hundred dollars," said Jim.

"And fifty," said the enemy.

"This looks lively,"...

Page 110

...spectators, and even Bellairs, all well
aware that Mr. Longhurst was the principal, and Jim but...

Page 111

...royal. We were surrounded by a crowd that looked on
wondering, and when Pinkerton had offered...

Page 112

...did the fifty business. But
by this time our idea had gone abroad. I could hear...

Page 113

...wreck. Do you make any advance on fifty
thousand?"

"I have the honour to explain to you,...

Page 114

...higher
powers I am still a free man. Walking this way, Mr. Dodd? I'll walk
along with...

Page 115

...'Frisco; and in
that case--here we go round again in the vicious circle--Bellairs would
not have been...

Page 116

...gone, obsequiously bowing as he
passed.

And now a madcap humour came upon me. It was plain...

Page 117

...the marble pavement of
the hall, a prey to the most wretched anxiety and penitence. The...

Page 118

...in the deal;
it's not that; it's these ninety-day bills, and the strain I've given
the credit--for...

Page 119

..."Yes--and why shouldn't he?" said I. "Is that
the line?"

"That's the line, Loudon Dodd," assented Jim....

Page 120

...all our lives! However," he broke off suddenly,
"we must try the safe thing first. Here's...

Page 121

...do next," said I.

"Guess we sail right in," returned Jim, and suited the action to...

Page 122

...light up for a moment, and then, at the
sound of Jim's proviso, miserably fade. "I...

Page 123

...timidly, "what was it? I would like to know."

The note of timidity offended me like...

Page 124

...passengers?" I asked.

"Dickson is such a blamed common name," returned Jim; "and then, as like
as...

Page 125

...the machine) to
be my helper.

"Captain Trent of the wreck? O yes, Mr. Dodd, he left...

Page 126

...papers in,
but never appeared in person before the authorities.

"Have you a telephone laid on to...

Page 127

...he was addressing; but a head, presumably
the cook's, appeared in answer at the galley door.

"In...

Page 128

...The table had been thrust
upon one side; a South Sea merchant was discoursing music from...

Page 129

...indorsation clinched the proposal; Johnson agreed to produce
Nares before six the following morning; and Black...

Page 130

... |
| ...

Page 131

...of our business, Pinkerton could do a thing
of that kind at a figure extremely reduced;...

Page 132

...for me now.
I'm going right down to-night to break it to her. I think that's...

Page 133

...once in my life played
the man throughout. At the same time I could have desired...

Page 134

...know you
well by reputation."

Perhaps, under the circumstances of the moment, this was scarce a
welcome speech....

Page 135

...sooner I
get that schooner outside the Farallones the better you'll be pleased."

"You're the man I...

Page 136

...at sea," said I.

"Say what you like," exclaimed Pinkerton, "it was a good hour we...

Page 137

...clover, and I'm blamed if I can see what I've done to
deserve it."

So he poured...

Page 138

...of ornament, only a
glass-rack, a thermometer presented "with compliments" of some
advertising whisky-dealer, and a swinging...

Page 139

...to rely wholly upon temperament; for I could not perceive him
to cast one glance on...

Page 140

...windows; and my present, thus intemperately chosen, was
graciously accepted. I believe, indeed, that was the...

Page 141

...miniature craft was
pointed out to her; and then, on second thought, she turned to the...

Page 142

...then some kind of missionary bug,
wanting to work his passage to Raiatea or somewhere. I...

Page 143

...board, the
men had returned to their labours, the captain to his solitary cigar;
and after that...

Page 144

...to sit at home, to study the calendar, and
to wait. I knew, besides, another thing...

Page 145

...after day the air had the same
indescribable liveliness and sweetness, soft and nimble, and cool...

Page 146

...unconsenting fondness. Lastly, the faults were all
embraced in a more generous view; I saw them...

Page 147

...but I was always
pretty good to the old lady." Since then he had prospered, not
uneventfully,...

Page 148

...one half of us
butchered in a mutiny and the rest suffer on the gallows. And...

Page 149

...a caution; there was nothing fit to
put your lips to but the lime-juice, which was...

Page 150

...you'd have got more
than this. And I want no more of your language on deck....

Page 151

...looking
upon the world at large, and the life of a sailor in particular, with so
constant...

Page 152

...lay our course; we had been doing
over eight since nine the night before, and I...

Page 153

...supercargo."

"Captain," I returned, with my heart in my mouth, "risk is better than
certain failure."

"Life is...

Page 154

...and sat in the bench corner,
giddy, dumb, and stupefied with terror. The frightened leaps of...

Page 155

...for all we're
worth. We'll make it to-morrow about four, or not, as the case may...

Page 156

...since the next eye to behold that sheet of
paper might be the eye of an...

Page 157

...I
recalled that apparition. There was no sign of any land; the wreck stood
between sea and...

Page 158

...by far the largest.
With singular scintillations, this vortex of winged life swayed to and
fro in...

Page 159

...immobility of the lagoon
had wrought strange distress among my nerves: I could not hold still
whether...

Page 160

...were aware of a
litter of kegs in the waist; and these, on being somewhat cleaned,
proved...

Page 161

...no
doubt, for somebody at home--perhaps in Hull, of which Trent had been a
native and his...

Page 162

...urgent,
'The berth you're now in is not safe'; or what do you say to PQH?--'Tell
my...

Page 163

...another on the main hatch, I won't deny,"
admitted Nares, "but I can't see what she...

Page 164

...proper
style. I just want to put your mind at rest; you shall have no trouble
with...

Page 165

...birds
showed where the men were still (with sailor-like insatiability)
collecting eggs. And right before us, in...

Page 166

...is sliced short off
with the cold steel. This won't do at all for the men,"...

Page 167

...hurry, and bewilderment; sweat pouring from the face
like rain, the scurry of rats, the choking...

Page 168

...what seemed an ostentation of delay. Me and my
impatience it would appear he had forgotten;...

Page 169

...even the gloomy countenance of the
captain at my elbow, all vanished from the field of...

Page 170

...other chests, as I have said
already, we had found gaping open, and their contents scattered...

Page 171

...this
paper appeared in New South Wales, this ship we're standing in heaved
her blessed anchors out...

Page 172

...landsmen take about ships. A society actress don't
go around more publicly than what a ship...

Page 173

...is usual with Findlay, and all marked and scribbled over with
corrections and additions--several books of...

Page 174

...was
out of the mercantile library of San Francisco. Looks as if he had
brought her here...

Page 175

...play it
mair. O my lamb, come home to me, I'm all by my lane now."...

Page 176

...the card directed me to a
smallish, wizened man, with bushy eyebrows and full white beard,...

Page 177

...that figured."

"Does it explain anything?" I asked.

"It would explain everything," Nares replied, "but for the
steam-crusher....

Page 178

...pass and disappear. The
eternal life of man, spent under sun and rain and in rude...

Page 179

...the end and object of our arduous devastation. In this
perpetual disappointment, my courage did not...

Page 180

...was his reply. "However, they are all the men you've got,
and you're the supercargo."

This, from...

Page 181

...mat lice; sixty ton litty mat lice. I think
all-e-time perhaps plenty opium plenty litty mat...

Page 182

...and slung at his
feet, among the rice, a papered tin box.

"How's that?" he shouted.

A cry...

Page 183

...There is no language to express the stupor with
which I contemplated this result.

It may be...

Page 184

...And we've fetched through without a word of disagreement. I
don't say this to praise myself:...

Page 185

...you in a business sense," the captain agreed;
"and I'm pleased you take that view, for...

Page 186

...the very thing that tells the story.
What's that to me? you may ask, and why...

Page 187

...at least, so sunk in sadness
that I scarce remarked where I was going; and chance...

Page 188

...of a distant steamer. With the
fading out of that last vestige, the _Norah Creina_ passed...

Page 189

...the town of Honolulu advertises itself to the seaward. Presently a
ruddy star appeared inshore of...

Page 190

...read
these letters."

They demurred a little, and indeed the danger of delay seemed obvious;
but the sight...

Page 191

...thing together.
But it just slowly crumbled; Bradley was the last kick, but...

Page 192

...then these words had been scored through and my distressed friend
turned to...

Page 193

...and live on the interest
of our money. No more work for me....

Page 194

...them both in silence. I think shame to have
shown at so great length the half-baked...

Page 195

...me to
express an opinion, in which I may be quite wrong, but to which I...

Page 196

...got to figure how you would like it if he came to
die. Remember, the risk...

Page 197

...clear case it
makes. Your ten thousand is a sop; and people will only wonder you...

Page 198

...we were done had
grown to regard me with an esteem akin to worship. This proud...

Page 199

...I remember to have remarked an ugly-horned reptile of a
modern warship in the usual moorings...

Page 200

...houses. Here I enjoyed some pictures of the native life:
wide-eyed, naked children, mingled with pigs;...

Page 201

...on whom I thus entered unexpectedly: the look-out man,
with grizzled beard, keen seaman's eyes, and...

Page 202

...idea, for the creature (who seemed to be unique, or
to represent a type like that...

Page 203

...next after Trent come him as was
mate."

"Goddedaal!" I exclaimed.

"And a good name for him too,"...

Page 204

...There was one
'Ardy there: colonial born he was, and had been through a power of
money....

Page 205

...I excused
myself with Mr. Fowler, returned to Honolulu, and passed the remainder
of the day hanging...

Page 206

...of paper thus inscribed:--

_Norris Carthew,
...

Page 207

...blackguard-looking boat's crew from the
_Norah Creina_ conveyed me under the guns of the _Tempest_.

The ward-room...

Page 208

...guess that I know much. How are we to stand
to one another? and how am...

Page 209

...a sense of the rugged conviction and judicial emphasis
of Dr. Urquart's speech. To those who...

Page 210

...who had once rejoiced
in his day's employment, like a horse among pastures, now sat staring...

Page 211

...I don't seem to catch on to that
story, Loudon."

"The devil you don't!" thinks I to...

Page 212

...of you
working all day like a common labourer, with your hands bleeding and
your nails broken--and...

Page 213

...spirit; described
the island and the wreck, mimicked Anderson and the Chinese, maintained
the suspense.... My pen...

Page 214

...returned the lady. "He dare not deny it, besides. And this
is not the first time...

Page 215

...I will give you the truth for once. Mr. Dodd, you have been
bought and sold."

"Mamie,"...

Page 216

...know it's all right. I know your
sterling character; but you didn't, somehow, make out to...

Page 217

...now; 'and high time too,' he once
added with characteristic asperity. He was...

Page 218

...courtier
of the lasses in the hawthorn den, perhaps a rustic dancer on the green,
who had...

Page 219

...safe in Callao, I
might approach my creditors with a good grace; and, properly handled by
a...

Page 220

...killed me this afternoon when Mamie
was treating you so, and my conscience was telling me...

Page 221

...I made out you were only a kind of clerk that I
called a partner just...

Page 222

...The field of his ambition was quite
closed; he was done with action, and looked forward...

Page 223

...dead and buried. Amen! say I."

"I don't know that, Mr. Dodd; and to tell you...

Page 224

...I was Mr. Dickson's confidential agent," he explained. "You
had his address, Mr. Dodd. We were...

Page 225

...other hand, was a man with a
secret--rich, terrified, practically in hiding--who had been willing to
pay...

Page 226

...the stair, and
the board was down.

"Lawyer Bellairs?" said the old woman; "gone East this morning....

Page 227

...found.

And for all that, I was close on the heels of an absurd adventure. My
neighbour...

Page 228

...we accuse him of designs; and I
took an early opportunity to go forward and see...

Page 229

...he an author of distinction? Has he written
other works?"

Such was our first interview, the first...

Page 230

...early years was the model for a
good story-book. His landlady's daughter was his bane. He...

Page 231

...replied. "The world is
very hard; I have found it bitter hard myself--bitter hard to live....

Page 232

...I blush when I recall it.

We reached Liverpool one forenoon, the rain falling thickly and
insidiously...

Page 233

...if I seem to press the subject," he continued; "but if you
think my life erroneous,...

Page 234

...surprised to see a centurion coming up the street with a
fatigue draft of legionaries. In...

Page 235

...circumstances and when I
returned, the man was gone. The waiter told me he had left...

Page 236

...my room I saw (in a flash)
that which I ought to have done long ago,...

Page 237

...say we had been almost intimate.
Under the impulse of instinctive sympathy, I have bared my...

Page 238

...yet I would not
willingly have you starve."

"Give me a hundred dollars then, and be done...

Page 239

...bill
unpaid. I did not need to inquire where he was gone, I knew too well,...

Page 240

...of minted gold, and was maintained in order by so great a company
of emulous servants....

Page 241

...see the peacocks and the
Raphaels--for these commonplace people actually possessed two
Raphaels,--to risk life and limb...

Page 242

...believe
none of our western friends ever were in England. Who can this person
be? He couldn't--no,...

Page 243

...and fell out or something; her ladyship took on most
painful: it was like old days,...

Page 244

...Bellairs. That he had got the address, I was quite certain;
that he had not got...

Page 245

...the cloven foot began to
show; he proved to be no Carthew, developed a taste for...

Page 246

...money-box, and an American gold dollar which I happened to find
in my pocket, I bought...

Page 247

...welcome proposition. If the
gentleman was really interested in stamps, she said, probably supposing
me a monomaniac...

Page 248

...out to me; it seemed familiar too; and yet for some
time I could not bridge...

Page 249

...asked.

"Youth, Dodd, youth; blooming, conscious youth," he returned. "Such a
gang, such reptiles! to think we...

Page 250

...a
succeeding generation, not better and not worse. It was to one of these
I was directed:...

Page 251

...was on the door; now we were to meet; now I was to learn at...

Page 252

...told me."

"Dodd, of San Francisco," I continued. "Late of Pinkerton and Dodd."

"Montana Block, I think?"...

Page 253

...sure!" cried I. "I never thought of that. What could they
make of it?"

"Nothing," replied Carthew....

Page 254

...dog. He took his position with seriousness, even with pomp; the
long rooms, the silent servants,...

Page 255

...many sports; and his singular melancholy
detachment gave him a place apart. He set a fashion...

Page 256

...case perfectly justified, and
to which Norris paid no regard. He had been unfairly treated over...

Page 257

...recourse to the lawyer who paid him his allowance.

"Try to remember that my time is...

Page 258

...bitter
phrase--skulked, and chewed grass, and looked on. Day passed, the light
died, the green and leafy...

Page 259

...warn him that he might not always be so
fortunate.

"They're a dyngerous lot of people about...

Page 260

...section made his
rounds with words of encouragement, hearty and rough and well suited to
his men....

Page 261

...a pride, in his plebeian tasks.

The press of work was still at its highest when...

Page 262

...clothes, with a bundle on his shoulder and his
accumulated wages in his pocket, he entered...

Page 263

...three months out
of twelve; the rest of the year he passed in retreat among the...

Page 264

...they?"

"That's what Hallam would call feudal retainers," explained Hadden, not
without vainglory. "They're My Followers. They...

Page 265

...unsound; and he was at times
altogether thrown out by the capricious starlings of the prophet's...

Page 266

...mate was
killed--the famous "outrage on the brig _Jolly Roger_"; but the
treacherous savages made little by...

Page 267

...from
the heights of moral indignation.

"I beg your pardon," he said once. "I am a gentleman,...

Page 268

...was not much, perhaps he regarded his remarks as a
form of courtly badinage. But there...

Page 269

...a good captain to sail your ship
for you. Well, here I am. I've sailed schooners...

Page 270

...want her bigger. A hundred and ninety, going
two hundred," replied the captain. "She's fully big...

Page 271

...were in the colony, and even then I stretched a
point. This time, by your own...

Page 272

...get my instructions changed, and I will change my behaviour.
Not otherwise."

"I am very fond of...

Page 273

...up; all Grant Sanderson's old canvas had been
patched together into one decently serviceable suit of...

Page 274

...fitted for a traderoom with rude
shelves. And the life they led in that anomalous schooner...

Page 275

...long
ago consumed, and that she was only glued together by the rust. "You
shouldn't make me...

Page 276

...air, and expressed an
unrealised ideal. Or perhaps, of all his experiences, this of the
_Currency Lass_,...

Page 277

...by then. But now I'm the soberest man in all Big Muggin."

"It won't do," retorted...

Page 278

...two orders, follow mine, not his. Set the
cook for'ard with the heads'ls, and the two...

Page 279

...all paid back;
in thirty days' cruise we've paid for the schooner and the trade. Heard
ever...

Page 280

...hand. This was the boatswain of the _Leslie_. He had been on bad
terms with his...

Page 281

...indeed,
often; "I'm rather a voilent man," he would say, not without pride; but
this was the...

Page 282

...these explanations it will be sufficient to say that they
were all different, and none satisfactory;...

Page 283

...coast and an Old Bob Ridley of a surf on. The natives
hailed 'em from fishing-boats,...

Page 284

...and
chronometer; nor did Hemstead forget the banjo or a pinned handkerchief
of Butaritari shells.

It was about...

Page 285

...the new blow was less magnanimously borne, and many angry glances
rested on the captain.

Yet it...

Page 286

...this was not at all the feeling of the partners, who rose, clambered
down the isle,...

Page 287

...True, every one was perhaps glad
when silence succeeded that all too appropriate music; true, Mac's
apology...

Page 288

...one that would not bear consideration. The boat voyage
having been tacitly set aside, the desperate...

Page 289

...of flesh, handle it in the hard coin, mark it for his own, and stand
forth...

Page 290

...clinked on the green board. "Good God!" he
thought, "am I gambling again?" He looked the...

Page 291

...from me. But I t'ought it was in fun; that was my mistake,
ye see; and...

Page 292

...on
your guard; you must be very careful, or we shall see you here again."
In the...

Page 293

...to and deny it. Now, suppose she was fishy; suppose it was
some kind of a...

Page 294

...stream her with a
line astern."

"Ay, ay, sir!" from Goddedaal.

"What the devil's wrong?" asked Wicks.

"Nothing, I...

Page 295

...strength. Dinner was served on
deck, the officers messing aft under the slack of the spanker,...

Page 296

...an articulate reply.

"Well," continued Trent, making bread pills and looking hard at the
middle of the...

Page 297

...what I care."

"It's more than your blooming brig's worth!" cried Wicks.

"It's my price anyway," returned...

Page 298

...out the brains of Hemstead.
He turned from one to another, menacing and trumpeting like a...

Page 299

...Tommy, with a sudden clamour of weeping, begged
for his life. "One man can't hurt us,"...

Page 300

...the dark, and shook each other with their shaking. The
dusk continued to fall; and there...

Page 301

...stood swaying at the break of the poop,
and the lantern, which he still carried, swung...

Page 302

...glanced guiltily aside; and Carthew fled from the eye of
his accomplice, and stood leaning on...

Page 303

...a bucket and swab and the
steward's sponge, and began to cleanse the field of battle,...

Page 304

...don't think of it at all," said Wicks. "We've a smart-looking brig
under foot; that's all...

Page 305

...towed her out. But these reasons sufficed, and
the most he could do was to take...

Page 306

...to show between the flanking breakers on the
reef; bit by bit, on the starboard bow,...

Page 307

...soon be down. We may get into all kinds of fresh mess
in the dark and...

Page 308

...time of the sunset, and not long after the
five castaways--castaways once more--lay down to sleep.

Day...

Page 309

...the compass. "Squall out of
nor'-nor'west-half-west; blew hard; every one in a mess, falls jammed,
and Holdorsen...

Page 310

...hurried below with Carthew
at his heels.

The logs were found in the main cabin behind the...

Page 311

...muse, his eye veiled, his mouth partly open. The job was yet
scarce done when he...

Page 312

...desert; but you fooled me and stuck to the brig.
That'll make your lying come easier."

The...

Page 313

...and Hadden burst
into a storm of tears, sobbing aloud as he heaved upon the tackle....

Page 314

...of the _Tempest_.

But Wicks and Carthew heeded him no longer. They lay back on the
gunwale,...

Page 315

...is no
doubt he was no longer the man that we have seen; sudden relief, the
sense...

Page 316

...Carthew as a young
gentleman come newly into a huge estate, but troubled with Jew debts
which...

Page 317

...the stranger.

"Well, you see he has!" says Wicks.

"And how is the old man?" asked the...

Page 318

...attractive inhabitants of this
planet, crowded round us in the pew, and fawned upon and patted...

Page 319

...of the mines, and I met him the other
day in Sydney. The last news he...

Page 320

...how Topelius was getting along, and, if
necessary, to give him a helping hand. But Topelius...

Page 321

...of Captain Trent had been made by a British skipper
to some British castaways.

Before we turned...

Page 322

...hand. It was
plainly desirable, from every point of view of convenience and contrast,
that our hero...