The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 16

By Robert Louis

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...Transcriber's notes:

Text following a carat character (^) was superscript in the original
...

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... ...

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... VI. THE DAY AFTER TO-MORROW ...

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... LAY MORALS ...

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...apparently getting rather better
than they gave. Schir William (reverend gentleman) was cruellie
slaughtered on the Links...

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...was one witness of the name of
Stevenson who held high the banner of the Covenant--John,
"Land-Labourer,[5]...

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...to go there fell not one drop; the place not rained on was
as big as...

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...of being Norse. But the story of Scottish
nomenclature is confounded by a continual process of...

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...much repeated in the legends
of the Children of the Mist.

But I am enabled, by my...

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...Beatons. No details were added. But the very name of
France was so detested in my...

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...1675, without doubt, there was born to these two a
son Robert, possibly a maltster in...

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...so far away as "Santt
Kittes," in the Leeward Islands--both, says the family Bible, "of a
fiver"...

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...Broughty Ferry, was drowned at sea while Thomas
was still young. He seems to have owned...

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...Buonaparte like Antichrist. Towards the end he
fell into a kind of dotage; his family must...

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...together two families for once
succeeded. Mr. Smith's two eldest daughters, Jean and Janet, fervent in
piety,...

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...such an occupation was strongly felt by stepfather and
stepson. It chanced that Thomas Smith was...

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...more than a moderate knowledge of
Latin, was at least no unusual student. And from the...

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...than
ours and a perpetual direction in the affairs of life. But the current
of their endeavours...

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...repetition of a shibboleth fulfils the law. Common
decency is at times forgot in the same...

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...Janet. Jean's complexion was extremely pale, Janet's
was florid; my grandmother's nose was straight, my great-aunt's
aquiline;...

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...informing his
wife that he was "in time for afternoon church "; similar assurances or
cognate excuses...

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...strain
of music, the hearts of the men of her own household. And there is
little doubt...

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...period of affliction in a letter to Miss Smith: "Your dear sister
but a little while...

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...and thousands of boats to sail on the
river Thames. But you must...

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...my mind--'Those whom ye deplore are
walking with me in white.' I conclude...

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..."_Westhaven, 17th July._

"I have been occupied to-day at the harbour of Newport,...

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...hope they have entered upon the writing.
The library will afford abundance of...

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...you will see marble in all its
stages, and perhaps you may there...

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... variety has a tendency to occupy the mind, and to keep it from
...

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... "_On board of the Lighthouse Yacht, July 29th._

"I got to Cromarty...

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...at all ages, from a few days to upwards
of sixty! Their prospects...

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...letters were by an exception cherished and
preserved, it would be for one or both of...

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...the Hebrides and illuminate
the navigation of the Minch; and the Mull of Kintyre. These works...

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...his taking
regular steps, but that it would be necessary for me to...

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...under charge of a foreman, and
despatching them about the coast as occasion served. The particular
danger...

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...narrow berth, to the clamorous and continued voices of the gale.

His perils and escapes were...

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...the swell, and clawed
off shore into the turbulent firth.

The purpose of these voyages was to...

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...be made drunk; they proposed
cards, and Soutar would not play. At last, one of them,...

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...visit. The tender lay in Loch
Eriboll; by five in the morning they sat down to...

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...There ran no post at all in the Long Island; from the
lighthouse on Barra Head...

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...it becomes, even in daylight, a deception, and
has often been fatally mistaken...

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...no windows, and in my grandfather's expression, "there was really
no demonstration of a house unless...

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...broken up the
barrows of the dead, and carried off the wines of the living; and...

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...of Stennis took shelter from a storm in a cottage close
by the...

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...between jest and earnest."


II

From about the beginning of the century up to 1807...

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...experience and present observation, the business is very much
neglected. One keeper is, in my view,...

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...At last my father
was storm-stayed one Sunday in a port at the other side of...

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...Board,
to put you upon your guard once for all at this time....

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...always with the
emphatic capitals, run continually in his correspondence. I will give
but two instances:--

...

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...these _unwilling_ witnesses
the language alluded to. I fixed upon Mr. Stewart as...

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...for the Northern Lights. When he was at a lighthouse
on a Sunday he held prayers...

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..._Traveller_ is almost a replica of that of
the _Elizabeth_ of Stromness; like the _Elizabeth_ she...

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...to
get the well so as to supply the keeper with water, for he is a...

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...once stood and looked on at the emptying of a certain oil-tube; he
did so watch...

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...summer water babbling on shallows;
and he must not only read, in a thousand indications, the...

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...him out with my invincible
triviality, a delight. Thus he pored over the engineer's voluminous
handy-book of...

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...posting himself and his family on every mortal subject. Of this
unpractical idealism we shall meet...

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...Rock. It extends to a length of about fourteen hundred
feet, but the part of it...

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...would be strained to catch the
roaring of the seas on the Bell Rock.

From 1794 onward,...

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...thought it
necessary to trouble Mr. Rennie with this order, but _I beg you will see
to...

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...great harvest of
prizes in the North Sea, one of which, a Prussian fishing dogger,
flat-bottomed and...

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...and
tell in his own words the story of his capital achievement. The tall
quarto of 533...

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...vessels in the
harbour also saluted, which made a very gay appearance. A number of the
friends...

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...the bow, to use the boat-hook in fending
or pushing off, and the other at the...

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...nature of this rock, even
during the day, and in the smoothest and calmest state of...

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...from the ocean, and in less than a
minute he was seen in the fullest splendour;...

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...had a
heavy and cloudy appearance, but the sea was smooth, though there was an
undulating motion...

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...This noise and
traffic had, however, the effect of almost completely banishing the herd
of seals which...

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...for the floating light, the _Smeaton_ was despatched for
Arbroath; and the writer, with the artificers,...

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...ship, his friends in the one boat calling to him to "Jump,"
while those in the...

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...and Sweethearts." It was customary,
upon these occasions, for the seamen and artificers to collect in...

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...writer further took them to
witness that it did not proceed from want of respect for...

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...stanchions of iron. These bats,
for the fixture of the principal and diagonal beams and bracing...

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...in
water, his face was not only scorched but continually exposed to volumes
of smoke, accompanied with...

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...way we
were about half a mile from the ship, but, being fortunately to
windward, we got...

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...the news of the workyard, but
seemed themselves to enjoy great pleasure in communicating whatever they
considered...

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...they were in proper order. The boat had no
sooner reached the vessel than she went...

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...the sound of the smith's anvil, continued, the
situation of things did not appear so awful....

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...to speak his mouth was so parched that his tongue refused
utterance, and he now learned...

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...to
windward; but, seeing that all was safe, after tacking for several hours
and making little progress,...

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...weather having
cleared up as we drew near the vessel, the eighteen artificers who had
remained on...

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...well greased
in the hause-hole. In this state things remained during the whole day,
every sea which...

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...in of the
water above, it is believed there was not an individual on board who...

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...to the companion-stair leading to the
quarter-deck. The writer, therefore, made the best of his way...

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...off.

In the dismal prospect of undergoing another night like the last, and
being in imminent hazard...

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...suet-pudding of Sunday, which was the only dish to be attempted
for the mess, from the...

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...the hempen cable, and see the state of the clinch or iron ring of the
chain-cable....

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...the agitation of the
sea upon the rock. The safety of the smith's forge was always...

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...rocks, where the water left her, and she having
_kanted_ to seaward, the next wave completely...

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...beam of the beacon; and a winch machine
was also bolted down to the rock for...

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...it, which now became, in its turn, the prop of the
tackle for raising the second...

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... Monday, 21st Sept.


The remaining two principal beams were erected in the course of this
tide,...

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...but finding a heavy sea
running on it were unable to land. The writer, however, had...

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...to-day, the weather was very favourable for
operations at the rock, and during the morning and...

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...height of from eight to twelve feet, or as high as the rise of
spring-tides. A...

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...professional skill, but for his facetious
and curious manner. Elliot had something peculiar in his history,...

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...the numerous seals that played
about the rock, they were now seen in great numbers, having...

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...affording only bread and water, yet _life_ would be
preserved, and the mind would still be...

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...another motive for leaving them behind. He
wanted to examine the site of the building without...

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...sent to fetch the people on board who had been left on the
rock.

Sunday,...

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...acquainted the writer that, when
the ballast was landed upon the quay at Leith, many persons...

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...occupied in assisting the millwrights in
laying the railways to hand. Sailors, of all other descriptions...

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...barometer also
had fallen from 30 in. to 29.6. It was, therefore, judged prudent to
shift the...

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...fifty people on board, and the decks
greatly lumbered with the two large boats, they were...

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...had occurred at the rock,
the workmen became much more cautious, and on some occasions their
timidity...

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...a good way, when, fortunately, one
of the sailors catched the sound of a blowing-horn. The...

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...a pretty long day
on board of the tender, but the smiths and joiners were kept...

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...of 1808 simply cut upon it with a chisel. A derrick, or spar of
timber, having...

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...nine a.m., and by a quarter-past twelve noon twenty-three
stones had been laid. The works being...

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...three years past been confined to a French prison, and
the deceased was the chief support...

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...p.m. Mr. Peter Logan had
also landed with fifteen masons, and immediately proceeded to set up...

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...morning, at a quarter-past eight, the artificers were landed as
usual, and, after three hours and...

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...she also was
hoisted on board of the tender.

At this time the cabins of the beacon...

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...winds and the sprays of the sea. The boat having
succeeded in landing, she returned at...

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...show the effects of such a happy turn of
mind, even under the most distressing and...

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...preferable quarters of
the two.

Saturday, 24th June.

Mr. Peter Logan, the foreman builder, and his...

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...same manner a rope furnished with a travelling pulley was distended
for the purpose of transporting...

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...into the boat, he was
accosted by Wishart, though in a feeble voice, and with an...

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...interstices were to be stuffed with moss as a light substance that
would resist dampness and...

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...he had been a soldier, a sutler, a writer's clerk,
and an apothecary, from which he...

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...therefore embraced
on the 25th, in sailing with provisions for the floating light, to carry
the necessary...

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...could not be effected without considerable hazard, it was, however,
accomplished, when twelve of their number,...

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...for the
first time on the Bell Rock; those present, counting thirty, were
crowded into the upper...

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...their
time. They always went from Arbroath to their arduous task cheering, and
they generally returned in...

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...access to the shelter of this forlorn
habitation, where a supply of provisions was kept; and...

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...employed in scraping the
seaweed off the upper course of the building, in order to apply...

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...joggle-holes in the upper course, and preparing all
things for commencing the building operations.

Sunday,...

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...should improve; but as the artificers had been
landed on the rock he was averse to...

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...to see that the fire of the cooking-house, and the lights in
general, were carefully extinguished...

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...more into form. Besides
the artificers and their cook, the writer and his servant were also
lodged...

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...before going to bed. The two remaining stones were,
however, laid in their places without mortar...

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...premiums consisted in a slump sum payable at the end of the
season, which extended from...

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...petticoat trousers, reaching only to his
knees, where they were met with a pair of long...

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...with the water while dashing down through the different floors;
and, as nearly as he could...

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...however,
there was often a difference of opinion between the builders and the
mortar-makers. John Watt, who...

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...one of those who was left on board of the ship, as he also
acted in...

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...he talked over the subject. They stated that they considered
the daily allowance of the seamen...

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...your people an
answer preferable to that of conversing with them on the...

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...fixed up in the galley this
afternoon, and whether he was satisfied with it. He replied...

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...to dismiss D----d and M----e, who are now sent on shore
with the...

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...interrupted, in
their operations on the top of the walls. These appearances were, in a
great measure,...

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...night, calculated for being triced up to
the roof through the day, which left free room...

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...not
stand protected unless he is actually on board of his ship, or in a boat
belonging...

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...came, the
building and beacon-house were seen, with consternation, while the ship
was hailed by those on...

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...the
Bell Rock could meet together at this period; and as in public works of
this kind,...

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...had been named spontaneously, from a sense of the
obligation which a public work of the...

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...when the rock was under water; but to-day his
boundary was greatly enlarged, for, instead of...

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...that toward those connected with this arduous work he would
ever retain the most heartfelt regard...

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...the writer invited the foremen and captains of the service,
together with Mr. David Logan, clerk...

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...but occasionally falling from a great height upon the
roof of their temporary lodging, without even...

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...the top of the building were
ranged on the balcony in the order in which they...

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...the writer
landed at the Bell Rock on Sunday, the 14th of October, and had the
pleasure...

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...were howling about their ears, and the waves
lashing with fury against the beams of their...

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...fuel,
and provisions, put up in a temporary way until the house could be
furnished with proper...

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...lightkeepers were to be
the complement, it was intended that three should always be at the...

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...had been made to mark the place with beacons, but all
efforts...

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...certain modifications in
Stevenson's plans, which the latter did not accept; nevertheless
...

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...have borne up like any hero; but there was
around me, in all my native town,...

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...map, its long row of Gaelic
place-names bear testimony to an old and settled race. Of...

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...Rock beacon rising
close in front, and as night draws in, the star of the Inchcape...

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...Light House, instead of having the satisfaction to meet
them with approbation and welcome their Family,...

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...fleeing at the gallop; the assassins loose-reined in pursuit,
Burley Balfour, pistol in hand, among the...

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...he not thrown his cloak about his
mouth, or had the witnesses forgot to chronicle the...

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...agreeable eccentric; during his
fond tenancy he had illustrated the outer walls, as high (if I...

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...manse, history is silent; but when they came to the door, the
poor caitiff, taking the...

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...Edinburgh, or on the Fair Isle itself in the catechist's
house; and to this day, they...

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...all) as properties for some possible romance or as
words to add to my vocabulary. To...

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...still on
hand and practises new follies.

Only one thing in connection with the harbour tempted me,...

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...assist the authorities. To contrary
interests, it should be observed, the curse of Babel is here...

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...off from the whole enterprise. But
it was too late. The attendants began to turn the...

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...of the sea under fifteen
tons of rock.

That two men should handle a stone so heavy,...

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...exasperating, as well as strangely
wearying, in these uncommanded evolutions. It is bitter to return to
infancy,...

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...the other.

Wick was scarce an eligible place of stay. But how much better it was...

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...they fared in it, and what
they thought of it, and when (if ever) they should...

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...one else's, and for that matter
(in the state of the sugar trade) is not worth...

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...very narrow existence--the practical and
everyday trouble of school tasks and the ultimate and airy one...

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...in his
dream-life he passed a long day in the surgical theatre, his heart in
his mouth,...

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...have
been long disused. A great, uneasy stillness lay upon the world. There
was no sign of...

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...manner) with the laws of life; the pleasure, in one
word, had become a business; and...

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...boxes, better tales than he could
fashion for himself.

Here is one, exactly as it came to...

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...and
rescue her; and there they stood face to face, she with that deadly
matter openly in...

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...with a pale face, she heard him as
he raved out his complaint: Why did she...

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...by piece, like a serial, and keep
him all the while in ignorance of where they...

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...done sleeping and what
part awake, and leave the reader to share what laurels there are,...

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...and detail as I have tried to write them; to
this I added only the external...

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...sir. Why, no, sir, I don't feel as
hearty myself as I could wish, but I...

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...sir." He was far
too smart a man to have remained a private; in the nature...

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...the spacious
days of Elizabeth. But, in the second case, I should most likely
pretermit these questionings,...

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...somewhat obvious ditty,

"Will ye gang, lassie, gang
To the...

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...was connatally incapable of comprehending. We have here
two temperaments face to face; both untrained, unsophisticated,
surprised...

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...thanks; they know
what they are about, he and his crew, when they pervade the slums...

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...misfortunes, it was always next door that he would go for help, or
only with such...

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...and when his
turn comes to be charitable, he looks in vain for a recipient. His
friends...

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...sand at the street-corners; shops
with golf-balls and bottled lollipops; another shop with penny pickwicks
(that remarkable...

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...Indeed, had that been
all, you might have done this often; but though fishing be a...

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...all bloody--horror!--the
fisher-wife herself, who continued thenceforth to hag-ride my thoughts,
and even to-day (as I recall...

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...a country wine that cannot be exported.

The idle manner of it was this:--

Toward the end...

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...or deep inquiries
into the rudiments of man and nature, these were so fiery and so
innocent,...

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...the inevitable end, that finest trait
of mankind; scorn of men's opinions, another element of virtue;...

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...with such wonder when we turn the pages of the realist.
There, to be sure, we...

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...the word!) is just
like you and me, or he would not be average. It was...

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...heaven of a recondite pleasure, the
ground of which is an ill-smelling lantern.


III

For, to...

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...enchanted atmosphere, that rainbow work of fancy that
clothes what is naked and seems to ennoble...

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...the secret of the philtre. The place is sanative; the air, the
light, the perfumes, and...

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...whatever manner, it is good for
the artist to dwell among graceful shapes. Fontainebleau, if it...

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...covering different provinces of life, recoiled aghast
before the innovation. But the girls were painters; there...

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...and his style falsified for life.

And this brings me to a warning. The life of...

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...well enough at least to
testify that there is no square mile without some special character...

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...the ancient
refuge of his race.

And yet the forest has been civilised throughout. The most savage
corners...

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...as to the nearest
pond; and at last, when the hue and cry began to blow...

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...instance at least, the
English and the Americans had made common cause to prevent a cruel
pleasantry....

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...a piece
of arrogance; if life be hard for such resolute and pious spirits, it is
harder...

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...so doing, they
protected Siron. Formal manners being laid aside, essential courtesy was
the more rigidly exacted;...

Page 213

...fortifying air, our blood renewed by
the sunshine, our spirits refreshed by the silence of the...

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...beaming on the
incurious dilettante from the walls of a hundred exhibitions. I have
seen it in...

Page 215

...fire, and the company that
gathered round the pillar in the kitchen. But the material fabric...

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...and Recloses still wait a pioneer; Bourron is out of
the question, being merely Grez over...

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...such fetches are still travelling like
indefatigable bagmen; but the imps of Fontainebleau, as of all...

Page 218

...aspire so high as to be numbered with the giants, it is still the
one quality...

Page 219

...the artist is this
tendency of the extreme of detail, when followed as a principle, to
degenerate...

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...resolutely commits his airy conception, his delicate
Ariel, to the touch of matter; he must decide,...

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...witty expedient, to
drive and coax them to effect his will. Given these means, so laughably
inadequate,...

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...good, or they would long
have been forgotten) haunt and tempt our fancy; offer us ready-made...

Page 223

...apt to err upon the
side of realism than to sin in quest of the ideal....

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...other, a singular limitation. The
sister arts enjoy the use of a plastic and ductile material,...

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...is that
point?

2. _The Web_.--Literature, although it stands apart by reason of the
great destiny and general...

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...yet still to give the effect of an ingenious
neatness.

The conjurer juggles with two oranges, and...

Page 227

...natural is the disjointed babble of the
chronicler; but which attains the highest degree of elegant...

Page 228

...easy nor too
hard. Hence it comes that it is much easier for men of equal...

Page 229

...hugely the
superior of the rival, or, if he be not, and still persist in his...

Page 230

...have heard our own description put in practice.

"All night | the dread |...

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...verse analysed above is due, so far as analysis
can carry us, part, indeed, to the...

Page 232

...one following another
will produce an instant impression of poverty, flatness, and
disenchantment. The same lines delivered...

Page 233

...in some languages this
element is almost, if not quite, extinct, and that in our own...

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...you will find another
and much stranger circumstance. Literature is written by and for two
senses: a...

Page 235

...which we have
been cautiously prepared since the beginning. The singular dignity of
the first clause, and...

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...so adroitly carried out. Indeed, the whole passage is a
monument of curious ingenuity; and it...

Page 237

...was my reward:--

"Meanwhile the disorders of Kannon's Kamp went on inKreasing. He
...

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...to be
articulated by the powers of man.

_Conclusion_.--We may now briefly enumerate the elements of style....

Page 239

...not think we need
be at all glad to have this question, so important to the...

Page 240

...hear he is, this duty becomes the more urgent, the
neglect of it the more disgraceful....

Page 241

...amply; that if he receives a
small wage, he is in a position to do considerable...

Page 242

...while the
antidote, in small volumes, lies unread upon the shelf. I have spoken
of the American...

Page 243

...himself an
angel or a monster; nor take this world for a hell; nor be suffered...

Page 244

...contemporary literature, ephemeral and feeble in itself,
touches in the minds of men the springs of...

Page 245

...own life being maim,
some of them are not admitted in his theory, and were only...

Page 246

...a masterpiece of appalling morality. But
the truth is, when books are conceived under a great...

Page 247

...art, you should
first long roll the subject under the tongue to make sure you like...

Page 248

...wage, but because it was a trade which
was useful in a very great and in...

Page 249

...with a singular change--that
monstrous, consuming _ego_ of ours being, for the nonce, struck out. To
be...

Page 250

...was in a dozen ways a finer fellow, and held in
a dozen ways a nobler...

Page 251

...these two qualities make him a wholesome, as his
intellectual vigour makes him a bracing, writer....

Page 252

...Its address lies
further back: its lesson comes more deeply home; when you have read, you
carry...

Page 253

...am like the young
friend of the anecdote--I think Willoughby an unmanly but a very
serviceable exposure...

Page 254

...content. Not all men can read all books; it is
only in a chosen few that...

Page 255

...spawn of
inspectors, who now begin, note-book in hand, to darken the face of
England. It may...

Page 256

...pleasures
of existence in something far liker an ant-heap than any previous human
polity. And this not...

Page 257

...British Parliament and then seriously bring it
such a task? I am not advancing this as...

Page 258

...civility of the man in office; and as an
experimentalist in several out-of-the-way provinces of life,...

Page 259

...the ant's example. Of those who
are found truly indefatigable in business, some are misers; some...

Page 260

...ant-heaps may sink even into
squalor. But suppose they do not; suppose our tricksy instrument of
human...

Page 261

...and their unromantic dissipations. When they are
taken in some pinch closer than the common, they...

Page 262

...missed in the
beginning, but would be missed progressively and progressively lamented.
Soon there would be a...

Page 263

...commune all will be centralised and sensitive. When jealousy
springs up, when (let us say) the...

Page 264

...of indifference,
contentment. If he be a youth of dainty senses or a brain easily heated,
the...

Page 265

...words, just
as other and perhaps the same men are born with the love of hunting,...

Page 266

...so that
there will always be one man the happier for his vigils. This is the
practical...

Page 267

...merit, posterity may possibly do justice; suppose, as is so
probable, you fail by even a...

Page 268

...of a mind so independent that he cannot
stoop to this necessity, one course is yet...

Page 269

...few of us
are! We all pledge ourselves to be able to continue to delight. And...

Page 270

...will lie? Perhaps they have never
observed what is the retiring allowance of a field officer;...

Page 271

...will hear of his
failure. Or he may have done well for years, and still do...

Page 272

...earth; others, like the moon, stable in desolation. All of
these we take to be made...

Page 273

...ever mutinied ship,
scuds through space with unimaginable speed, and turns alternate cheeks
to the reverberation of...

Page 274

...practice, they think they are to be rewarded in some future
life: stranger still, if they...

Page 275

...world over, in every stage of history, under every abuse of error,
under every circumstance of...

Page 276

...well; like us receive at
times unmerited refreshment, visitings of support, returns of courage;
and are condemned...

Page 277

...German wilderness; of how they mobbed Germanicus, clamouring to go
home; and of how, seizing their...

Page 278

...inverted
pleasure. If we cannot drive it from our minds--one thing of two:
either our creed is...

Page 279

...himself--here is a task for all that a
man has of fortitude and delicacy. He has...

Page 280

...the age.
I venture to call such moralists insincere. At any excess or perversion
of a natural...

Page 281

..._capitis diminutio_ of social
ostracism, is an affair of wisdom--of cunning, if you will--and not of
virtue.

In...

Page 282

...of
duties. Ill-temper and envy and revenge find here an arsenal of pious
disguises; this is the...

Page 283

...twitters from the quiet skies;
And from the west,
Where the...

Page 284

...free to qualify; unusual, and to me inspiring. If I
have at all learned the trade...

Page 285

...gossip on your rivals. And this is perhaps the moment when I
may best explain to...

Page 286

...that
you have never visited the scene of Damien's life and death. If you
had, and had...

Page 287

...When two gentlemen compete for the favour of a
lady, and the one succeeds and the...

Page 288

...Damien, but with Dr. Hyde. When I visited
the lazaretto Damien was already in his resting...

Page 289

...in you; and as the boat drew but a little nearer, and you
beheld the stairs...

Page 290

...large and populous as Kalawao and
Kalaupapa; and in such a matter every fresh case, like...

Page 291

...worst thing that he did,
and certainly the easiest. The best and worst of the man...

Page 292

...the affair of Mr.
Chapman's money, and were singly struck by Damien's intended
wrong-doing. I was struck...

Page 293

...his own religion with the simplicity of a
peasant or a child; as I would I...

Page 294

...mind not prejudiced by jealousy, all the reforms of the
lazaretto, and even those which he...

Page 295

...miserable little ----" (here is a word I
dare not print, it would so shock your...

Page 296

...you or me,
who did what we have never dreamed of daring--he too tasted of our
common...

Page 297

...cover a long vista of years.
"Rathillet" was attempted before fifteen, "The Vendetta" at twenty-nine,
and the...

Page 298

...red moors and by the side of the
golden burn; the rude, pure air of our...

Page 299

...began to appear there visibly among imaginary woods; and
their brown faces and bright weapons peeped...

Page 300

...a monopoly of skeletons or make a corner in talking birds. The
stockade, I am told,...

Page 301

...at the same time, we
would by no means stop our readings; and accordingly the tale...

Page 302

...of the faithful; and John Addington Symonds (to whom I timidly
mentioned what I was engaged...

Page 303

...manuscript,
and the map along with it, to Messrs. Cassell. The proofs came, they
were corrected, but...

Page 304

...is out,
and still on the same nags, to cover fifty in one day, as may...

Page 305

...brought up with a
reflection exceedingly just in itself, but which, as the sequel shows, I
failed...

Page 306

...the fable and the character required, behold
I found them lying ready and nine years old...

Page 307

...do; he, or my own evil heart, suggested it was easy to
disguise his ancient livery...

Page 308

...I admired his name exceedingly, so that I must
have been taught the love of beautiful...

Page 309

...tourist, on the other a rod like a
billiard cue, appeared to accompany my progress: the...

Page 310

...quiet waters by."

The remainder of my childish recollections are all of the matter of what
was...

Page 311

...books of childhood. In the future we are to approach
the silent, inexpressive type alone, like...

Page 312

...library was a spot of some austerity: the proceedings of learned
societies, some Latin divinity, cyclopaedias,...

Page 313

...think it the best of Sir Walter's by
nearly as much as Sir Walter is the...

Page 314

...to be defective. (2) Even justice is no right of a
man's own, but a thing,...

Page 315

...to carry the burthen of our sins, sorrows, and physical
infirmities; and too many of us...

Page 316

...existence of the newspaper in which our adventures
are now appearing; but it would neither become...

Page 317

...I
expressed myself, I am still confident in my own heart that I spoke at
that moment...

Page 318

...we are in the
thick of a novel which we do not even understand? And how,...

Page 319

...literature at all. And am I to be
blamed or hated, because some one else wilfully...

Page 320

...spreads intelligence; and it
increases the acquaintance of man with man. (5) It is, besides, a...

Page 321

...gentlemen, after all. There is nothing to make a work about.


VII. DISCIPLINE OF CONSCIENCE.--(1) Never...

Page 322

...But in truth a chief part of
education is to exercise one set of faculties _a...

Page 323

...can set no limit. Though we steer after a fashion, yet we must
sail according to...

Page 324

...I from my
spy-hole, looking with purblind eyes upon the least part of a fraction
of the...

Page 325

...persuaded
we can on the whole live rather beneficially than hurtfully to others.
Remove this persuasion, and...

Page 326

...living witness whose blame will most affect
you, to eat, to sleep, to live with your...

Page 327

...where we propose to spend
a life: a desert and some living water.

There are many parts...

Page 328

...and the water, the conjunction of many near and bold
details is bold scenery for the...

Page 329

...by which, upon a
sunny morning, your ear will suddenly be ravished with a burst of...

Page 330

...of Canaletto's etchings, and a tile fire-place for
the winter. In neither of these public places...

Page 331

...day's play,
refresh the outlines of the country; red or white for the two kinds of
road...

Page 332

...and, what is worse, between two
experiences, is doubly relative. The speaker buries his meaning; it...

Page 333

...doctrine of Christ. What He taught (and in this He is like all other
teachers worthy...

Page 334

...treatise "How to make the best of both worlds." Of
both worlds indeed! Which am I...

Page 335

...be a true disciple is to think of the same things as our
prophet, and to...

Page 336

...chance; each should be another proof that in the
torrent of the years and generations, where...

Page 337

...continue to nod; they are strangely at peace; they know all
he has to say; ring...

Page 338

...a to-morrow? Will your own Past truly
guide you in your own violent and unexpected Future?...

Page 339

...to strength, and ourselves to live
rightly in the eye of some more exacting potentate than...

Page 340

...with some force. He was at that age of a
conversible temper, and insatiably curious in...

Page 341

...will tamely acquiesce
in their existence, and knowingly profit by their complications. Yet all
this while he...

Page 342

...die. Now should he die, he saw no means of
repaying this huge loan which, by...

Page 343

...and not of money,--is he any the
less a thief? The one gave a bad shilling,...

Page 344

...of this
office, or still book your profits and keep on flooding the world with
these injurious...

Page 345

...you want, you have their whole
spirit compressed into the golden rule; and yet there expressed...

Page 346

...illustration, though its
truth were resplendent like the sun, and it was announced from heaven by
the...

Page 347

...populous
cities, spends his days to deliver the ends of the earth or to benefit
unborn posterity;...

Page 348

...woman
at his beck, and there is not a joy for him in all the world....

Page 349

...immediate point. What is the man? There
is Something that was before hunger and that remains...

Page 350

...higher spirit than you
had dreamed betweenwhiles, and erect above all base considerations? This
soul seems hardly...

Page 351

...self or soul appears to him by
successive revelations, and is frequently obscured. It is from...

Page 352

...now moves on uninterrupted like a river; through all the
extremes and ups and downs of...

Page 353

...failure in life; this is temporal
damnation; damnation on the spot and without the form of...

Page 354

...have
money, but because that also is a part of respectability, and we cannot
hope to be...

Page 355

...seeing whether, by this system as well as by others,
current doctrines could show any probable...

Page 356

...much nobler to
respect oneself and utter the voice of God. God, if there be any...

Page 357

...bark. There may be political wisdom in such a view;
but I am persuaded there can...

Page 358

...of people are merely
speaking in their sleep.

It is a commonplace, enshrined, if I mistake not,...

Page 359

...be respectable, might be
gloriously useful; it is the other man who would be good.

The soul...

Page 360

...and continually before his
mind than those which bind him into the eternal system of things,
support...

Page 361

...incalculably
higher degree, and by a far surer sort of property, than to purchase a
farm of...

Page 362

...do something in your
turn. It is not enough to take off your hat, or to...

Page 363

...my own personal
delight." And though St. Paul, if he had possessed a private fortune,
would probably...

Page 364

...manage or to sell, he would still be morally penniless, and have the
world to begin...

Page 365

...judging. Thus I shall be very easily persuaded
that a man has earned his daily bread;...

Page 366

...all he must choose the
most honest and serviceable, and not the most highly remunerated. We
have...

Page 367

...having bought a whistle when I did
not want one. I find I regret this, or...

Page 368

...will be surprised
to find how little money it requires to keep him in complete contentment
and...

Page 369

...fine clothes? It is not possible to answer these questions
without a trial; and there is...

Page 370

...career on honourable principles; he finds his talents
and instincts can be best contented in a...

Page 371

...man to spend money on
that which he can truly and thoroughly enjoy, the doctrine applies...

Page 372

...our friendly
helpers in this foreign isle. Let peace abound in our small company.
Purge out of...

Page 373

...the world, so let our loving-kindness make
bright this house of our habitation.


_Another for...

Page 374

...we blindly
labour, suffer us to be so far constant to ourselves and our beloved.


...

Page 375

...friends, be with ourselves. Go with
each of us to rest; if any awake, temper to...

Page 376

...the soul of service, the spirit of
peace; renew in us the sense of joy.




END OF...