The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 17

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...Transcriber's note:

The following typographical errors have been corrected:

In page 58 "He was was...

Page 1

... ...

Page 2

... ...

Page 3

...and telegraphs and iron war-ships, the ideas and the manners of the
native actors date back...

Page 4

...case of a Highland
chief: born one of the great ones of his clan, he was...

Page 5

...as high a proportion as
can be hoped in these distracted islands; and he counted among...

Page 6

...holder of any of the five _names_, in short, he is a
man to be reckoned...

Page 7

...always asking his
white advisers if "things were done correctly." Let us try to be as...

Page 8

...every pleasure which
an islander conceives; and when the _malanga_ sets forth, the same
welcome and the...

Page 9

...taro-tops
for planting, of tools, of flyhooks, of implements for netting pigeons,
and of mats. It is...

Page 10

...and repainted by the
original owner.

Such customs, it might be argued, being double-edged, will ultimately
right themselves....

Page 11

...the condition--that they should be let alone--is now no
longer possible. More than a hundred years...

Page 12

...reader will go forward
past the stores of Mr. Moors (American) and Messrs. MacArthur (English);
past the...

Page 13

...been told it was the seat of
government, driven (as I have to relate) over the...

Page 14

...can be in a new conspiracy every day!"
Many, on the other hand, are sincerely concerned...

Page 15

...men on the
beach."

But the true centre of trouble, the head of the boil of which...

Page 16

...labour
traffic; and I shall ask permission in this place only to touch it with
the tongs....

Page 17

...and the
responsibility of administering with one hand so many conjunct fortunes,
might well nerve the manager...

Page 18

...how
much devotion and audacity have been spent in vain. His name still
lives in the songs...

Page 19

...to extend their own provinces and to curtail the dealings of
their rivals. In the first,...

Page 20

...for money; it was
something of the suddenest that Sir Arthur Gordon himself, smarting
under a sensible...

Page 21

...from life and from his family in dreadful
isolation. These ideas most Polynesians have accepted in...

Page 22

...of his own,
whither he conveyed, or pretended to convey, the fugitives. In October
1885 a trenchant...

Page 23

...lay in port, and it was hinted that these would shortly
intervene.

Succeed in frightening a child,...

Page 24

...into the hands of Dr. Stuebel. The Germans
may have been wrong before; they were now...

Page 25

...with weapons; so were the
Americans; so, but for our salutary British law, would have been...

Page 26

...were solemnly
retracted. The Germans expressly disowned Tamasese; and the islands fell
into a period of suspense,...

Page 27

...to "get information of the captain's doings":
surely supererogation of deceit.

_The Hawaiian Embassy_. The prime minister...

Page 28

...in support. The expedition was futile in
its course, almost tragic in result. The _Kaimiloa_ was...

Page 29

...of the great
German Empire. But Becker could not prevent the hunted Laupepa from
taking refuge in...

Page 30

...mats in the
house of Tamasese, when the events began. Strong speaks German freely, a
fact which...

Page 31

...* * *...

Page 32

...Samoan
affairs was adjourned till autumn, so that "the ministers of Germany and
Great Britain might submit...

Page 33

...was ruin at the door.
He rode at once to Apia, and summoned his chiefs. The...

Page 34

...was to send
for Mataafa twice: "I am alone in the bush; if you do not...

Page 35

...offence the village was ultimately burned by German
sailors, in a very decent and orderly style,...

Page 36

...word of his lurking-place, surrounded the hamlet
under cloud of night, and in the early morning...

Page 37

...Laupepa as a hero; but he is a man
of certain virtues, which the Germans had...

Page 38

...the sheep
departed with the halo of a saint, and men thought of him as of...

Page 39

...said the governor; "there is no fire allowed to burn in
it." In one part of...

Page 40

...passed through "a narrow passage where
they went very slow and which was just like a...

Page 41

...their common subjects. Meanwhile, he
himself was exposed (if all tales be true) to much dictation...

Page 42

...to the consuls, for a man of the
character of Sewall, must have cut like a...

Page 43

...three nationalities; Martin had served far
beyond his term, and should have been succeeded months before...

Page 44

...pro-consul. But he had forgotten a paper, and in an
evil hour returned for it alone....

Page 45

...of Apia, the gaol, the police, all passed into
the hands of Tamasese-Brandeis; a German was...

Page 46

...time) in their own tapa.
He laid the beginnings of a royal territorial army. The first...

Page 47

...of the taxes; and one, of the roads. This I may
give in full from the...

Page 48

...These, when they were brought to
his notice, Brandeis disowned, and he is entitled to be...

Page 49

...degree of white opposition. And it is
true that before fate overtook the Brandeis government, it...

Page 50

...under the new government from the beginning, and
Tamasese usurped his place and title. As early...

Page 51

...north central quarters of Upolu--practically what is shown upon the
map opposite. There the taxes were...

Page 52

...August is unknown to whites; it passed altogether in the
covert of the woods or in...

Page 53

...increase of
his usual nervous manner. One spoke to him by the way. He expressed his
sorrow...

Page 54

...most promising that has ever
been in these unlucky islands--was from that hour a piece of...

Page 55

...successor, Captain
Fritze, was an officer of a different stamp. I have nothing to say of
him...

Page 56

...High Chief Tamasese"--a
device as old at least as the wars of Robert Bruce--in order to...

Page 57

...strong,
departed with their arms and ammunition. On the 7th of September, for
instance, the day after...

Page 58

...conceived himself to have a claim, he set up the emblem of
his country; and the...

Page 59

...fall upon and carry that. And there is no doubt in
my mind that such a...

Page 60

...a few
hours the white man was in direct communication with the opposing
general. The next morning...

Page 61

...and harlots of Apia
toiled in the front upon a trench, digging with knives and cocoa-shells;
and...

Page 62

...came leaping and cheering,
his gun in one hand, a basket of three heads in the...

Page 63

...the air. My native friend,
Mrs. Mary Hamilton, ran out of her house and gave the...

Page 64

...de Coetlogons from the English
consulate beheld the ground strewn with these badges discarded; and
close by...

Page 65

...privately
intriguing, or pretending to intrigue, with Mataafa. In his despatch of
the 11th, he had given...

Page 66

...and that of his country
engaged in the support of that government which they had provoked...

Page 67

...on the one side or a great lack of capacity on the other,
supplies were maintained...

Page 68

...could not long hold
out. Becker had his way; and the neutral boundary was chosen just...

Page 69

...long interviews in which he was tempted
and plied with drink by Becker or Beckmann of...

Page 70

...Laupepa had fallen in ill-blood with one of them;
his only idea of defence had been...

Page 71

...his gratitude
as though he meant it, declaring his own hands would be thus
strengthened for the...

Page 72

...absurd affair. Scanlon had both his fun and his money,
and Leary's practical joke was brought...

Page 73

...occasion to refer to the strange appearance in these islands
of an American adventurer with a...

Page 74

...scattered, and came to land unhurt in
different quarters of Matautu. The volleys, fired inshore, raked...

Page 75

...was on
the old guard; announced that he had acted on the requisition of his
consul, who...

Page 76

...innocent of proceeding on Mulinuu. Or suppose the
diving operations, and the native testimony, and Pelly's...

Page 77

...of Becker, had fallen back in
civilisation about a thousand years.

There falls one more incident to...

Page 78

...with alarming symptoms of belly-ache whenever Mrs. de Coetlogon
went her rounds at night: he was...

Page 79

...Next door to the consulate,
some native houses and a chapel (now ruinous) stood on a...

Page 80

...not wholly to be blamed for this delay, which depended
upon island etiquette. His Savaii contingent...

Page 81

...on the opposite hill. Thence they made
their way to the left flank of the Mataafa...

Page 82

...his rear. There was his
bread-basket; a small success in that direction would immediately
curtail his resources;...

Page 83

...for these instruments of death in money
or in labour, misused them as it was known...

Page 84

...and unencumbered, had made a fool of the huge
floating forts upon the other side; and...

Page 85

...a German loiterer had been a matter of
extreme concern. Ten days later, three commissioners, an...

Page 86

...the islanders; of a genial, amiable, and sanguine
temper, he made no doubt but he could...

Page 87

...elbow, was not
likely to lag behind. And Mataafa having communicated Knappe's letter,
the example of the...

Page 88

...both sides; the Tamaseses fearing they were
deserted, the Mataafas (with secret delight) hoping they were...

Page 89

...been restored between the States and Germany, and that all three
were convinced of their fundamental...

Page 90

...the demonstration at Laulii was thus immediately cast
away; de Coetlogon's prestige was lessened; and it...

Page 91

...have been still in the nature of a disgrace.
Brandeis's letter, written by a German, was...

Page 92

...on the spot, and should now redound to his credit. It is
to be hoped he...

Page 93

...concealed on
board the German ships. And a watch was accordingly set and warriors
collected along the...

Page 94

...wade to shore. At
the same time the eye of panic descried a breastwork of "foreign...

Page 95

...a casualty. Meanwhile the sound of the firing from Sunga
immediately renewed the hostilities at Fangalii....

Page 96

...gave an irremediable air of defeat to what might have been else
claimed for a moderate...

Page 97

...his boys conceal themselves in a thicket, this
brave man walked into the open. So soon...

Page 98

...the text of
Fritze's orders, and the probabilities of the case, no honest mind will
believe it...

Page 99

...boarded the _Adler_ to protest, succeeded in wresting
from Knappe a period of delay in order...

Page 100

...way and another, he is not a good witness. As for the
natives, they were no...

Page 101

...the weeks that were now to
follow, Knappe believed the contrary; he believed not only that...

Page 102

...inland at Mangiangi; they flew high over the Mataafa camp, where
the natives could "hear them...

Page 103

...did
not "allow a full occupation of the outer line"; hence they had shrunk
into the western...

Page 104

...despatch, confutes himself and confirms the
testimony of his naval colleague, by the admission that "the
re-establishment...

Page 105

...have had the honour to receive your
Excellency's [_Hochwohlgeboren_] agreeable communication of to-day.
Since, on the ground...

Page 106

...and discretion of the _Samoa Times_. Yet the
editor, Cusack, is only an amateur in journalism,...

Page 107

...nothing but his ship, and shrewdly
suspected that his martial jurisdiction should be confined within the
same...

Page 108

...offered to the world a perfectly
original reading of the part of British seaman.

Hand may have...

Page 109

...of Samoa by Germany, lay outside of your instructions and of
our design. Take it immediately...

Page 110

...The ill-found island traders ride there with their
insufficient moorings the year through, and discharge, and...

Page 111

...a number of small
craft, further encumbered the anchorage. Its capacity is estimated by
Captain Kane at...

Page 112

...amid driving mist and rain. The wind blew into the
harbour mouth. Naval authorities describe it...

Page 113

...reef and
beach upon a space of sand; where she was immediately deserted by her
crew, with...

Page 114

...help of Samoans, always nobly
forward in the work, whether for friend or enemy, Knappe sought...

Page 115

...have power to drive the ship against wind
and sea, if she should answer the helm,...

Page 116

...loss of all the ornamental work
about her bow and stern, three anchors, one kedge-anchor, fourteen
lengths...

Page 117

...she beheld across her course the submerged
_Vandalia_, the tops filled with exhausted seamen. Happily the...

Page 118

...bosoms an
emotion too serious for the rule of greed, or perhaps that greed was
for the...

Page 119

...ship, "This has been a
means of grace." Nor did he forget to thank and compliment...

Page 120

...by Germany is rare in history; in the
career of Prince Bismarck, so far as I...

Page 121

...more than all his power
and popularity. He was the idol of the whole nation but...

Page 122

...the attendance and respect befitting
royalty; and the two Malietoas, with so many causes of disunion,...

Page 123

...administer law in Samoa. Their coming was
expected with an impatience, with a childishness of trust,...

Page 124

...about the island; and intrigue, one
moment suspended, was resumed.

In the Berlin Act, the three Powers...

Page 125

...however, to secure the
sympathy, failed even to gain the confidence, of Mataafa. The latter is
not...

Page 126

...claimed, "according to the laws
and customs of Samoa," duly to appoint another. The orators of...

Page 127

...developed, becomes daily
stranger to observe. On the one hand, Mataafa sits in Malie, assumes a
regal...

Page 128

...king _in all parts_ of Samoa, there is
perhaps no such matter as a kingship of...

Page 129

...the famous and obscure "laws and customs of
Samoa."

But though it may be possible to attain,...

Page 130

...and worst of the mistakes on the Laupepa side it would be
unfair to blame any...

Page 131

...let it
suffice that, if rumour carried to Mataafa the language I have heard
used in my...

Page 132

...he has always disliked the measure; and it
occurred to him at last that he might...

Page 133

...for it was expressly directed that they were to
be used as gentlemen and not as...

Page 134

...of dynamite, the
needful mechanism, and the loan of a mechanic; the gaol was mined, and
the...

Page 135

...the west, there
is, first of all, a mangrove swamp, the mangroves excellently green, the
mud ink-black,...

Page 136

...new house of the president. His Majesty
himself beholds it daily, and the tenor of his...

Page 137

... ...

Page 138

...for Dr. Hagberg; it is known
that he has himself applied for an advance and been...

Page 139

...private policy) have long
been beyond hope. And only the other day (May 6th, 1892), on...

Page 140

...the midst a tall house of assembly, by far the greatest
Samoan structure now in these...

Page 141

...some bitterness; to Laupepa, with a
smile, as "my poor brother." For himself, he stands upon...

Page 142

...remain two points on
which it would be improper to be silent. I should be blamed...

Page 143

...tended to damage his own character and to lower the credit of
the appellate court. Having...

Page 144

...It is always the
easier game to be in opposition. The tale of David and Saul...

Page 145

...wise Stuebel and the loyal Brandeis,--that I make my
appeal.

_May_ 25,...

Page 146

...do likewise.' I missed that man. I never could see much harm
in Johnny."

"What did he...

Page 147

...I sailed to the next, rough customers made the most of
the society. Now to see...

Page 148

...last trader had fled the
place at half an hour's notice, taking a chance passage in...

Page 149

...a chemise, and it was wetted through. She was young and very
slender for an island...

Page 150

...bread, a few bolts of cotton stuff, not to be compared
with mine; the only thing...

Page 151

...and stood in a bad place, behind the village, in the
borders of the bush, and...

Page 152

...she understood; the song rose into a cry, and stopped;
the woman crouched out of the...

Page 153

...ledger:--

This is to certify that Uma, daughter of Fa'avao of Falesa, Island...

Page 154

...had done the courting for me in style--told her I was
mad to have her, and...

Page 155

...speak if I had wanted; and if I could, I would not. I was
ashamed to...

Page 156

...of a half-circle, flanking my house: the river
divided them, some were on the near side,...

Page 157

...something in the native with a
gasping voice. Three little boys sat beside my path, where...

Page 158

...consume
me, bones and baggage. But by evening, like real islanders, they had
wearied of the business,...

Page 159

...dreaming the looks of my public, by a cant of a broad
high-road like an avenue,...

Page 160

...copra was
as plenty," says he--I thought, slyly--"but there don't seem anything
doing."

I could see Black Jack...

Page 161

...and I had to hold them
apart; and there was Adams in the middle, gone luny...

Page 162

...ai!_" says she. She always used the native when she meant "no"
more than usually strong,...

Page 163

...kind of a shock was given me, I should run away again to-morrow. To
see that...

Page 164

...all idea of respect for
whites. What we want is a man-of-war--a German, if we could--they...

Page 165

...thing was clear: there was no sign of anger in the chiefs.

"What's he been saying?"...

Page 166

...which was no very pleasant sight to me, and at
some of his answers the crowd...

Page 167

...the hang of it; but it began
to look bad before the end."

"I've heard a different...

Page 168

...make 'em? We traders have a lot of gall, I
must say; we make these poor...

Page 169

...folks afraid of me?"

She stood and looked at me with eyes like saucers.

"You no savvy?"...

Page 170

...I tried to take her hand, but she would
none of that. "Uma," I said, "there's...

Page 171

...with my lass
upon my knee, made sure of her with one hand, and ate with...

Page 172

...Falesa that he had got for a bad debt, which was what put
it in the...

Page 173

...too much
'fraid," she said.

The only soul that came about them after this desertion was Master...

Page 174

...towards the
river.

From the opposite side there was another man aiming for the same place,
but he...

Page 175

...us,
and make no concealment; and, besides, they're partly Kanakaised, and
suck up with natives instead of...

Page 176

...want? Well, I'll tell you the first
thing. I'm what you call a sinner--what I call...

Page 177

..."The first thing he would do is this, I
guess." And I took and tore up...

Page 178

...a little caught up at my swearing, just when all was going
straight; and so was...

Page 179

...and he ended by confessing that he
had been much concerned to find his people using...

Page 180

...but take care not to
learn to be unholy. Misi, Case is my college.'

"I knew not...

Page 181

...he was struck with a general palsy, all of him dead but
one eye, which he...

Page 182

...are received; it fell in my duty to make a notification on
the subject, and this...

Page 183

...what is the profit to the local trader?" he asked.

"You may call it three pounds,"...

Page 184

...priest came and sat and
yarned, none of his folks could be enticed into my store;...

Page 185

...in two parts, and stood close on the
beach; and at high water the sea broke...

Page 186

...them
so free, which is not common, I had better fish for a little information
about myself...

Page 187

...the
desert among all the _aitus_. Some of the boldest, however, had
accompanied him, and had heard...

Page 188

...caves; great trees overhang the cliffs, and dangle-down lianas; and
in one place, about the middle,...

Page 189

...would have turned his back to and fled home to Falesa; but
these five were like...

Page 190

...was no boar, but a thing that was a man with a man's thoughts.
At that...

Page 191

...hand; and whenever he listens he hears always
something new--men talking, children laughing, the strokes of...

Page 192

...about me like a hunter, fully expecting to see a handsome young
woman sitting somewhere in...

Page 193

...says, and slipped down the tree, and set out again
to find my enemy's head office,...

Page 194

...out to me the first day that
he was a good forger of island curiosities, a...

Page 195

...it came in my mind how the master had once flogged that
boy, and the surprise...

Page 196

...on your head to this blooming hour,
and I've more cooking for you. I'm not a...

Page 197

...that a fellow can really put
in the time with if his pipe is broke--but a...

Page 198

...beach, I thought it might very well cost me my life. Case had as
good as...

Page 199

...send that man to
glory!"

So off Maea went, pretty well pleased, as I could see.


FOOTNOTE:

...

Page 200

...it might
be eight o'clock when I took the road, laden like a donkey. First there
was...

Page 201

...and twisted rope-ends of lianas, made the
whole place, or all that you could see of...

Page 202

...never thought of Case; what took me, as
sharp as the colic, was the old wives'...

Page 203

...he
was set there to watch; and it looked to me as if my tomfool word...

Page 204

...I might have
run in still and rescued it. But who was going to trust the...

Page 205

...to kindle. But the trouble was that the place was
all lit up--not very bright, but...

Page 206

...scurried and put out before. No more of that for me.
He had knocked over my...

Page 207

...in my forearm like a weasel. Much I cared. My leg
gave me all the pain...

Page 208

...was able,
and when I got there she was broad awake, and crying and sobbing to
herself...

Page 209

...a pretty sick view of the dear departed's prospects, and seemed to
have his own ideas...

Page 210

...there was I, left alone in my glory at Falesa; and when the schooner
came round...

Page 211

...of the century, will here recognise the name and the root
idea of a piece once...

Page 212

...house.

"This is a fine house of mine," said the man, and bitterly sighed.
"Would you not...

Page 213

...Cook had this bottle, and by it he found his way to so many
islands; but...

Page 214

...when you offer a
bottle so singular for eighty odd dollars, people suppose you to be
jesting....

Page 215

...jammed into the pocket of his
pilot-coat.

"And that looks like the truth," said Keawe.

The next thing...

Page 216

...house and
garden on the Kona Coast, where I was born, the sun shining in at...

Page 217

...fund of money.

"And here is the money for the house!" cried Lopaka.

"If you are thinking...

Page 218

...the thought that was in
Keawe's mind.

Now, the house stood on the mountain side, visible to...

Page 219

...not grudge me one more proof."

"I have sworn I would take no more favours," said...

Page 220

...the way by the tombs,
must be all tenfold more dangerous to a man with such...

Page 221

...no more of it. Then he saw her white
shift flutter as she put it on,...

Page 222

...her parents, and
made a mock of Keawe, for she had a quick wit. The next...

Page 223

...sing as he filled the
marble basin; and heard him sing, and the singing broken, as...

Page 224

...have wed Kokua even as he was; and so many would
have done, because they have...

Page 225

...for the house of Kiano.
There it sat, low upon the shore in the black rocks,...

Page 226

...all the gifts of the little imp, and these glad faces are
the faces of men...

Page 227

...have all my fortune in the bargain. I was
mad when I bought it at that...

Page 228

...burn in the
bottomless pit. The girl, indeed, had come to him wholly; her heart
leapt in...

Page 229

...you!
Well, you shall know all. Then, at least, you will pity poor Keawe; then
you will...

Page 230

...clothes and the
bravest of the knick-knacks in the house. "For," said she, "we must seem
to...

Page 231

...not an easy subject to introduce; it was not easy
to persuade people you were in...

Page 232

...little in the hour of weakness to intrude upon
his shame. With the thought she drew...

Page 233

...you will buy it for four centimes, and I will buy it
again for three. And...

Page 234

...her flesh withered on the coals.

Near day she came to her mind again, and returned...

Page 235

...for
the poor holder."

Then Keawe, because he felt the truth of what she said, grew the...

Page 236

...the boatswain. "Never you trust a
petticoat with dollars. They're all as false as water; you...

Page 237

...sea-billow, and the house
span about him like a wreath of smoke, for he saw he...

Page 238

...rum, or what you please, and you will see the virtue of the
thing."

"Very well, Kanaka,"...

Page 239

...[7] Whites.




THE ISLE OF VOICES




THE ISLE OF VOICES


Keola was married with Lehua, daughter of Kalamake,...

Page 240

...shore and the birds fly about the cliff. It was a chief
thought with him always--the...

Page 241

...I do here in my own house and under the plain eye of day."

So saying,...

Page 242

...like the palms
of the Eight Islands, but tall and fresh and beautiful, and hanging out
withered...

Page 243

...leaves.

"It will be your part," said he, "to keep the leaves alight, and feed
the fire...

Page 244

...on the beach, and he leaves me to pine for a concertina!
Let him beware: I...

Page 245

...thoroughly before to-morrow,"
said Kalamake. "Pili's boat is the better suited for my purpose. So, if
you...

Page 246

...the
stars and the lantern the warlock seemed to change.

"What ails you?" cried Keola, quick and...

Page 247

...sea there was never a man
so terrified as this Keola. He swam indeed, but he...

Page 248

...was the most difficult man to
please Keola had ever met with, and beat and cursed...

Page 249

...or else pretending, and if a sail shook they would jump
to their feet and fall...

Page 250

...with the others.

All this while he kept by the inside of the island, for the...

Page 251

...he kept the most close to the lagoon side, and, as far as he
dared, abode...

Page 252

...in their own island
where they stayed, and they told him no, not there; nor yet...

Page 253

...to my mouth that I may whisper, for no
one must hear us. Two days before...

Page 254

...the white teeth
shining in their mouths, and his gorge rose at the sight; and when...

Page 255

...the beach and flying in the air higher and swifter than eagles.

"And to think how...

Page 256

...One tree had
fallen, others were part hewed away. There was the tribe clustered. They
were back...

Page 257

...speeded and blew the burning with her breath. The last leaf was
eaten, the flame fell,...

Page 258

...his heels
upon the Isle of Voices, who shall say?




END OF VOL. XVII




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