The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 19

By Robert Louis

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... 39

V. THE CARGO...

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...Son ...

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... 297




THE EBB-TIDE

...

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...If our three books are in no wise great, they preserve, it
seems to me, something...

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...of sleep. The same
temperature in England would have passed without remark in summer; but
it was...

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...was the son of an intelligent, active, and ambitious man,
small partner in a considerable London...

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...in a passage on the mail brigantine, the _City of
Papeete_. With what expectation he had...

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...of flying clouds of
every size and shape and density, some black as inkstains, some delicate
as...

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...the sick-room; he lay here now, in the cold open,
exposed to the gusting of the...

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...I had seen that in the _Freischuetz_:
and that you took off your coat and turned...

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...the carpet.' 'You don't mean to say this is the
Travelling Carpet?' I cried. 'You bet...

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...I was like a fellow caught up out of Hell and flung down into
the dandiest...

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...twenty dollars in assorted toys for
the pickaninnies; and then to a confectioner's and take in...

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...day was spread upon
Papeete; and the wall of breaking seas upon the reef, and the...

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...the influenza.

The captain stopped suddenly, appeared to perceive his audience for the
first time, and represented...

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...same currency from the
melodious-minded natives, always, as now, to their delight.

He was in the middle...

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...soon as the last foot was off the plank, turned to
the hands to work cargo.

The...

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...don't cost anything to say you're well and happy,
and sorry you can't make a remittance...

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... never doubt me in that, you least of all. I have always unceasingly
...

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...little isle sits green with palms.
I am well and strong. It is...

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...a hole
in her side with an auger."

"O, you lost her, did you?" said the clerk....

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...glow of the tropic afternoon, the green of
sunbright foliage, stared into that shady place through...

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...or furlough, bearing the
unbearable? _Ich trage unertraegliches_, the quotation rose in his mind;
he repeated the...

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...the friendly touch, that's all." And he
shambled grumbling out of the cell into the staring...

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...he did.
However, there _he_ was, dead; and here are the Kanakas as good as lost.
They...

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...Herrick.

"I guess there's a beach at Sydney," returned the captain; "and I'll
tell you one thing,...

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...think I would go drown myself, and I got children
starving? Enjoy it? No, by God,...

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...(as like as not) a millionaire? Say No, and God pity me! Say
Yes, and I'll...

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...man, for good or
evil."

"God bless you!" cried the captain, and stood silent. "Herrick," he
added with...

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...to lay her alongside, as if she was eggs. There's a hell of a
run of...

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...three. First, you take my orders
here as cabin steward, in which case you mess with...

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...Herrick prepared for the first
time to address a crew. He thanked his stars indeed that...

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...was under all plain sail, the rudder hard
a-port, and the cheerfully-clanking windlass had brought the...

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...to watch your dead reckoning; I want every yard she
makes on every hair's-breadth of a...

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...lib._, or it won't
wash. I tell you that. And you know mighty well, you ain't...

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...horror of that grave that we've
escaped from."

"Come now, you tackle your soup; that'll fix you,"...

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...the compass and the
sails. "Where would you have been if that boom had swung out...

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...Uncle Ned was to be seen in the moonlight
nodding time; and Herrick smiled at the...

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...the tipplers.

"Him past, matey," repeated the Hawaiian.

"So much the better for you, Uncle," he replied;...

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...in hoggish slumber. Every other branch of his duty
was neglected, except maintaining a stern discipline...

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...what it is, my fine fellow,
I'll trouble you not to come the dude over me....

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...I do, 'Errick? But I tell
you, I don't 'arf like it. It looks to me...

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...to
appear. With one voice, the crew protested; ere Herrick knew what they
were doing, the cook...

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...make way
for them, Taveeta was able to perceive, in the deep shadow of the house,
the...

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...him;
no doubt also, the sense of the last cast, of the ships burned, of all
doors...

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...the sail. When that was done,
and the great trapezium of canvas had begun to draw...

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...was a question of
seconds, for the _Farallone_ drank deep of the encroaching seas. But the
hand...

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...too quick with me;
there ain't nothing wrong but the drink--it's the old story, man! Let...

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...Herrick
might say next. But Herrick had now spat his venom; his was a kindly
nature, and,...

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...calmly to burst the wire with the spike of a corkscrew.

"Do you hear me speak?"...

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...bottle was burst, and bled mere water. Deeper yet,
and they came upon a layer where...

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...had it of Uncle Ned. It seems these two unhappy
devils, Wiseman and Wishart, were drunk...

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...we were making hogs of ourselves; you'll find me turn-to
all right in future; and as...

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...winds. Squalls and
calms. D.R.: five miles. No obs. Pumps attended._ And fill in the
barometer and...

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..."You wait till I interview that cook!" he roared,
and smote the table with his fist....

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...at
his defender. As for Herrick, the successive agitations and
disappointments of the day had left him...

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...well
to windward of the archipelago in the midst of a white field of paper.

"There! you...

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...QUARTETTE




CHAPTER VII

THE PEARL-FISHER


About four in the morning, as the captain and Herrick sat together on
the...

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...of
tenancy. But the isle continued to unfold itself in joints, and to run
out in indeterminate...

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...and the present; forgot that he was menaced by a prison on the
one hand and...

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...seen beckoning with uplifted arm. The second glance identified her as
a piece of naval sculpture,...

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...no plan, no story prepared; there
was no time to make one; they were caught red-handed...

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...we
put her head for it at once, and so here we are."

"'Ope we don't intrude!"...

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...said. "And by the by, here is
a question I should have asked you when I...

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...was there, it was nowhere; it was now
so little that Herrick chid himself for an...

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...the time named, there will be no banquet; no song,
no supper, Mr. Whish!"

White birds whisked...

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...I
said, and I don't like it; here's the real, first-rate, copper-bottomed
aristocrat. '_Aw! don't know ye,...

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...you don't, there's going to be a
funeral. Is that so, Huish? does that suit you?"

"I...

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...not avail to
blister her; and was even this the end of so many adventures? he
wondered,...

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...still stood staring at the lumber, the voice
of his host sounded suddenly, and with even...

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...into the world in, and come up scatheless. What do you think the
name was?" he...

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...nice old women bobbing in the lanes, are part and
parcel of religion. But religion is...

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...from Penrhyn; like all the Penrhyn
islanders he was ill to manage; heady, jealous, violent: the...

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...no doubt?"

"I won't go so far as that," said Herrick. "I do not like Huish....

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...He had come to lure that man on board;
he was failing, even if it could...

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...a bracing of his
muscles, it was borne in on Herrick that Ada's father would find...

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...round in the verandahs lamps were lighted, so that the
place shone abroad in the dusk...

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...and
cast into the oven. To-day it is here and together in this safe;
to-morrow--to-night!--it may be...

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...of the epicure. For such
characters it is softening to eat well; doubly so to have...

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...shillings," replied Attwater.

The captain breathed hard for a moment. He reached out far and wide...

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...a lighted stage with all heaven
for spectators! And you call that solitude?"

There followed a bar...

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...and wide and do the best we could. We have gone as far
west as the...

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...did you handle that, sir?" cried the eager captain.

"Well, you see, it was a queer...

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...of Obsequiousness in the regular
course. I said nothing to him; I dismissed him; and late...

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...he repeated, and his tongue
stumbled among the words.

The captain was by him in a moment....

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...riding lamp burned in the middle
distance. For long they continued to gaze on the scene...

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...his pearls; he said
they might be dispersed before morning, and _all hung by a hair_--and
smiled...

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...not distant victim. But Davis turned on him with a
savage oath and gesture; and the...

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...dispersion of his
members, that gentleman bounded forth into space, struck the earth,
ricocheted, and brought up...

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...ducked below it from the rear, and be drawing a bead upon him at
that moment...

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...the taffrail; the crew had all turned in. The ship
had a gentle, cradling motion; at...

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...come home. A very bright planet shone before him and
drew a trenchant wake along the...

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...current set
against him like a wind in his face; he contended with it heavily,
wearily, without...

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...or Mr. Hay-Herrick?" asked
the voice of Attwater. "Your back view from my present position is
remarkably...

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...than a fowl's; and Davis, sitting on the
rail with his arm about a stay, contemplated...

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...roots of his being, or at
least from far back among his memories of childhood and...

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...it?" said he, when he had done, and looked down at
Huish, flushed and serious, and...

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...and the captain recoiled from it as from a blow.

"What for?" said he.

"Luck," said Huish....

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...'ands up
right enough." He paused. "If I can manage to sneak up nearer to him...

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...it is," cried Davis, pacing the floor; "it's there! I
draw the line at it. I...

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...pacing.

"O, you may do sentry-go till you're blue in the mug, you won't find
anythink else,"...

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...his
inside. And the only obstacle was Attwater, who had insulted him from
the first. He gave...

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...will 'old 'is
'ands over 'is 'ead from the moment he begins to approach you. I...

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...a dozen reasons,
the last of which was desire for its success. Superstition rules all
men; semi-ignorant...

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...Gawd!" apostrophising the meridian, "you're goin' to see
a rum start presently, I promise you that!"

The...

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...gangway. "Till I bring the answer, don't move a
step past this."

And he returned to where...

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...That will do," cried Attwater. "From that distance,
and keeping your hands up, like a good...

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...of
a second between the two resolves, but it was in favour of the man with
the...

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...with a singular ring in his
voice.

"Guess so," said Davis.

"So?" said Attwater, resting the butt of...

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...voice rose and fell again, and his countenance
brightened and was deformed with changing moods of...

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...don't amount to a hill of beans," said the captain, with a
sigh.

"O, come, that's rank...

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...of firearms and the cry of the dying.

The Deil's Hags was the old name. But...

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...on the Kye-skairs;
and his very doer (although lawyers have long spoons) surviving him not
long, and...

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...the sake of talking, "Keep me, Mr. Weir, and what became of
him?" and the profound...

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...by that expression which they
called in the Parliament House "Hermiston's hanging face"--they struck
mere dismay into...

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...and still comely as a
blood horse and healthy as the hill wind. High in flesh...

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...good; a minister if possible, a saint for certain. She tried to
engage his mind upon...

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...ineradicable sense of something wrong.

Mrs. Weir's philosophy of life was summed in one expression--tenderness.
In her...

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...returned with a considerable
decline in the number of his front teeth, and unregenerately boasting of
the...

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...blindness, she continued to
undermine her husband with his son. As long as Archie remained silent,
she...

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...circumvent a child with
catchwords, but it may be questioned how far it is effectual. An
instinct...

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...seeck."

"Weel, I canna see nae differ in her," returned the first. "A
fushionless quean, a feckless...

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...of her class excel and
over-abound.

Lord Hermiston sat in the saddle beholding her. Then he seemed...

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...relief. Once, a Court holiday falling opportunely, my lord had
his carriage, and drove the child...

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...and a clear head. Beyond the third
bottle, he showed the plebeian in a larger print;...

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...no more
of the Signor!"

"You and my father are great friends, are you not?" asked Archie...

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...a malady most incident to only sons. He flew his private
signal, and none heeded it;...

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...made a mistake, and my lord began to abound
in matter of offence, Archie drew himself...

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...the exercise of his
trained faculties, in the clear sight which pierced at once into the
joint...

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...Duncan Jopp enveloped and
infected the image of his judge.

Archie passed by his friends in the...

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...his father, if he must have disclaimed the
sentiment, might have owned the stentorian voice with...

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...for all that his words
were prophetic. Archie did not forget the Spec.; he put in...

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...the less tense society of others.

Archie found himself alone. The last of the faithful--or was...

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...of a
book-shop, trying to nerve himself for the approaching ordeal. My lord
and he had met...

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...never said a word, just glowered at me (if ye'll
pardon the phrase) like a wild...

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...hat, turned
round in the lighted entry, and made him an imperative and silent
gesture with his...

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...next!" cried Hermiston. "There was
nothing about your gorge rising, then?"

"That was afterwards, my lord, as...

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...a kind of a decency to be observit. Then comes the next of
it--what am I...

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...again, I pass you my word of
honour.... I should have said that I admired your...

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...he
concluded, with a freezing smile, and turned immediately to the papers
on his desk.




CHAPTER IV

OPINIONS OF...

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...servant was gone, he broke forth again at once. "Who
told my father? Who dared to...

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...There's
my shame; perhaps my sin; at least, and in the sight of God, not my
fault....

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...to me and which (if you will
listen to them dispassionately) may be the means of...

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...story had slightly rekindled Archie's interest. "I could never
deny," he began--"I mean I can conceive...

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...for--how long shall I say? when shall I have sense
enough?--ten years. Is that well?"

"It is...

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...Glenkindie, hot from a
midnight supper. I am not aware that Glenkindie was ever a beautiful
object,...

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...gallows; not content with which, I spoke the same night in a
college society against capital...

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...it would have tasked a landscape gardener
to say where policy ended and unpolicied nature began....

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...and drank deep on a
percentage of the expense, so that he was left gainer who...

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...well
spoken, but always cold, stirred the maidens of the county with the
charm of Byronism when...

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...submit to age, the gods sent this
equivocal good thing of Archie's presence. She had known...

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...drew to the time of his return,
she would steal forth to a corner of the...

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...Border Family_

Such an unequal intimacy has never been uncommon in Scotland, where the
clan spirit survives;...

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...If I buy ancestors
by the gross from the benevolence of Lyon King of Arms, my...

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...aye made it a practice to have wishen mines--just you do what I
tell ye, my...

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...race with death that the laird rode. In the mirk
night, with his broken bridle and...

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...hae your teeth, hae ye?" and rode his horse to and
fro upon that human remnant....

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...a'thegither at last
(for Dickieson had been brought in on a cart long syne), and folk...

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...for all the measure of
the devil that haunted him. He was married, and, by reason...

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...proceedings always opened to the
tune of "The Deil Fly Away with the Exciseman," and that...

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...a Christian even? He might be a Mahommedan or a
Deevil or a Fireworshipper, for what...

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...expound to him the miraculous results of compound interest,
and recommend investments. "Ay, man?" Dand would...

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...Dand, who were Tories and
patriots of the hottest quality, excused to themselves, with a certain
bashfulness,...

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...earlier Dafty having been discarded as no
longer applicable, and indeed only a reminder of misjudgment...

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...again collected by the
shrill summons of the mother; and the mother herself, by a suggestive
circumstance...

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...just mysel'! Na, they're
all damnifeed wi' the black Ellwalds. I have nae patience wi' black
folk."...

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...and severe
faces among them all, not even the solemn elders themselves, but were
capable of singular...

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...an old, black table tombstone, and he stopped to contemplate the
random apologue. They stood forth...

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...during the prayer. It was
not hypocrisy, there was no one further from a hypocrite. The...

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...used to better things
in Glasgow. Though he had never before set eyes on him, Archie...

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...not her
shoulders, which it scarcely passed--a French coat of sarsenet, tied in
front with Margate braces,...

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...too
warm." She took to reading in the metrical psalms, and then remembered
it was sermon-time. Last...

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...ever anything so indelicate, so forward,
done by a girl before? And here she was, making...

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...she interrupted. "I canna
bear the contraction."

"You forget it has a friendly sound for me. Your...

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...air wafted from
Glasgow; or perhaps it marked a stage of that dizziness of gratified
vanity, in...

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...it in a handkerchief
every Sunday after its period of service was over, and bury it...

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...Had a doctor of medicine come into that loft, he would have
diagnosed a healthy, well-developed,...

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...in her tones that made him look up.
She was pale, her eyes dark and bright;...

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...of ye, my dears! When
anything approached the serious, it became a matter for men, he...

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...through the morass, and came
to the farther end of it, where a sluggish burn discharges,...

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...It was the best thing that could happen. She would
mark a proper distance to him...

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...and he was neither
better nor worse than the average of his sex and age. He...

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...flowers, or had a
soul in her to keep her sweet. She, on her part, her...

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...she looked steadfastly before her, her knees
straight, her hands upon her knee, head cast back...

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...and on either side, Fate played his game artfully with this poor
pair of children. The...

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...conceal
the pink stockings from the eyes of the indifferent Mrs. Hob--and all
through supper, as she...

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...coach for Crossmichael. Any port in a storm! He was
manfully turning his back on the...

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...off to him by an indicated curtsey.

"But I can't imagine what business!" he reiterated.

"I suppose...

Page 189

...hizzies--a fair disgrace!" It was impossible
to hear without admiration Kirstie's graduated disgust, as she brought
forth,...

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...the cause of his ill-success lay in one trait
which was habitual and unconscious with him,...

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...who goes fishing
among the Scots peasantry with condescension for a bait will have an
empty basket...

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...He's actually sore about the way that I'm received and he's left
out in the county--actually...

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...himself. He was essentially glib, as becomes
the young advocate, and essentially careless of the truth,...

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...any
one, it was the Marquis de Talleyrand-Perigord. It was on the occasion
of Archie's first absence...

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...one thing he was his father's son. He
had a strong sense that his house was...

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...cognate subject. What was Archie's
little game? Why did he shun Frank's company? What was he...

Page 197

...he observed, on the way home.

"Who?" said Archie.

"O, the girl you're looking at--aren't you? Forward...

Page 198

...a safe business. Not safe, my boy," said he.

"What?" said Archie.

"Well, it's your own fault...

Page 199

...I
can do so much justice to your motives. But I will hear no more of...

Page 200

...is the price paid by age for unseasonable ardours of feeling. It
must have been so...

Page 201

...to her
last link with life and brightness and love; and behind and beyond, she
saw but...

Page 202

...the
manner of the unhappy. He turned round as she came in, and showed her a
pale...

Page 203

...twenty
yet----" She paused and sighed. "Clean and caller, wi' a fit like the
hinney bee," she...

Page 204

...her comely head, like the
rays of an eternal youth; the pure colour had risen in...

Page 205

...daft wife that loves ye, and
that kenned your mither. And for His name's sake keep...

Page 206

...steps away, not less white than herself, and
holding up his hand with a gesture of...

Page 207

...matter of fact, not any one had talked to Christina on the matter;
and she strenuously...

Page 208

...her large-minded
madness, to go on and to reck nothing of the future. But these
unfinished references,...

Page 209

...with it!" she repeated, springing to her feet.
"A'body at Hermiston's free to pass their opinions...

Page 210

..."Weir of Hermiston" breaks off. They were dictated, I
believe, on the very morning of the...

Page 211

...He is tried before
his own father, the Lord Justice-Clerk, found guilty, and condemned to
death. Meanwhile...

Page 212

...on the best
legal authority of Scotland that no judge, however powerful either by
character or office,...

Page 213

...its
course when evidence incriminating his own son was unexpectedly brought
forward?

Whether the final escape and union...

Page 214

...are capable hardy folks
too, who might very well succeed. Why should they not then? Why...

Page 215

...a lighter vein once or twice in fiction--as for instance in
"The Story of a Lie,"...

Page 216

...case of middle age
in one of my stories, 'The Justice-Clerk.' The case is that of...

Page 217

...premier--or since you are so much involved in the British drama,
let me say my heavy...

Page 218

..."Strong built and dark, with rough eyebrows,
powerful eyes, threatening lips, and a low growling voice,...

Page 219

...writer's
early experience, the answer, I think, must be in the negative. Rather
it is distilled from...

Page 220

... bauchles, _brogues, old shoes_.

bauld, _bold_.

bees in their bonnet, _eccentricities_.

...

Page 221

... hypothec, _lii. in Scots law the furnishings of a house, and formerly
...

Page 222

...steik, _to shut_.

stirk, _a young bullock_.

stockfish, _hard, savourless_.

sugar-bool, _sugar-plum_.

...