The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 22 Juvenilia and Other Papers

By Robert Louis

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... III. THE MARCH OF THE REBELS ...

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... 45
III. DEBATING SOCIETIES ...

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...LORD LYTTON'S "FABLES IN SONG" ...

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... ...

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...parts. Those of
them who arose above contempt or scandal were men of such violent
tempers that...

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...of doors, and then his tenants were
fined till they too were almost ruined. As a...

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...with them and thresh his corn. The
field was a certain distance out of the clachan,...

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...was brought into Dumfries, who affirmed stoutly that he
had been shot while refusing to sign...

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...allegiance, and all lodgers were commanded to give in their
names. Sharpe, surrounded with all these...

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...conversion, I said it wold be
hard to turne a Turner. Bot because I founde them...

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...they had just left on the morning of this great
wapinshaw, they were charged--awful picture of...

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...[10] Wodrow, pp. 19, 20.

[11] "A Hind Let Loose," p. 123.

[12]...

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...that landscape, over which, as over his life and his
cause, the shadows of night and...

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...is
likely, that Paton was putting in larger balls, hid behind his servant,
who was killed.[20]

Meantime the...

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...marched within
his ranks. The old man knew it all. That martial and triumphant strain
was the...

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...affixed at Hamilton, and Captain
Arnot's sett on the Watter Gate at Edinburgh. The armes of...

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...drink! Farewell sun, moon, and stars!--Welcome God and
Father! Welcome sweet Jesus Christ, the Mediator of...

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...day to jeer and to mock, to execrate and to contemn, the noble
band of Covenanters,--though...

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...my companion, not from regard or even from interest,
but from a very natural feeling, inseparable...

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...in his waistcoat pocket, and can make
himself a god as often and as long as...

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...utter stillness the rumbling of a
carriage a very great way off, that drew near, and...

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...There is now an end of mystery and
fear. Like the knocking at the door in...

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...was forgotten in their electorship.
Politics had engulfed the narrower economy of gravedigging. "Na, na,"
said the...

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...see through open windows into miserable rooms where whole families
were born and fed, and slept...

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...wet grass and looked long and silently through
the clouded shade, while the second stood above...

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...the want that ate into her heart. I think I know a
little of what that...

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...to pay her a short
visit. How bright these visits seem as she looks forward to...

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...lamp, with a brown greatcoat buttoned round him and
his whole face convulsed. It seemed as...

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...and found himself seriously
embroiled with the powers that were. There appeared in No. XVI. a...

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..."Carriage Entrance" was posted above the main arch, on what the
writer pleases to call "coarse,...

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...swore, was not
often tipsy, and bought the _Lapsus Linguae_."

The _Medical_, again, "wore a white greatcoat,...

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...hope to give a glance at the individualities of
the present, and see whether the cast...

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...dry morsel, run their own little heresy as a proof of
independence; and deny one of...

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...a livelihood, which they have considerately embraced
and which they solemnly pursue. "Labour's pale priests," their...

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...feet in the
"College Anthem" have beguiled so many weary hours and added a pleasant
variety to...

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...whose inherent attraction is allowed to condense them
into little knots and coteries. Our last snowball...

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...broad a field for your Jack-of-all-Trades;
and, from beautifully utilitarian reasons, he makes his choice, draws
his...

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...same room
with you; or, even if you do, you will probably think the performance
little to...

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...people who, having nothing
to say, are cursed with a facility and an unhappy command of...

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...we have been railing
against in the jeremiad of our last "College Paper"--particularly in the
field of...

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...speaking,
of course, until some remarks of, etc.), arguing out, I say, his own
_coached-up_ subject without...

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...afterwards the great hall above the
library, might be the place of meeting. There would be...

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...the hypochondriacal, out of solicitude for their
health, or the frugal, out of care for their...

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...the outward and visible sign of your snobbery, or from
the exposed gingham of its cover...

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...had occasion to notice; and yet
we challenge the candid reader to call it in question....

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...25, 1894.]




V

THE PHILOSOPHY OF NOMENCLATURE

"How many Caesars and Pompeys, by mere inspirations of...

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...course of your earthly fortunes. But the last name,
overlooked by Mr. Shandy, is no whit...

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...intimation of his death bids fair to carry laughter into many a
home.

So much for people...

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...or untoward
appellation shall have ceased from off the face of the earth.




NOTES AND ESSAYS CHIEFLY...

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...large for the eye to encompass. But this is no more the
case when our recollections...

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...be no
empty boast upon my grave. If I desire to live long, it is that...

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..."Heaven forgive hims!" She had
been a camp-follower in her younger days, and she was never...

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...like its retrospect.

Not far from Dunoon is Rosemore, a house in which I had spent...

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...constraint? Is
that little turfed slope the huge and perilous green bank down which I
counted it...

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...how a missionary once
took him on his knee and told him about missionary work, and...

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...a keener pain, a
more intolerable and utter prostration. It is quite possible, and even
comparatively easy,...

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...even
going again--unless----): and I have been twice and once upon the
...

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...and take up the
thread of my discourse where it first distinctly issues from the limbo
of...

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...within its privet
hedge. I was pleased to fancy this an inn, and drew little etchings...

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...as men always do in such circumstances, and agreed that I was to
leave for Keswick...

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...that they put all the best
writing and speaking to the blush; as it is, I...

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...such men for their excellence, and wisdom, and prudence. I
find myself facing as stoutly as...

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...very often the case) through the agency
of a gig accident, and that, after having examined...

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...break the tedium. A sudden
and violent squall of wind sundered the low underwood, and at...

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...he produced
poem after poem, written on the backs of letters or hotel-bills; and
nothing could be...

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...big drum in the orchestra, but day by day to
teach himself some new beauty--to experience...

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...and
placid agricultural districts, familiarity will bring into relief many
things worthy of notice, and urge them...

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...bends, and cunningly adapts itself to
the inequalities of the land before our eyes. We remember,...

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...along a good, well-made road in an open
vehicle, we shall experience this sympathy almost at...

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...the dweller in places more populous. We remember
standing beside a countryman once, in the mouth...

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..._there_ is changed to _here_, all is afterwards as it was before,
and we stand in...

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...two, particularly, the rhythm was sometimes broken by an excess of
energy, as though the pleasure...

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...merriment of people looking on critically; the music said something
to her, and her whole spirit...

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...forwards in a pretty flutter of indecision, putting up her
shoulders and laughing with the embarrassed...

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...little child; and yet this pleasure is surely as legitimate as
another. There is much of...

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...more perfect age
before they sit for their portraits.




V

ON THE ENJOYMENT OF UNPLEASANT PLACES

(1874)


It is a...

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...still embellish a place with some attraction
of romance. We may learn to go far afield...

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...are sometimes as beautiful, often more picturesque, than the
shows of the open air, and they...

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...North; the earth seemed to know that it was naked, and
was ashamed and cold.

It seemed...

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...sequester'd nook,
Still as a shelter'd place when winds blow loud!"

I remember meeting...

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...a window, shot the other as he stood
in his own doorway. There is something in...

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...of that
great field of stationary blue, was as the wind of a butterfly's wing.
The placidity...

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...la nature que lorsque nous nous
efforcons d'exprimer sobrement et simplement l'impression que nous...

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...into the distance, and shows him the far-off spires of some
city, or a range of...

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...to
mass themselves together, and lay thin and straight, like clouds, upon
the limit of one's view....

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...else was deeply imbued with the sentiment of the later
year. There was no stir of...

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...man would not stand in the Prince's name,
he took no note of him, but let...

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...the thin golden sunshine, I saw in
front of me a donkey tied to a tree....

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...of his behaviour, and the impertinence that
inspired his whole face as he curled up his...

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...was fair-day in Great Missenden. There were three stalls set
up _sub jove_, for the sale...

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...Caliph
and the serviceable Giaffar. It is a salutary exercise, besides; it is
salutary to get out...

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...fields were exposed before me
like a map, and I could see all that bustle of...

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...pleasant groupings and broke the light
up pleasantly. Sometimes there would be a colonnade of slim,...

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...in a wide flood of daylight on to a circular lawn. It
was here that the...

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...to leave "Peacock Farm"--for so the place is called, after
the name of its splendid pensioners--and...

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...harmonious
for being somewhat faded. The corner cupboard was agreeable in design;
and there were just the...

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...this little damsel in the morning, and professed much
interest in her dolls, and an impatient...

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...they were, and wherefore they went singing at so late an hour. One
can rarely be...

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...of some men's lives, that we see more to lament for in
a life cut off...

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...as
usual, and the air filled, as usual, with the carolling of larks; I
heard shots fired...

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...seemed to skirt the shores of creation
and void space.

The snow crunched underfoot, and at farms...

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...or so of fishers' houses. Hard by, a few
shards of ruined castle overhang the sea,...

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...other hand as they
drank; and in less time than it takes me to write these...

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...fell out of the cart; indeed, he was only
saved by a companion, who either had...

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...a large city
than here in a country place betwixt a village and a town. I...

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...borrowed some little pocketful of capital, and then, step by
step, in courage, thrift, and industry,...

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...at springtime, when the gipsies' song is afloat in
the amethyst evening, we can catch their...

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...a field by himself, capered and whinnied as if
the spring were in him.

The road from...

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...well off nowadays, and not by any means
overworked; but somehow you always see in them...

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...and cold feet. And perhaps, as he raises
his head and sees the forest lying like...

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...only warming
him with fallen wood, but giving him shelter in days of sore trouble,
when my...

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...faithful regiments
burned that memorial of so much toil and glory on the Grand Master's
table, and...

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...a
raw mutton-chop, in which Such-a-one knocked a hole last summer with no
worse a missile than...

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...comely faces and toilettes
ranged about the wall. The bowl is lit, and the punch is...

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...wakened before by the visit of some adventurous pigeon, you
will be wakened as soon as...

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...as
one of the plagues of Egypt. Ants swarm in the hot sand; mosquitoes
drone their nasal...

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...defined with pre-Raphaelite
minuteness. And a sorry figure they make out there in the sun, like
misbegotten...

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...up hill and down dale, and by beech and pine wood,
in the cheerful morning sunshine....

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...French mind, I am rather led to
think it does. And Grez, when we get there,...

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...fellowship.

Half the party are to return to-night with the wagonette; and some of
the others, loath...

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...the colour is washed out of the green and
golden landscape of last night, as though...

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...are as wet as shipwrecked sailors. They cannot see out of their
eyes for the drift,...

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...in rocky clearings, the
delicate, snow-white trunks of birches, spreading out into snow-white
branches yet more delicate,...

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...there are moments when
pleasure draws to the verge of fear. You listen and listen for...

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...woman
laden with a fagot of chips, and the little ones hauling a long branch
behind them...

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...Apollo or Mars.


MORALITY

Strange indeed is the attraction of the forest for the minds of men....

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...hid. With every hour you change. The air
penetrates through your clothes, and nestles to your...

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...vagabond, consumed by a fever of the feet, cut off from all
near touch of human...

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...crash
his arrows; here, in the farthest glade, sounds the gallop of the pale
horse. But he...

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...passages of massive and memorable writing as appeared, here and
there, in the earlier work, and...

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...which is a fable in
all points except that it is not altogether fabulous. And this...

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...then
long neglected; and, behold! the letters are as faded and sorrowfully
disappointing as the icicle. This...

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...the point of audacity with which
the fabulist was wont to mock at his readers. And...

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...speech of the rain is charming:

"Lo, with my little drops I bless again
...

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...unattainable is not truly unattainable, when we
can make the beauty of it our own. Indeed,...

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... "Did print
The azure air with pines."

Moreover, I do...

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...a little irritating; for when we think of other passages so much
more finished and adroit,...

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...of Banquo joined the party, and after having sat helpless a
while at a table, was...

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...thing not to be
forgotten; and when he spoke of his hangman's hands he seemed to...

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...he
may move untroubled in this element of blood.

In the fifth act we see this lowest...

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...above fate by a demoniacal energy, a lust of wounds and
slaughter. Even after he meets...

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...as well, and
we should be better able to follow and enjoy an admirable work of
dramatic...

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...of Bunyan is widely different; and yet in this also Allegory,
poor nymph, although never quite...

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...as I had almost called them; with his taste in weapons;
his delight in any that...

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...a warrant--dead and stiff like granite;
nay (and here the artist must enhance upon the symbolism...

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...Thus to provide! That I should be forgiven!
And dwell already the next...

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...upon a
cliffy mountain, the radiant temple beams upon them over deep, subjacent
woods; they, behind a...

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...Lord. "Carried to Another
Place," the artist enigmatically names his plate--a terrible design.

Wherever he touches on...

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...vainly pouring buckets on the flame, and "The Oil
of Grace" on the other, where the...

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...the pilgrim, his shoulder advanced,
his tail writhing in the air, his foot ready for a...

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...a grudge; nor can I dismiss in any
other words than those of gratitude a series...

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...gained a great victory, in spite
of an opposition neither very logical nor very generous; you...

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...have sufficed for the great
dogmatic battles of the Continent. It would be difficult to exaggerate
the...

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...is your intention, on the earliest public opportunity,
to make some advance. Without doubt, it is...

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...with all consideration. I do not pretend
to lay before you any definite scheme of action;...

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...to the world that Christianity is
something more than a verbal system. In the lapse of...

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...they will be quick also to follow your
example. But the sign should come from you....

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...obviousness. We are fired with anger against
those who make themselves the spokesmen of plain obligations;...

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...have here a question before them, on the
answering of which, as I still think, many...

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...rare,
quaint, comical, and necessary articles at less than twice its market
value. (_He sounds another flourish_.)

_The...

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...Sir, the pith of the whole device is to
take that money from you.

_The Ingenuous Public._--True....

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...the surf doth break and roar
Along bleak miles of moonlit shore,
...

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... This is the man,
Who gives up all that is lovely in living
...

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...with strict economy with
oil lights, in the following manner:--

[Illustration: Fig. 1.]

In Fig. 1, AAA represents...

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...of the method that I propose is this, that while we are
able to produce a...

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...a part of the earth's surface slightly elevated above
the rest, or as a diffused and...

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...the radiating
leaf-surface a stratum of comparatively stagnant air, protected from
many sudden variations of temperature, and...

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...temperatures of the tree and of the air had come to an
equilibrium. A similar difference...

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... 31.46 deg.

A moment's comparison of the two columns will make the principle
apparent. The temperature...

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... 65.66 deg. 70.70...

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...not
occur: the variations follow each other without interval; and the
slow-conducting wood is never allowed enough...

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...bad conductor. But this is precisely the same conclusion as we have
already arrived at with...

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...less sunshine, and ranged sometimes as high as seven degrees. After
this the difference kept declining...

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...and vexatious. Even in
South America, with extremely favourable conditions, the result is far
from being definite....

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...Until we know, for example, somewhat more of
the comparative radiant powers of different soils, we...

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...minimum thermometers in three different
classes of situation--_videlicet_, in the areas selected for plantation
themselves, at places...

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...him and beholding
at each repetition the same field of wood and snow from the same...

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...at the second stampede of joedellers
you find your modest inspiration fled. Or you may only...

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...To trace the fires of the sunrise as they
pass from peak to peak, to see...

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...the vast and dismal
moorlands of Wyoming, a few snowy mountain summits along the southern
sky. It...

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...road, or skating
on the ice-rinks, possibly to music, or sitting under sunshades by the
door of...

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...mouth to smile:
such is the winter daytime in the Alps. With the approach of evening...

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...in the interest of their actors, to raise a
mysterious item, the _Kur-taxe_, which figures heavily...

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...with laughter when it is offered by an
unknown professional and no money has been taken...

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...all manner of variety in the nature of the tracks, some miles
in length, others but...

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...one thing is undeniable--that in the rare air,
clear, cold, and blinding light of Alpine winters,...

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...all, you have gone no nearer to explain or even to
qualify the delicate exhilaration that...

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...it is not he, it is the Alps, who
are to blame. He is not, perhaps,...

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...on mine,
all the pocket-money derived from my publishing ventures as well as a
considerable part of...

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...vast army could force it to fall back in the full tide
of success. A well-devised...

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...difficulty and tried to find a substitute
for the deadly and discriminating pop-gun. It was all...

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...back until the military news was staled by time or were guardedly
communicated with blanks for...

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...force,
without artillery, is alone in the neighbourhood of Cinnabar, and some
of that has fallen back...

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...was an airy, amiable, affected creature, the very
soul of bravery and levity. He had risen...

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...on our own side of the river.
All this through mere chuckle-headed incompetence and the neglect...

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...men are
_hors de combat_; and the chivalrous Potty is himself seriously hurt.
This has cast a...

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...fault
was Lafayette's, who was in chief command, and was present in Grierson
itself at the time...

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...our
own side; and next of the appearance of a large body of troops at Yolo,
in...

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...correspondents to speak for themselves,
reserving our judgment with a heavy heart. Piffle has the sympathy...

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...bridge over the Glendarule not swept by our artillery.
Delafield has had another partial success; with...

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...is the result produced by the turning movement at
Yolo, General Stevenson's long inactivity in Sandusky,...

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...for our small army; yet
the good done by that expedition is not wiped away by...

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...main body on Scarlet, and with a single corps
on Glentower. Cinnabar was occupied on the...

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...the 17th.




THE DAVOS PRESS


_In the Reproductions which follow of Moral Emblems, etc., by...

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...Author._
Davos-Platz.




_Chapter I._


In this forest...

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...Indian struck a light with _two sticks_. They follow him into this
cave for about a...

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... Some not.

Some like to laugh,
...

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...print
Bound on the book to see what's in't!
O, like these pretty...

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...of their business.




Today is published by _S. L. Osbourne & Co._

...

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...By that romantic riverside.
Soon as the evening hours decline
Tranquilly he'll return...

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...while unmoved their sleep they take,
We mourn for their dear Captain's sake,
...

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...HERIOT ROW.

[It was only by the kindness of Mr. CRERAR of Kingussie that we are...

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...as you."

"Discourteous tree" the first replied,
"The tempest in my boughs had...

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...angler plies his line and rod,
The clodpole stands with many a nod,--
...

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...a go of brandy;
And all the happy hills of home
Vanish beyond...

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...That threw them in each other's way;
Glad were their mutual salutations,
Long...

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...The smiling chemist tapped his brow.
'Rob,' he replied,'this throbbing brain
Still worked...

Page 218

...hand,
He by the foreman took his stand,
With boisterous voice, with eagle...

Page 219

...A plastered skeleton of lath,
Looked forward to a day of wrath.
In...

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...it solid lath and mortar.
In all, I was the single actor--
And...