The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 18

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

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... ...

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... 105

XIV....

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... ...

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... 278


PART V.--THE GILBERTS--APEMAMA

I....

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...adventures in the form of letters
for serial publication. The plan by and by changed in...

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...BEING AN ACCOUNT OF EXPERIENCES AND OBSERVATIONS IN THE MARQUESAS,
PAUMOTUS AND GILBERT ISLANDS...

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...all our contemporaries, and yet as remote in thought and habit
as Rob Roy or Barbarossa,...

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...of cliff and cloud, our haven lay
concealed; and somewhere to the east of it--the only...

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...surrounded with what seemed a garden. These conspicuous
habitations, that patch of culture, had we but...

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...board!" I own I was inspired with
sensible repugnance; even with alarm. The ship was manifestly...

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...nothing more natural than these apprehensions, nor
anything more groundless. In my experience of the islands,...

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...just been heard--a
trial for infanticide against an ape-like native woman; and the audience
were smoking cigarettes...

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...of tattooing, in the other a cherished costume,
proscribed. In each a main luxury cut off:...

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...head in the islands; and not only inclined
me to view my fresh acquaintances with favour,...

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...of these can be compared with the Marquesan
_paepae-hae_, or dwelling platform. The paepae is an...

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...and New Yo'ko. In a Highland hamlet, quite out of reach of any
tourist, I have...

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...the head of the beach, a
magnificent figure of a man, magnificently tattooed; and it was...

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...This reserve and dignity is the finest trait of the
Marquesan.


FOOTNOTE:

[1] Where that word...

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...over all.

The glow continued and increased, the business, from the main part,
ceased before it had...

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...of puraos, and over these again
palms brandished their bright fans, as I have seen a...

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...the grief and terror of that time, it is not
unlikely he went mad, an infirmity...

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...by a natural enough but quite unpardonable blunder, we
refused the pig. Had Tari been a...

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...it was too cold, and went through
an elaborate performance, shutting out draughts, and crouching over...

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...the last. The tribe of Hapaa is said to
have numbered some four hundred when the...

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...lovely and valuable trees,--orange, breadfruit,
mummy-apple, coco, the island chestnut, and for weeds, the pine and...

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...and rises with
him from his bed; he lives and breathes under a shadow of mortality
awful...

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...braiding old men's beards. From all this
it may be conceived how easily they meet death...

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...in the day; yet when we arrived, the
trader's store-house was entirely empty; and before we...

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...and popoi were indispensable ingredients. So
far this is clear enough. But here Tari went on...

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...for the
teeming people, and the annals of the past are gloomy with famine and
cannibalism. Among...

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...he may be compared with the Bacchus of the
ancients. His zealots sailed from bay to...

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...Samoans, who have never suffered?

Those who are acquainted only with a single group are apt...

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...they have been, upon the
whole, extended. The Polynesian falls easily into despondency:
bereavement, disappointment, the fear...

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...of the missionary. In Polynesian islands he easily obtains
pre-eminent authority; the king becomes his _maire...

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...adventurers, and we may almost say the business of
the missionaries, to deride and infract even...

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...table, skilled in the use of
knife and fork, a brave figure when he shouldered a...

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...horseback_--a witty and a wicked cut. A nickname in Polynesia
destroys almost the memory of the...

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...estate: the commons might be sots, but
the chief could not stoop so low. And not...

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...trained
in the bracing, practical thought of ancient Rome; with them the idea of
law has not...

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...case of some one wishing to
enforce them, rights of private property. Thus a man, weary...

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...your sleep will be uneasy; in the morning,
swelling and a dark discoloration will have attacked...

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...to-day--and was
probably always--far from universal. Hell at home is a strong deterrent
with some; a passing...

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...way in to skirt a point that is embayed. It seems that, as
they can never...

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...the course. For arithmetic all island people have a natural
taste. In Hawaii they make good...

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...whole year's work;
they complain particularly of the heartless indifference of the girls.
Out of so many...

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...conceive with wonder that men should think it worth
while to toil so many days, and...

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...a lay brother, a type of all that
is most sound in France, with a broad,...

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...beat of ninety miles against a heavy sea.
It was what is called a good passage,...

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...sentinel islets of the entry, it came in gusts from seaward.
Heavy and dark clouds impended...

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...day except with laughter. For my part, I could never see the man
without a kind...

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...the calaboose at Tai-o-hae
does a good business. But some of its occupants were gardening at...

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...not
merely useful, they are almost essential to the French existence. With a
people incurably idle, dispirited...

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...with which the French
agent of police so readily secures a prisoner. But whether physical or
moral,...

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...of beginning it, at a time when
his plantations flourished in the Marquesas, and he found...

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...as "_Madame Vaekehu, Grande Chefesse_." His son
(natural or adoptive, I know not which), Stanislao Moanatini,...

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...of French; and I do not
know that she seemed clever. An exquisite, kind refinement, with...

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...for and taken in war; perhaps, being so great a lady, she
had sat on the...

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...of distant bays and islands
encamp upon their graves. The decline of the dance Stanislao especially
laments....

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...us so often to the map. But it is of our parting that I keep...

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...with that of others, I pity their fortune, and
praise mine: the circumstance cannot change what...

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...the refusal of gifts; and it is as natural for the islander to bring
a gift...

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...never addressed the young lady
except as his mother, and closed his letters with the formalities...

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...and tormented with bed-sores and
sciatica. Here he lay two months without complaint; and on the...

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...his policy to live among the natives like an elder
brother; to follow where he could;...

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...During my stay at
Tai-o-hae, the time of the yearly holiday came round at the girls'
school;...

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...thing. He say Missa Whela, 'Now, you go quick.'
They jump in whale-boat. 'Now you low!'...

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...God, Jehovah, in His triune character (Father, Son, and Holy
Ghost), one-three, three-one. If...

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...(I am told) rolls them into the
sun to burst; he is the terror of the...

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...of this paragraph. And so with the
island cannibals. They were not cruel; apart from this...

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...vegetables can no longer satisfy, and his
soul, like those of the Hebrews in the desert,...

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...retired to his own house to
consummate the rite in secret, carrying his proportion of the...

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...tropical showers succeeded
bursts of sweltering sunshine. The green pathway of the road wound
steeply upward. As...

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...returned to his
roof, the laymen came forth, and in the morning the number of the
victims...

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...and
parcelled out with several wells and small enclosures. No trace remained
of any superstructure, and the...

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...call emphatically
human--denying the honour of that name to those who lack them. In such
feasts--particularly where...

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...alps. In the morning, when the sun falls
directly on their front, they stand like a...

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...a sudden and
distant drum-beat, the surf would burst in a sea-cave.

At the upper end of...

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...of the captain, because, though the French
had the most ships, he had the more money.

He...

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...it on the wheel.
While the axe was grinding, a friendly native whispered Mr. Stewart to
have...

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...in the cotton-house at
night in a rampart of bales, and (what was their best defence)
ostentatiously...

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...warriors from the opposite island of
Tauata slew, and carried home and ate, and were thereupon...

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...was sleeping off his debauch. The
assailants were fully exposed, the interior of the hut quite...

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...of epithet, which I neglect to
reproduce.

Perhaps, if Captain Hart's affairs had continued to prosper, his
popularity...

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...He was
from Tauata, whither he returned the same night in an outrigger, daring
the deep with...

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...near one end of the bay, in a wreck of a house,
and waited on by...

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...one
Among the literary men
That this...

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...the essential diet. Some salted fish I
therefore brought him, and along with that a glass...

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...would nod across to me as
one Tahuku to another, or, crossing the cockpit, study for...

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...attitude of the intelligent and the polite. And we, on the
other hand--who had yet the...

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...a gendarme. To the Protestant there is always something
embarrassing in the eagerness with which grown...

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...of nondescript greenery
enshrining us from above; and thither, after a brief absence, he brought
us a...

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...smoke of household fires. Here and
there the hills of foliage would divide, and our eye...

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...my language; and I could not but think how handsome she
must have been in these...

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...things are not done
without result. I have spoken already of the regard of Marquesans for
the...

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...thought to be insulted, and the pair made
common cause like brothers. At home the inequality...

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...the part of Paaaeua it was an affair of social ambition;
when he agreed to receive...

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...idle,
and the more affectionate he finds his native relatives. Most men thus
circumstanced contrive to buy...

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...a worldly visitor: "Go to
the theatre if you like, but, by your leave, not from...

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...the ancient and singularly unbecoming robes of tapa; and
Father Orens in the midst of a...

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...the village, and detested him on sight;
there was something indescribably raffish in his looks and...

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...presently the _Casco_ heeled down
to her day's work; the whale-boat, quite outstripped, clung for a...

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...none
the wiser. The reputation of the place is consequently infamous;
insurance offices exclude it from their...

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...at last awoke me, to see all the eastern
heaven dyed with faint orange, the binnacle...

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...long months upon low islands; I know the tedium of
their undistinguished days; I know the...

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...not more
than five minutes the railway embankment had been lost to view and the
surf to...

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...vegetable,
and no sound but the continuous grumble of the surf. In silence and
desertion these fair...

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...was but a pistol-shot from the capital city of the archipelago.
But the life of an...

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...indeed,
where the reef carried an inlet, like a signet-ring upon a finger, there
would be a...

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...coal
of cocoa-nut husk, a relic of the evening kitchen. Crickets sang; some
shrill thing whistled in...

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...they viewed the on-coming breakers,
till one of the captains clapped suddenly his hand before his...

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...on the
window-sill. Insect life is sometimes dense; a cloud of mosquitoes, and,
what is far worse,...

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...variety and brilliancy of hues. The reef itself has no
passage of colour but is imitated...

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...set as close as three or even four to the square inch. Even in the
lagoon,...

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...in the
back quarters; and, when we visited the Government bungalow, that Mr.
Donat, acting Vice-Resident, greeted...

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...affirm he was well qualified for either part. For that of convict,
first of all, by...

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...of a mind more
ecclesiastical; he loved to dispute and to inform himself of doctrine
and the...

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...and gave us a
side look on some native life. Every morning, as soon as he...

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...traffic woke with the reviving
breeze; and among the rest one Francois, a half-blood, set sail...

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...they came; the flesh of the woman, whom
Mrs. Stevenson helped to shift, was cold as...

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...lean body spoke
for her with indignant eloquence. "My chest!" it cried, with a stress on
the...

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...but from the perils that
awaited him on shore. Even to this day, in certain outlying...

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...at ease in the water--working at times with
their pipes lighted, the smoker at times submerged...

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...leprosy with comparative
indifference, elephantiasis with disproportionate fear. But, unlike
indeed to the Tahitian, their alarm puts...

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...months later I had an opportunity to consult an
orthodox fellow-countryman, an old dissenting Highlander, long...

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...side, a pleasing feature.
More important is the fact that all the faithful enjoy office; perhaps
more...

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...singing hymns," said he.
"Yes," she returned, "but listen again! Do you not hear something
supernatural?" His...

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...are honest,
well-intentioned ladies, some of them embarrassed by their weird
inheritance. And indeed the trouble caused...

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...me (I know not how) on thoughts of
superstition. I was barefoot, I observed my steps...

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...party.

On the morning of 17th September the sufferer died, and, time pressing,
he was buried the...

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...read from Job, the prayers had been rehearsed, the
grave was filled, the mourners straggled homeward....

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...nothing. And lo! in the whole affair
there was no question whether of tenderness or piety,...

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...fear I am not wholly
frank, often leading the way with stories of my own, and...

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...had answered: and before I was done his voice sounded shrill
with terror of the coming...

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...is something wrong about your graveyard," said I, "which you must
attend to, or it may...

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...which there was silently joined a
great company of cats of every hue conceivable; then these...

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...one of his divers flee from a similar sound, in similar
unaffected panic, on the same...

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...thoroughly and finding it quite perfect; as he was so engaged
the wind puffed out his...

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...my informant
argued, is suggestive. For why should a mere meteor frequent the altars
of abominable gods?...

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...is a man not certainly averse to
superstition, but he keeps his head, and takes a...

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...he declares the souls of the unburied
were only wanderers in limbo, lacking an entrance to...

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...notoriously clannish; I
understood them to wait upon and to enlighten kinsfolk only, and that
the medium...

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...and when his child was born he must be shamed for lack of
gifts. It was...

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...resume
the occupations of their life on earth, it would be wearisome to tell.
One story I...

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...women
with long red hair are seen to rise and bathe; only (timid as mice) on
the...

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...still hidden; there, too, his reputed
treasures, spoils of a buccaneer, lie, and are still vainly...

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...an unheard-of hamlet,
rather than a visit to one of the admitted marvels of the world....

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...appearance as a shipwrecked picnic.

The purser spied and introduced me to my host, ex-judge Nahinu,...

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...his grown daughters, strapping lassies; his young hopefuls,
misbehaving at a meal or perfunctorily employed upon...

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...constituencies
to refuse so great a charmer. I understood but a few dozen words, yet I
heard...

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...in specie; at any
moment the messenger might slip, the money-bag roll down a thousand feet
of...

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...a certain hire under the sun in his
plantation, and the work is all transacted by...

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...called the Waoakua, region of gods and
goblins; other names, some apparently involving thoughts of solitude...

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...of the other I
made out. It was _Little Loo_. Happy Mr. Clark Russell, making life
pleasant...

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...down so abruptly, that
in one place my saddle-girth was burst and we must halt for...

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...be, I thought--and yet it must; it was this dubiety which
carried me across the threshold;...

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...with green lianas, and pierced with the apertures of half a
hundred caves. Two of these...

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...my
companion from wayside houses. With one little maid, knotting her gown
about her in embarrassment so...

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...bring the relics of the kings from their long repose at
Honaunau. First to the keeper's...

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...in the Gilberts: where
their name is now invariably used for a mosquito-net. But the refuge...

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...so in the presence of the vestiges of Rome; I found it so again in
the...

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...be easy to
identify. It was this missionary's habit to go walking in the morning
ere the...

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...circle of
Kamehameha; for no portent followed this defiance of the gods, and none
of the transgressors...

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...she shared; and put away at their
command her second husband. To the end of a...

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...habit; and when it came to
a sister for a rival, her jealousy overflowed. She fled...

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...mournful women--mothers and wives; some
stripling girls. A day or two, for instance, after the man...

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...must go alone or with a single
relative; and the native instinctively resists the separation as...

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...from me at last," and so on without end.

The thought of the girl so early...

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...came
singly and unattended; the elder first; the girl a little after, tricked
out in a red...

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...The soldier from the war returns,
The sailor from the main:

but not the...

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...to beach. In both, a coarse kind of
_taro_ thrives; its culture is a chief business...

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...may thus be said to have taken Butaritari by surprise. A few
inhabitants were still abroad...

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...with coloured advertisements
and cuts from the illustrated papers. Even before the gate some of the
treasures...

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...a cutlass was leaned against a
pillar: the armoury of these drowsy musketeers. At the far...

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...memory of residents.

On the death of king Tetimararoa, Tebureimoa's father, Nakaeia, the
eldest son, succeeded. He...

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...the
involuntary criminal. But during the remainder of that reign he must
lurk and be hid by...

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...seventeen queens, who toiled and
waded there like fisher lasses; but the man who was to...

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...the influence of Maka. Calumny, or rather
caricature, was called in use; a spoken cartoon ran...

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...shuttlecock of orators; and
the reader has seen the remains of him in his summer parlour...

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...in the memory of Mr. Corpse;
and since he studied them in the brother he betrayed,...

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...III

AROUND OUR HOUSE


When we left the palace we were still but seafarers ashore; and within
the...

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...singer breaks
from the thick leaves; from farther on a second tree-top answers; and
beyond again, in...

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...be left
destitute. "The perilous, hairbreadth ridi" was our word for it; and in
the conflict that...

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...its cool verandahs, its bookshelves, its comfortable
furniture, could not be rivalled nearer than Jaluit or...

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...has
singled out with the skill of a collector, and planted in the soil of
his original...

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...liquor and tobacco, returned to
find his verandah littered with cigarettes and his parlour horrible with
bottles....

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...house I lodged; and the likeness, and the difference,
and the series of years and deaths,...

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...revolution, and which to-day, in a man
so lively and engaging, amazes the beholder. No song,...

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...drink was besides
forbidden equally by the law of the land and the canons of the...

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...now it was easy to exaggerate. Yet the conduct of
drunkards even at home is always...

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...guns and epaulettes; the colours stooped under the
gateway; majesty followed in his uniform bedizened with...

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...said; to-day it was beyond his power, to-day he durst not.
"Is that royal?" cried indignant...

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...of one ear.

So the brawl passed with no other casualty than might seem comic to...

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...day's
events. The night was exquisite, the silence enchanting; yet as I lay in
my hammock looking...

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...the town slept. Even the few who were awake, mostly women
and children, held their peace...

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...that we would see our Chinaman draw
near across the compound in a lurching sphere of...

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...the alarming disposition of the natives. And then the truth, so
long concealed from us, came...

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...docile to the voice of their own
institutions; when the tapu is re-enforced they will cease...

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...I was reduced to calling
"House ahoy!" Mr. Muller came down and put his chin across...

Page 199

..."But there's no danger, the natives are all quiet. You're just
afraid of your life."

I do...

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...gain to them, all loss to
him. I asked him what he thought of the danger...

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...what had passed;--useless pains, since the whole
repose, probably unread and possibly unopened, in a pigeon-hole...

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...unison;
which, when they had reached, they were joined and drowned by the full
chorus. The ordinary,...

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...in being moved, and completes the
picture:--"The conductor gave the cue, and all the dancers, waving...

Page 204

...their feet. As the drama went on the interest grew. The
performers appealed to each other,...

Page 205

...vassals thus came uncommanded to the feast,
and swelled the following of Karaiti.

_Friday, July 26_.--At night...

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...their
company, took to his heels, and fled into the church; next moment three
had followed him;...

Page 207

...my humble roof without the shadow of a salutation. I
felt it impolite to have the...

Page 208

...hat and
flowers; and her next neighbour might the next moment strip some little
rag of a...

Page 209

...(or
acts) are played exclusively by men; but towards the end a woman
appears, who has just...

Page 210

...speed, neatness, and humour. A more
laughable effect I never saw; in any European theatre it...

Page 211

...our Chinaman grinding the hand-organ; a fainter
glimmer showed off the rafters and their shadows in...

Page 212

...to their own roof, this chartered
libertine may scamper and giggle through the deserted streets or...

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...bites
her rival. Ten or twenty years ago it was a capital offence to raise a
woman's...

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...cooking-pot. The leg pierced her skull, blood spouted, it
was thought she was a dead woman,...

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...come to our house, the pair sat down
beside her on the floor, and improved the...

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...name. Instantly Nan Tok' held up two fingers, his
friend did likewise, both in an ecstasy...

Page 217

...my wife was unwell she
proved a diligent and kindly nurse; and the pair, to the...

Page 218

...also was dandified for the
occasion. And the two cases stand alone in my experience of...

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...village adjoins on the south, a cluster of high-roofed
maniap's. And village and palace seemed deserted.

We...

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...wonderful for island workmanship, the material always handsome,
sometimes green velvet, sometimes cardinal red silk. This...

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...were to be seen counting the sticks by
lamplight in the open air.

The king is no...

Page 222

...each fresh piece reading our faces with a
look. In vain I continued to protest I...

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...the means
(having a considerable influence ever since the bag) of patching up the
dispute. Even on...

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...may land with his chest, and set up house for a
lifetime, if he choose, and...

Page 225

...one after another
these have been deported. They, on their side, swear they were not paid
their...

Page 226

...his power, _'peaking_, and political intrigue. I felt
guiltless upon all; but how to show it?...

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...red _conjunctiva_, the suppurating
eyeball, and the beggar who pursues and beseeches the passing foreigner
for eyewash....

Page 228

...and in this the commons sat
nearly to their shoulders, and presented only an arc of...

Page 229

...only an episode
in some memories, seemed to have been built, and to be destined to
endure,...

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...lamp and firelight, dabbling among pots. Over
all, there fell in the season an extraordinary splendour...

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...summoned;
she came bringing the right chest, opened it in the king's presence, and
displayed her charge...

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...male, the sole dispenser of
honours, clothes, and luxuries, the sole mark of multitudinous ambitions
and desires....

Page 233

...supposed to be the only
white who ever fairly grasped its principle: a fact for which...

Page 234

...the brawny body of one of
the wives stretched on the floor, a naked Amazon plunged...

Page 235

...scrambling there, on the loose stones, through a splendid
nightmare of light and heat; but the...

Page 236

...smoke. He would not seem
to move from his position, and yet every day, when the...

Page 237

...and his lessons were at times difficult to stomach.
For example, he was sent to fill...

Page 238

...palisade, the crone sentries (each by a small clear fire)
cooking syrup on their posts--and this...

Page 239

...all the lights were out, and my wife (who was still
awake, and had been looking...

Page 240

...a
kind of gallantry, and secretly admired the man. I told him I should say
nothing of...

Page 241

...extraordinary degree. God knows where he collected it,
but by some instinct or some accident he...

Page 242

...be conceived how little popular it made the strangers. Many
villagers passed us daily going afield;...

Page 243

...should be
one remarkable for violent, ugly, and outlandish vocables; so that
Tembinok' himself declared it made...

Page 244

...shook the roof. The time was not so slow,
though it was slow for the islands;...

Page 245

...was but once
asked for drink. This was by a mighty plausible fellow, wearing European
clothes and...

Page 246

...new come from dancing
and singing in the public hall; and his body, his face, and...

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...at my door next morning, bringing and expecting gifts.
But Te Kop vanished in the bush...

Page 248

...forced upon us by an incident which I
am ashamed to betray. The schooner _H.L. Haseltine_...

Page 249

...arms in the lagoon, had forbidden him (except
in one case) all military adventures in the...

Page 250

...immediately opposite Equator Town, which we called Fu Bay, in
honour of our cook, was thus...

Page 251

...group,
of Devil-work.

The plaited palms were what we recognised. We had seen them before on
Apaiang, the...

Page 252

...Reid placed a secret reliance on the
sibyl, for the schooner was got ready for sea....

Page 253

...time administering "pain-killer" from his
medicine-chest, so as to give the sufferer both chances. "I think...

Page 254

...flames streamed against and scorched my clothes. He in the meanwhile
addressed, or affected to address,...

Page 255

...I
resisted--at first instinctively, then with a certain flurry of despair,
in the end successfully; if that...

Page 256

...sell. He was
pressed; he persisted. It was explained we only wanted one: no matter,
two were...

Page 257

...dead, we have all the one touch
of nature: an infant passion for the sand and...

Page 258

...was already doomed; it was to pass from its
green medicine-tree, reverend precinct, and devout attendants;...

Page 259

...to explain.
Terutak', long, dour Scots fisherman as he was, expressed his
satisfaction within bounds; but the...

Page 260

...and in the upper regions mythical. And our king counts
cousinship with most of the high...

Page 261

...on
the ground. Like Tenkoruti, he was tall and lean and a swift walker--a
rare trait in...

Page 262

...he reminded me of Aramis." Such is the
portrait of Tembinatake, drawn by an expert romancer.

We...

Page 263

...his uncle, or indeed employ the word. The same day he sent me a
present of...

Page 264

...of a tall,
lean father, skilled in war, and his own schoolmaster in genealogy and
island arts....

Page 265

...steps of
encroachment on the one side and weakness on the other the present reign
of terror...

Page 266

...of the game.
Tamasese, the German puppet, has had everywhere the under hand; almost
none, except those...

Page 267

...their neighbours, and Dr. Knappe himself (in the
eyes of justice) is no more than the...

Page 268

...from the wrecker ship, an electrical
machine and a mechanic hired, the prison mined, and a...

Page 269

...too resolute King and Parliament had at last and in one
particular defied his advice and...

Page 270

...shown
that he neither understands nor yet is willing to be taught the
condition of this country....

Page 271

...was
required, that was the salvation looked for. And here we have a
Government at a high...

Page 272

...word of mouth, a deputation will be ready
to wait upon you on Thursday, at any...

Page 273

...address in writing as soon as
possible.--I have the honour to be, dear Sirs, your obedient...

Page 274

...specific persons, who correctly described
themselves as "white residents," "the undersigned," and in the
accompanying letter as...

Page 275

...given on the 2nd inst.

From this re-examination I have learned again that your appeal begins
with...

Page 276

...year has gone by since the decision, and the state of the Samoan
Government has been...

Page 277

...forwarded to
the Chief Justice enclosed in a letter of adhesion from the President.
Such as they...

Page 278

...treasury, they learned that they were bankrupt. And with
the next breath the President reassured them;...

Page 279

...his recent conduct had been of a nature to irritate the
councillors, and frankly proposed it...

Page 280

...the money had left either the municipal or the Government safe.

The position of the President...

Page 281

...should
divert (as it seems they have done) public funds and affront all the
forms of law--we...

Page 282

...smallness of rapacity at which all men wondered, refused to pay, and I
believe, still withholds...

Page 283

...me return to my romances and leave the affairs of Samoa to
sub-editors in distant quarters...

Page 284

...found the purchase-money had been
paid in rouleaux from the Government safes. The Government consisted of
two...

Page 285

...destitution and in the midst of growing Samoan
murmurs against the high salaries of whites, if...

Page 286

...firm; and in
case their claim should be found good, they had granted to the Samoan
Government...

Page 287

...only judge. I hear it calculated
that the present state of matters may be yet spun...

Page 288

...a convenient common-ground and clearing-house for our manifold
nationalities. It has now been, for all purpose...

Page 289

...what I write is false, and I should be chastised as a
calumniator; or else it...

Page 290

...an armed picket at a ford some two miles
from Apia, where they sat in a...

Page 291

..."uncomfortable" in the bush. An excellent old fellow,
who had had enough of war in many...

Page 292

...field of battle without further advantage. All night
the Royal troops hailed volleys of bullets at...

Page 293

...three Powers should at last break their vacillating
silence. It is of a piece with their...

Page 294

...in white eye-witnesses. It were to attribute to [Malietoa] Laupepa
sentiments entirely foreign to his race...

Page 295

...should become the victim of a brutal rally in a cow-park,
and have her face exposed...

Page 296

...interested in a mass of men
and women, many of them our familiar friends, now pent...

Page 297

...conjoined with Malietoa as Vice-King; and I
have seen no reason to change that opinion, except...

Page 298

...dogs. And again the three Consuls unanimously winked. There was no
punishment, there was even no...

Page 299

...their former residences, the
pride of the Samoan heart. The ejaculation of the Consul was thus...

Page 300

...them to amuse themselves with the
routine of business. But let trouble come, and the farce...

Page 301

...cats,
along one half of the seaboard of Aana, and in the prosecution of these
manly exploits...

Page 302

...of a gunsmith to repair them
when they are broken, and already notoriously short of ammunition,...

Page 303

...the Samoan mind. "O! we
have had Chief Justices before," said a visitor to my house;...

Page 304

...the Berlin Act)
will probably show us the result in an enlarged assortment of heads, and
the...

Page 305

...had reason to comment upon in the camp of his adversaries. I do not
grudge the...

Page 306

...After the case of Tamasese, I ask it almost as of right. As for
the other...

Page 307

...a broken
nest, there succeeded seasons in which they rested from their labours
and ruefully considered the...

Page 308

...apple of their eye. They made themselves busy in its
defence, they held interviews, it is...

Page 309

...his charges, and in one only,
he is right. The Chief Justice fined and imprisoned certain...

Page 310

...ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




X

FROM THE "DAILY CHRONICLE," _March_ 18, 1895.

[Subjoined is the full text...

Page 311

...venture to call the infamous Protocol--a measure
equally of German vanity, English cowardice, and American _incuria_--had
not...

Page 312

...or to have her letters sent. Every one sympathises. The
German ships now in port are...

Page 313

...as this, though I hope it. It
would be enough if he were brought back to...

Page 314

...Plantation [Spring_, 1892].

Dear Friend,[13]--Please salute your pupils in my name, and tell them
that a long,...

Page 315

...the trees are not so much unlike those at home, only here and
there some very...

Page 316

...his people, who are
brown and very pretty: for these are black as negroes and as...

Page 317

...last year: One of the islanders
was sitting in his house, and he had cooked fish....

Page 318

...in the cellar would first notice a
sort of thing like a gridiron on legs, made...

Page 319

...peacock does) his little tail, shaped
and fluted like a scallop-shell.

Here there are a lot of...

Page 320

...and his little brown breeks that do not reach his knees,
and the bare shanks below,...

Page 321

...call a young
man, though I suppose nobody in the whole wide world has any idea...

Page 322

...another; and all the children ran about playing in the middle
of the trouble, and, I...

Page 323

...gun. "What do you want with a gun,
Arick?" was asked. He answered quite simply, and...

Page 324

...the pillars of the verandah, to
which he clung with his two hands, his mouth drew...

Page 325

...head of a black woman (as it might be his own mother
or sister), and this...

Page 326

...off bright and early
with Palema, for it is a very curious thing, but is certainly...

Page 327

...--Your respected Uncle,
O TUSITALA.




V

TO AUSTIN STRONG


...

Page 328

...they
didn't go about it at all lively; but of course, when it rained, and the
mud...

Page 329

...and, as very few
of them answered at all, and those who did, only with a...

Page 330

...down in one of
his know-all-about-it moods. "It was perfectly simple," he said. "The
cow was hooded;...

Page 331

...had poor Palema, who was let into the business,
and ran until he was nearly dead....

Page 332

...but Uncle Lloyd got his boys and things
together and went to bed.

A little after five...

Page 333

...knew how to milk except himself--where he is about right. Then
came dinner and a delightful...

Page 334

...cannot get them up except in tatters. It must be
pretty dark where they live, and...

Page 335

...my Jack.
They stood solitary, one here, one there. I began to get interested, for
I thought...

Page 336

...in a bustle over Sina's
foot. No doctor came, but he told us what to put...

Page 337

...the trouble came after. There had been an evil
spirit in that room and his name...

Page 338

...set before
the king! The big hall of the new house having no furniture, the sick
pitched...

Page 339

...grown-up, tattooed man to raise spirits and say
charms over me." A day or two we...

Page 340

...called 'boys,' though the years
of Methuselah may have whitened their heads,...

Page 341

...things than for cotton-picking or plantation work, and
handed him over to...

Page 342

...lady."--[L.O.]

[21] A visiting party.

[22] Talolo was the Vailima cook; Sina, his...