The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. 24

By Robert Louis

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...THE WORKS OF

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

SWANSTON EDITION

...

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... 10
[Mrs. R. L. Stevenson to John...

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... ...

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... ...

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... ...

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... 81
To Mr. Dick ...

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...98
To the Same ...

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... 119
...

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... ...

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... 147
To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph...

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...166
To Mrs. de Mattos ...

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...To W. H. Low ...

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... 200
To...

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... 213
To Henry James ...

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... To W. H. Low ...

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... 245
...

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...Munroe ...

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... 275
To the...

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... YACHT CASCO--SCHOONER EQUATOR--
S.S. JANET NICOLL

INTRODUCTORY ...

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... 316
To E. L. Burlingame...

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... ...

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... 377
To James Payn...

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...OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

VII

THE RIVIERA AGAIN--MARSEILLES AND HYERES

OCTOBER 1882--AUGUST 1884


In the two years and odd...

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...he left suddenly for Nice, she staying behind to pack their
chattels and wind up their...

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...before he could earn enough to support
himself and his family by literature: a thing he...

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...ideas of the half of my
own! As if any one who had written a story...

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...good deal of rockery, a little
pine shrubbery, a railway station in front, two lines of...

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...here
with comfort, almost with luxury. Even as it is, we should be able to
get through...

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...St. Marcel, January 1883._]

MY DEAR MR. SYMONDS,--What must you think of us? I hardly dare...

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...he stopped at some little station on the road,
speechless and dying, and it was now...

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...the old
man but was too shy, came to me and said that he knew Sidney...

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...but it's bonny! Hoo mony pages will there be,
think ye? Stevison maun hae sent ye...

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...been the agent who was on our side! But I made the agent
march! I threatened...

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...dedicate them to any one
without meaning it; and you must just try to take this...

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...say he would not use this privilege (?)
above five times, and some he might scorn...

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... BY
ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

ILLUSTRATED BY ---- ----...

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...have had a
scratch of a pen from you; and if it had not been for...

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...the matter of your letter, your remarks on _Great
Expectations_ are very good. We have both...

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...Hyeres, April 1883._]

My head is singing with _Otto_; for the first two weeks I wrote...

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...upon the fortune. I shall
begin it with a halfpenny, and it shall end with horses...

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...stupid that I can only boldly
recapitulate. A phrase of three members is the outside of...

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...upon the waters; and this
novel so near completion, it does look as if I should...

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...GOSSE


_La Solitude, Hyeres-les-Palmiers, Var [May 20, 1883]._

MY DEAR GOSSE,--I enclose...

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...large sums paid on the receipt of the MS. and
copyright reserved, and what do I...

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...preparation of some of the elements of all three
in a glass jar. I think it...

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...in the blue.
By'r la'kin! but these tushes
Are...

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... _La Solitude, Hyeres, May or June 1883._

DEAR LAD,--Snatches in return for yours; for this...

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...and the points of view
are continually, and, I think (if you please), happily contrasted. None
of...

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...pays? et
l'enfant? et la femme? Et enfin toutes les questions possibles.
Ecrivez-moi donc bien vite, cher...

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...shallows
where alone we venture! and how new each sight, squall, calm, or
sunrise! An art is...

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...you will never
weary of an art at which you fervently and superstitiously labour.
Superstitiously: I mean,...

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...faults
and qualities still; only a little duller, greedier and better tempered;
a little less tolerant of...

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...both
well pleased to hear of your marriage, and both Mrs. Stevenson and
myself beg to be...

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...mere priest without
the sacraments, the narrowest tyranny of intolerance popular, and in
fact a repetition in...

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...former days, so now you can take your own
medicine.

I am very sorry to hear you...

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...most
brilliant.

Your Webster is not my Webster; nor your Herrick my Herrick. On these
matters we must...

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...get any one to tell me particulars? Do not write yourself of
course--I do not mean...

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...how long.

I see his coral waistcoat studs that he wore the first time he dined...

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...a vision, like Corsica from the Corniche. He
never gave his measure either morally or intellectually....

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...gone, the pang comes.

R. L. S.




TO EDMUND GOSSE


...

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...trust also you may be long without finding out the devil that there is
in a...

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...you were his angel. We
all had something to be glad of, in so far as...

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...do the Whistle as suggested; but I can usually do
whistles only by giving my whole...

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...In _Escape at Bedtime_, I found two suggestions. "Shove" for "above"
is a correction of the...

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...Art under Mr. Henley's editorship:--

_La Solitude, Hyeres [Autumn 1883]._

DEAR LAD,--Glad...

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...feudal ruins. I am very
quiet; a person passing by my door half startles me; but...

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...have been since
then decading in several steps. Toothache; fever; Ferrier's death; lung.
Now it is decided...

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...do, lad." Down he
sat, there and then, with whole artistic plan, scheme of colour, and...

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...to bed having prelected freely. Fanny
will finish.

R. L. S.




TO THOMAS...

Page 69

...wreck. But the thing of which we
must divest our minds is to look partially upon...

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...number of the Critic as the work of one R. L.
Stephenson; and, I own, I...

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...which had
been conveyed to him through Mr. Henley:--

...

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...for my silence; I am
over head and ears in work, and do not know what...

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...whom it was shown declared it a work of
genius but indecent) was...

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... ...

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...there were who could!
None better than yourself. I shall never forget some of the days...

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...pharmacies? and the bottles in the window
were for him a poem? He said once that...

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...London, I should be the liker
Tantalus--no more. But as for these quarrels: in not many...

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...I have still one chapter to write _de fond en
comble_, and three or four to...

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...do our best, and wear as smiling a face
as may be for others and ourselves....

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...Tell him that I give him up. I don't want no such a parent.
This is...

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...a
week or so, and L150 more in the course of the month; and I can...

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...no hope, but he recovered slowly and returned to Hyeres.
His friends had...

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...safe in gaol
I thought my friends would never fail.
One wrote me...

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...more obvious than the success. For, of course, I
strung myself hard to carry it out....

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...all three sit silent in
the room--by George, sir, it's imagined--and the brief scene between the
husband...

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...I shall get more done, as I generally manage, on my
present scheme, to have four...

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...It is idle to deny it: I have--I may say I nourish--a
growing jealousy of the...

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...when we get
there, we shall have a good time, and see some real carnage. For...

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...even
finished; though so near, thank God, that a few days of tolerable
strength will see the...

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...STEVENSON.




TO W. H. LOW


The verses enclosed were the set entitled "The Canoe...

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...in America?

When they are all on their legs this will make an excellent collection.


Has Davie...

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...of
the Styx. I may say plainly, much as I have lost the power of bearing
pain,...

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...at it well, and you will see much of Dickens. And even Skelt is
better than...

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...say, "Just so: well hit!"

I have been getting some of the buffets of late; but...

Page 95

...being welcomed by
the spirit of your murdered uncle. I should probably not like your
remorses; I...

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...and sits by
the deathbed, and certainly redacts the epitaph, laughter has been lost
from these great-hearted...

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...COLVIN


Enclosing some supplementary verses for the _Child's Garden_.

...

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...and can no more discourse. Say to your friends, "Look
here, some friends of mine are...

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...affectionate,

R. L. S.




TO SIDNEY COLVIN


I had reported...

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...activity. All is at a standstill; books closed, paper put
aside, the voice, the eternal voice...

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...from nature.

[7] Mr. J. Comyns Carr, at this time editing the English Illustrated
...

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...and compelled to carry on conversation with his family and
friends in whispers or with the...

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...of readers, was quoted from a
hundred pulpits, and made the writer's name familiar to multitudes...

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...system of agrarian vengeances and the
persecution of the weak, were means which no end could...

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...the long run merely irksome; and even his persistent high courage and
gaiety, sustained as they...

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...quite in your hands. To parody an old Scotch story of
servant and master: if you...

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...book which (or I am mistook) will please you; it pleased
me. But I do desire...

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... [_Wensleydale, Bournemouth, November 1884._]

MY DEAR CAMPBELL,--The books came duly to hand. My...

Page 109

...as
another; and in the meanwhile let him resist the fatal British tendency
to communicate his dissatisfaction...

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...thus travestied Omar Khayyam. We live in a rum age of music without
airs, stories without...

Page 111

... November 1884]._

MY DEAR SIMPSON,--At last, after divers adventures here we are:...

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...it would be better to change a little; but this, whether
we meet or not, we...

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...not think
you are the man to deny the importance of its role; and I have...

Page 114

...of the two Edinburgh ex-elders, Johnstone (or Johnson)
and Thomson alternately.

...

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...I've muckle mair to say to ye, or, indeed, onything; but
jist here's guid-fallowship, guid health,...

Page 116

...and a part of _Les Femmes Savantes_; I say, Poquelin took
damned good care of himself:...

Page 117

...Mall Christmas
number the tale he had first intended; had tried the publishers...

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...one of the kings of that
country of rhyme without my singing robes. For less than...

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...the nearest I
am like to have.




TO HENRY JAMES


The following to Mr. Henry...

Page 120

...own aim, and I prefer mine; but when we come to
speak of performance, I recognise...

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... _Bonallie Towers, Bournemouth, December 9, 1884._

MY DEAR PEOPLE,--The dreadful tragedy of the Pall...

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...is no more above me
in money than the poor slaveys and cads from whom I...

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...bad time.

Our news must seem very impertinent. We have both been ill; I, pretty
bad, my...

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...you may see that I have merely touched, I think in a
parenthesis, on the drama;...

Page 125

...Edinburgh, "On the Principal Causes of Silting in
Estuaries," in connection with the...

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...to confrontation, dismay is the result. By mere continuance
of years, he must impose; the man...

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...I fear England is dead of
Burgessry, and only walks about galvanised. I do not love...

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...my work; but considering what a year I have passed, and how
I have twice sat...

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...into it by the spectacle of Gordon.
Police-Officer Cole is the only man that I see...

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...is something
nice in the little ragged regiment for all; the blackguards seem to me
to smile,...

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...we had that copyright,
I do believe it would go far to make me solvent, ill-health...

Page 132

...ill-health makes my rate of life heavier than I can well
meet, and yet stops me...

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...was a picture when I showed the original.

I trust your health and that of Mrs....

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...to send _Macaire_ and the _Admiral_ about?
Not a copy have I sent, nor (speaking for...

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...I hate, and am unfit to do; and you will
have to get some journalism somehow....

Page 136

...we renew
these sorrows? The sufferings of life may be handled by the very
greatest in their...

Page 137

...MRS. JENKIN,--You know how much and for how long I have loved,
respected, and admired him;...

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...in a
bustle, and I have been very tired, though still well. Your very kind
note was...

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...will not however gratify your taste; the highwayman is
not grasped: what you would have liked...

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...you would suppose) to write the merest
note. I am now better, but not yet my...

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...me hear from you, and give me good news of yourself and your
wife, to whom...

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...are not inelegant after all. However, had he attacked me only
there, he would have scored.

Your...

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...creatures as myself, who has yet been
obliged to strip himself, one after another, of all...

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...that (in the character of the affections and the airy spirit of
pleasure) make all the...

Page 145

...JAMES,--At last, my wife being at a concert, and a story
being done, I am at...

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...call one;
'tis the attacks on my morality (which I had thought a gem of the...

Page 147

...on the large scale in fate's doings, rather a
marble equality, dread not cruel, giving and...

Page 148

...principle of the hand of little employment. But perhaps my
hypothesis is as unlike the truth...

Page 149

...and sweepingly,
so infinitely more important than the other parts of life, that I
conceive men rather...

Page 150

...too, my first sight of
you in a frock-coat and a smoking-cap, when we passed the...

Page 151

...verses were
better, but at least you like the story; and it is sent to you...

Page 152

...better, for somebody might hear,
and nobody cares to be laughed at. A good man is...

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...LOW


In the following letter R. L. S. accepts the dedication of Mr....

Page 154

...on the forms of imagination, or may not. If it does, I
shall owe it to...

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...with so quaint a grace,
None can choose to stay at home,
All...

Page 156

...deity; and most of all for myself, not perhaps any more noble,
but both more intelligent...

Page 157

...what service we can, for honour and not for hire:
the sods cover us, and the...

Page 158

...you (and
it was very good and very wise of me not to tell it before)...

Page 159

...Eternal had plagiarised from _Lost Sir
Massingberd_: good again, sir! I wish he would plagiarise the...

Page 160

...me, but I have not forgotten a certain white
charger that careered over the fields of...

Page 161

...C. W. STODDARD


_Skerryvore, Bournemouth, Feb. 13th, 1886._

MY DEAR STODDARD,--I am...

Page 162

...I remember you there, though still more dearly in your own strange
den upon a hill...

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...I
suppose the book may seem empty in the centre; to the others it is a
room,...

Page 164

...symptom of a thousand how utterly
they have got out of touch of life. Their dislike...

Page 165

...nearly three years previously, and had now lately revived, that
Stevenson and his...

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...believe me your friend,

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO SIDNEY COLVIN


...

Page 167

...the first part of Chapter VI., Fleeming and his friends,
his influence on me, his views...

Page 168

...is that allowed? It sounds
very funny. Never mind all my questions; if I begin about...

Page 169

...their issue as originally designed, it was resolved to wind them up
for...

Page 170

...poor fellow, as he will never learn your opinion; but for
yours, because, as men go...

Page 171

...true tragedy--to the crows with it, a
carrion tale! I will do no more carrion, I...

Page 172

...it was just then that your letter and your
photograph were brought to me in bed;...

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...of her, which somewhat relieves me, as I am a good deal afraid
of Seraphinas--they do...

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... better versed in the art.

_Skerryvore, Bournemouth, July 1886._

SIR,--Your...

Page 175

...even changed in time; I do not wish to regard music
(nor to be regarded) through...

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...inn at
Kirkmichael, which has always smiled upon me much. If I did well there,
we might...

Page 177

...Boothroyd, Barny Gee, Andrew Silex, the Steward, Carus
Rearn, Peter Mangles, Richard Markham, Fiddler Dick? Please...

Page 178

...was a partner in Cassell, Petter, Galpin, & Co.

[_Skerryvore, Bournemouth,...

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...now for a
hundred articles on a hundred different writers. A critic like you is
one who...

Page 180

...by some Swedish doctors. I hope it may do her good, as the
process seems not...

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...as of mountain brooks,
Might bring you worthy words to stand
...

Page 182

...already shown myself a
thankless friend. Let not my cry go up before you in vain!--Yours...

Page 183

...of the
evidences the other day among my papers, and blushed to the heels.

...

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...Je n'en sais rien, je l'espere.
L'oeuvre, c'est pour tout le monde; le dedicace est pour...

Page 185

...edition of himself; again, he will be very
heavy and blank; but never so violent as...

Page 186

...goose, and the cottage of the
ferryman; and must go floating down time together as best...

Page 187

...I do not think it is a wholesome part of me that broods on
the evil...

Page 188

...peepy and dowie: two Scotch expressions with which I will
leave you to wrestle unaided, as...

Page 189

... ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO HENRY JAMES


The volume of tales here mentioned...

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...pas,
et ne pensez pas, que je deviens indifferent. J'ai devant moi votre
portrait tire d'un journal...

Page 191

... ...

Page 192

... 179.25

Or, the same in...

Page 193

...how? You must not attack all forms, from Calvin to St. Thomas,
from St. Thomas to...

Page 194

...no great shakes. I keep mightily respectable myself.

Coolin's Tombstone is now built into the front...

Page 195

...what hour of the night; but I
cannot sleep, have lit the gas, and here goes.

First,...

Page 196

...haven't a doubt of it. But the Government
cannot, men will not, protect them. If I...

Page 197

...juster. Yet it needs not the
strength I have not, only the passive courage that I...

Page 198

... " maudlin "
...

Page 199

...and pretty and clever and simple and French, and gives
such a good sight of Fleeming:...

Page 200

...lady last mentioned,
whose Christian name was May.

[_Skerryvore,...

Page 201

...whatever; nor can have
any at this stage of my cold and my business.--Ever yours,

...

Page 202

...mean enough not to hawk at
both.

The blood is at last stopped: only yesterday. I began...

Page 203

...barbarians, if such exist. I am
afraid my attempt to jest is rather _a contre-coeur_.--Good-bye--_au
revoir_--and do...

Page 204

...his kind friends, Mr. and
Mrs. Charles Fairchild, at Newport; and quickly made many other friends,
including...

Page 205

...the greater part of the _Master of
Ballantrae_ and _The Wrong Box_--the last originally conceived and
drafted...

Page 206

...so of deck,
among a fleet of other steamers waiting for the tide, within view of
Havre,...

Page 207

...grumbling and backbiting
than one would have asked of poor human nature. Apes, stallions, cows,
matches, hay,...

Page 208

...died of interviewers and visitors, during
twenty-four hours in New York; cut for Newport with Lloyd...

Page 209

... _New York [September 1887]._

MY DEAR LAD,--Herewith verses for Dr. Hake, which...

Page 210

...of things, and really be a little at sea. And truly there is
nothing else. I...

Page 211

... 243 Broadway, N.Y.,

where I wish you would write and tell us you are better....

Page 212

... 110
108
...

Page 213

...that
dedication has been the subject of some pleasantries that made me grind,
and of your happily...

Page 214

...Because, second, we are not
yet installed. And because, third, I won't have you till I...

Page 215

...the shrews.

We are here (I suppose) for the winter in the Adirondacks, a hill and
forest...

Page 216

...the same scale to give him a
monthly paper in his magazine; indeed it is rather...

Page 217

...will suit me. Must stop.--Ever affectionately,

R. L. S.




TO HENRY JAMES


...

Page 218

...water!--and sees some hills too, and the paganly
prosaic roofs of Saranac itself; the Lake it...

Page 219

...have forgotten more than I remembered of business.... Please
let us know (if you know) for...

Page 220

... ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO E. L. BURLINGAME


This is the...

Page 221

...matter, please
regard the above as unwritten, and believe me, yours very truly,

...

Page 222

...a hill-top,
with a look down a Scottish river in front, and on one hand a...

Page 223

..._Laissez passer la
justice de Dieu._

Lloyd has learned to use the typewriter, and has most gallantly
completed...

Page 224

...differently
from your version in a book I have; what are your rules? The Port
Admiral is...

Page 225

...seen it so dark in my time; of that I am sure.

Please let us have...

Page 226

...of the
voice, "_Lovely_--raining!"

Will you take this miserable scrap for what it is worth? Will you...

Page 227

...and your good wishes. It
was much my desire to get to Chicago: had I done--or...

Page 228

...Hudson, Rowland, O, all
first-rate: Rowland a very fine fellow; Hudson as good as he can...

Page 229

...and up at a grey,
English--nay, _mehercle_, Scottish--heaven; and I think it pretty bleak;
and the wind...

Page 230

...in his mind. See Edinburgh edition, _Miscellanies_,
vol. iv. p. 297: reprinted in...

Page 231

...ever
was; and here we sit, my mother and I, before a large wood fire and
await...

Page 232

...B[=a]ll[)a]n-tray. If it is not good, well, mine
will be the fault; for I believe it...

Page 233

...Meanwhile, I will send you very soon a different paper which
may take its place. Possibly...

Page 234

...had it
illustrated, you could let me have one or two for the English edition.

...

Page 235

...part Henry James or some kindred author badly
assimilated; 1/2 part Disraeli (perhaps unconscious); 1-1/2 parts
struggling,...

Page 236

...trapped by Olivier de Jalin. His correspondent had asked
what exactly took place.

...

Page 237

...of Ballantrae_
shall be the name by all means.) If you like and want it, I...

Page 238

...is no red spot left, fires do not
radiate, you burn your hands all the time...

Page 239

...you may believe me, how difficult it is to
put even two sincere lines upon paper,...

Page 240

...even to address him in a letter. He is not an easy man to be
yourself...

Page 241

...and one of these
episodic, and yet it covers eighteen years, and will be, I imagine,...

Page 242

...the
state of my conscience, above all as the Sins of Omission (see boyhood's
guide, the Shorter...

Page 243

...(and
still is) really unwell. I had a mean hope you might perhaps write again
before I...

Page 244

...about that on board the
yacht.--Your affectionate friend,

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON.




TO SIDNEY...

Page 245

...743 Broadway, N.Y._

MY DEAR GAMEKEEPER,--Your p.c. (proving you a good student of Micawber)
has just arrived,...

Page 246

...are dated: his
wife having meanwhile gone to San Francisco, where she presently...

Page 247

...it: and I do hope we may hear something of your news by
each. I have...

Page 248

...which he thought he
was not doing well, troubled with difficulties to which you will in...

Page 249

...harangues
On practice and on morals."

...

Page 250

...of latitude,
the party arrived about Christmas at Honolulu, the more than
semi-civilised capital of the Hawaiian...

Page 251

...a trading steamer, the _Janet Nicoll_, which took
him by a very devious course to the...

Page 252

...BAXTER


_Yacht Casco, at sea, near the Paumotus,
7 A.M., September...

Page 253

...a
straight line from San Francisco to Anaho, the N.E. corner of Nukahiva,
one of the Marquesas...

Page 254

...are in
Papeete at this moment, in a little wooden house with grated verandahs,
two people who...

Page 255

...a
paper-cutter when he left Bournemouth; and it is in the character of
...

Page 256

...over it; and how ragged you will find it, etc., but has it not
spirit all...

Page 257

...voyage is all stored up for the
book, which is to pay for it, we fondly...

Page 258

...one bit. The children
beat their parents here; it does not make their parents any better;...

Page 259

...feet four there is of that sub-chief
somewhat sadly to his bed; feeling that his was...

Page 260

... _November 11th, 1888._

_One November night, in the village of Tautira, we...

Page 261

...November night: I felt
that our positions should be changed. It was you, dear Symonds, who
should...

Page 262

...on stilts, trying to knock each other down, in which
they do not often succeed. The...

Page 263

...windows
open, no one about, and no noise but that of the sea. It looked like...

Page 264

...a look at the other side of Tahiti. The place
of our landing was windy, uninhabited...

Page 265

...more like a Roman Emperor in bronze than words can express. One
day, when Moe gave...

Page 266

...her dress did not matter so much. The chief,
who speaks French very well, stood beside...

Page 267

...will be talked of: which reminds
me of our friend Donat, of Fakarava, who was temporary...

Page 268

...the story, and sat down on the floor in silence, which was
very damping for a...

Page 269

...It would be possible, the
chief said, to send a boat, but that would cost sixty...

Page 270

...a white shirt and
blue flannel coat, which was well enough; but on his plump legs...

Page 271

...North Pole. My handwriting you must
take as you get, for we are speeding along through...

Page 272

...we came
almost to regard ourselves as in the case of Vanderdecken. Three days
ago our luck...

Page 273

...sea _via_ Panama
to Southampton, where we should arrive in April. I would like fine to
see...

Page 274

...to you for
five thousand dollars. Please reply on this by return. Also please tell
the typewriter...

Page 275

...islands." By the way, who wrote the _Lion of the
Nile_? My dear sir, that is...

Page 276

...one word as to money! However, I have got the yacht paid
off in triumph, I...

Page 277

...we were fools enough to go, we were
perfectly in ignorance of where we were for...

Page 278

...Thus does the female
mind unconsciously skirt along the verge of eternity. Our voyage up here
was...

Page 279

...breakers distinctly audible in the
cabin; and there I had to sit below, entertaining in my...

Page 280

...not improbably shall come to Paris in the
summer. Then we can talk; or in the...

Page 281

...nothing of five or six in an afternoon as a whet for dinner.
You should see...

Page 282

...spot upon Tahiti. I have
written another long narrative poem: the _Song of Rahero_. Privately, I
think...

Page 283

...one
will believe that because in time of danger I do not make an
outcry--nevertheless I _am_...

Page 284

...translation of his letter. It begins with
our native names.


_Tautira, 26...

Page 285

...our table: there is what
would make my heart content. But now we are separated. May...

Page 286

...short, I take another year of this sort of life,
and mean to try to work...

Page 287

...I am still of necessity extremely
vague, and cannot tell what I am to do, nor...

Page 288

...I were untrue to friendship; believe me, Colvin, when I
look forward to this absence of...

Page 289

...you have the last of _The
Master_: though I tell you it sticks!--and I hope to...

Page 290

...so engagingly particular, answering (by some
delicate instinct) all the questions she suggests. It is a...

Page 291

...breaking
further out upon the reef. The first is a small house, with a very large
summer...

Page 292

...pitch-boards of the roof, two tables laden with books and
manuscripts, three chairs, and, in one...

Page 293

...whose long silence has terrified me; and glad to hear that you
condoned the notion of...

Page 294

...raging jealousy between the two yachts; our captain
was nearly in a fight over it. However,...

Page 295

...to the circumstances of the great hurricane at Apia on
March 15th, 1889.

...

Page 296

...of her husband's work. The result, in the judgment of most of
his...

Page 297

...which he knows nothing, really) and the
different peoples, the object being to settle the question...

Page 298

...man. How he will do in the English climate again I do not know,
but in...

Page 299

...point; but the
moral loveliness at my elbow blotted all else out; and when I found...

Page 300

...horse for me, and O, wasn't I glad! But
the horse was one of those curious,...

Page 301

...it, because I was ashamed to
do so, and remembered one of my golden rules, "When...

Page 302

...to heaven." Well, what is the odds?
They do their darg, and do it with kindness...

Page 303

...let me stay longer, but if I had known how ill you
were, I should be...

Page 304

...blind,
leper beachcombers in the hospital, sickened with the spectacle of
abhorrent suffering and deformation amongst the...

Page 305

...please make one of the girls write us the news to the care of R.
Towns...

Page 306

...the most interesting
character here; the natives are very different, on the whole, from
Polynesians: they are...

Page 307

...with us sometimes, and sends
up a cook for a share of our meals when he...

Page 308

...in a Chinaman's
house on Apaiang (August 23rd or 24th), You should have seen the crone
with...

Page 309

... know) was never written; Parts II. and III. appeared serially in the
...

Page 310

...to call South Sea temperature; but for all that,
land so near, and so much grief...

Page 311

... Missionaries

" ...

Page 312

... " XXI. Rule and Misrule on Makin. i. Butaritari, its...

Page 313

...you here a copy of verses made in Apemama.

I heard the pulse of...

Page 314

...you by the
first mail from Samoa. How long we shall stay in that group I...

Page 315

...from heat: I have nothing on but a pair of
serge trousers, and a singlet without...

Page 316

...and I shall have done well, and be in a position to
write a very singular...

Page 317

...them; but you must have gathered how hard worked I
am, and you will understand I...

Page 318

...voice of the river. I am not specially
attracted by the people; but they are courteous;...

Page 319

...I know I am not writing like
myself. I wish you knew how much I admired...

Page 320

...20th, 1890._

MY DEAR SCOTT,--Shameful indeed that you should not have heard of me
before! I have...

Page 321

...This and the two following letters were written
during the passage. I again...

Page 322

... In our inclement city? what return
But the image of the emptiness of...

Page 323

...at their singing; also T.'s flag, which my wife designed for him:
in a word, what...

Page 324

...have a
few photographs of the war, which will do for illustrations. It is
conceivable you might...

Page 325

...the same time, you have _The Wrecker_ and the War
volume, if you like either--or both--to...

Page 326

...to nautical ditty.) Which I may however be allowed to add
that when eight months' mail...

Page 327

...first published
in a periodical and reprinted in the collection called _The Lesson...

Page 328

...Fanny has an
evening, but she is about at the end of the virtuous effort, and...

Page 329

...is not
encouraging for further ventures; Sydney winter--or, I might almost say,
Sydney spring, for I came...

Page 330

...frowsy bunk, clinging with one hand to the plate, with
the other to the glass, and...

Page 331

...a touch would
have made revolting, but as it was, was simply charming, like the Golden
Age....

Page 332

...my counsels. Will the correspondents be
more copious and less irrelevant in the future? Suppose that...

Page 333

...a sight of his latest
labours. However, there is plenty of time ahead, and I feel...

Page 334

...be Vailima; but as at the present moment nobody else knows the
name, except myself and...

Page 335

...copy--if yours were really a live magazine, you would
have an exchange with the editor: I...

Page 336

...had intended to pay
back to my capital some of this. I am now of opinion...

Page 337

...cut down for my gossamer dimensions.

I hope you never forget to remember me to your...

Page 338

...but they're good narrative, or I'm
deceived. (You've never said one word about them, from which...

Page 339

...Read the book, and
communicate your views. Hall Caine, by the way, appears to take Hugo's
view...

Page 340

...not like the work. Ah, if you, who know
so well both tongues, and have taste...

Page 341

..._the_ big book on the South Seas it ought to be, and shall. And
besides, I...

Page 342

...Now, here follows the point of interest to you:
such pillars, or standing stones, have no...

Page 343

...friend everybody I
ever saw was delighted to see come and sorry to see go. Yes,...

Page 344

...some seven chapters of _The Great North
Road_; three, I think, of _Robin Run the Hedge_,...

Page 345

...like.

... It is always harshness that one regrets.... I regret also my letter
to Dr. Hyde....

Page 346

...far from
my father and mother. O, it was virtuous, and O, wasn't it silly! But...