The Wrecker

By Robert Louis

Page 0

...THE WRECKER

by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne




PROLOGUE.




IN THE MARQUESAS.

It was about three o'clock of...

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...the drums beat for a man-eating festival;
perhaps he would summon up the form of that...

Page 2

...Glasgow voice. "Look at her red ensign! A
yacht! not much she isn't!"

"You can close the...

Page 3

...you, when I found
your name on the papers. Well, there's no change in you; still...

Page 4

...know the best place to land."

"I never like to steer another man's boat," replied Havens.

"Call...

Page 5

...their
captains, will keep coming and going, thick as may-flies; and news
of the last shipwreck will...

Page 6

...of daylight, and he might have retired from business. As it
was, he built a house...

Page 7

...bottom up. I became the man's bosom friend."

"The deuce you did!"

"He couldn't have been particular,...

Page 8

...a queer yarn," said his friend; "if you think you would like,
I'll tell it you."

Here...

Page 9

...my good. And all the time he never
despaired. "There is good stuff in you, Loudon,"...

Page 10

...and securities.
Since not one of the participants possessed a bushel of wheat or a
dollar's worth...

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...with difficulty, for I was
unused to speak in such a babel, "since it is all...

Page 12

...that he was right: some one
had gone down; a prince had fallen in Israel; the...

Page 13

...come (a frail
cockle-shell) athwart the hawse of Jay Gould; and, indeed, I think I
remember that...

Page 14

...Bierstadt--if you were to put them down in a wheat pit
to-morrow, they would show their...

Page 15

...the idea with a
mixture of patriotism and commercial greed both perfectly genuine. He
was of all...

Page 16

...a victim to one of the vices of the
system. The paper (I have already explained)...

Page 17

...think it might be
well to preserve me from temptation; the architect of the capitol had,
besides,...

Page 18

..."Well," he would say, drawing out the word to infinity, "and
I suppose now in your...

Page 19

...gall and wormwood to my Uncle Adam.
His nails, in spite of anxious supervision, were often...

Page 20

...capitol was a frequent and a welcome
ground of talk; I drew him all the plans...

Page 21

...same business, you may say,
or there and thereabout, was being privately enacted in consequence in
every...

Page 22

...a man who is fond of wine and a lover
of beautiful names, when my eye...

Page 23

...that I was drunk, I was at the same time lucidly rational and
practical. I had...

Page 24

...the smallest opposition. And
this in a house whose extreme area scantily contained three small rooms,
a...

Page 25

...yet
a greater difficulty. I had read somewhere an aphorism that everything
may be false to itself...

Page 26

...it occurred to me it might be wise to forestall all
possible complications by an apology.

On...

Page 27

...proud to own a sobriquet thus
gallantly acquired.

In order to explain the name, I must here...

Page 28

...that I was highly gratified to make the
acquaintance of my famous countryman. It chanced I...

Page 29

...me," said I, thrusting Pinkerton clear through the door.

"Qu'est-ce qu'il a?"[1] inquired the student.

[1] "What's...

Page 30

...novels of Sylvanus Cobb to Euclid's
Elements, both of which I found (to my almost equal...

Page 31

...coining
dollars by the pot, set out alone, without a friend or a word of French,
and...

Page 32

...when I had done, I could but shake my head. "I am
truly sorry, Pinkerton," said...

Page 33

...of it?" I could not help asking, as I
unveiled the Genius of Muskegon.

"Ah, that's my...

Page 34

...having had no previous
experience of the press, I was unaware that they were all being...

Page 35

...said I. "I know you meant it kindly, and you would be sure to do
it...

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...the rest
of the degrading nonsense. What would my father think of it? I wondered,
and opened...

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...not?"

"Oh, there now, Loudon, you're entirely wrong," he broke in. "That's
what the public likes; that's...

Page 38

...my previous
thrift, I cannot say that I was ever practically embarrassed. The
embarrassment, the distress, the...

Page 39

...when the confidant is necessary; and
the confidant selected was none other than Jim Pinkerton. My...

Page 40

...is anozer sing. O, very good, very good."

The idea of the required certificate had to...

Page 41

...with some "Je trove que pore oon sontimong de delicacy,
Corot ...," or some "Pour moi...

Page 42

...to get rid gradually of all
material attachments; that was manhood" (said they); "and as long...

Page 43

...short,
I had a thousand reasons, good and bad, not all of which could alter one
iota...

Page 44

...was scarcely a surprise and scarce a grief to me.
I could not conceive my father...

Page 45

...me that I spoke in ignorance;
that any intelligent and cultured person was Bound to succeed;...

Page 46

...Loudon, I'm so
miserably low that it seems to me silly. The fact is," he might...

Page 47

...it, but there's a strain of poetry in
my nature, Loudon, that responds to it. I...

Page 48

...in any deep concern of mind or pain of body is constantly driven in
upon himself....

Page 49

...a man in such straits as I now found
myself, the hire of a lorry was...

Page 50

...for a fortnight. It might be thought
the latter would appear the more important. It might...

Page 51

...told myself it was but fancy; the next, I made quite sure
it was a fact;...

Page 52

...that Myner himself brought me suddenly and vigorously to the
point.

"You didn't come here to talk...

Page 53

...own account you're not getting on: the longer you
stay, it'll only be the more out...

Page 54

...orphan. Besides, I sought you might learn to be
an artist; I did not sink you...

Page 55

...chosen trade; and the two who had that
day flouted me should live to envy my...

Page 56

...me a hundred francs until to-morrow?"


I had never attempted to borrow from the porter till...

Page 57

...were scarce open
ere the draft was cashed.

It was early in December that I thus sold...

Page 58

...been, in a sense, pressing
me to come from the beginning; depicting his isolation among new
acquaintances,...

Page 59

...me; that I was
no longer an artist, no longer myself; that I was leaving all...

Page 60

...had brought it in a cab, or kept it concealed about my person
like a birthday...

Page 61

...ear, with more of temper than
affection. "I could never forget you were my sister's son....

Page 62

...the curiis thing is, I'm no very carin'. See here, ma man," he
continued, addressing himself...

Page 63

...a sudden change of thought, "I will get him myself."

"Ye will not!" cried my grandfather....

Page 64

...I am sorry you have seen your grandfather in so unamiable a
light," replied this extraordinary...

Page 65

...man, and, I believe, really fond of
you; he would naturally feel aggrieved if there were...

Page 66

...the new capitol encaged in scaffolding. It was late in the
afternoon when I arrived, and...

Page 67

...had left him alone to live and die among the
indifferent; now I returned to find...

Page 68

...You're known here and waited for; I've been booming
you already; you're billed for a lecture...

Page 69

...through. You'll find it all type-written in my
desk at home. I put the best talent...

Page 70

...heart would fail me, and I gabbled. The audience yawned,
it stirred uneasily, it muttered, grumbled,...

Page 71

...evening's entertainment an unqualified
success.

I was in excellent spirits when I returned home that night, but...

Page 72

...copy of his pamphlet:
_How, When, and Where; or, the Advertiser's Vade-Mecum._ He had a tug
chartered...

Page 73

...to hear presently.

The office which was (or should have been) the point of rest for...

Page 74

...of photographs--one representing the wreck of the
James L. Moody on a bold and broken coast,...

Page 75

...of our time was
consumed by visitors, whole-souled, grand fellows no doubt, and as sharp
as a...

Page 76

...office--a portly, rather flabby man,
with the face of a gentleman, rendered unspeakably pathetic and absurd
by...

Page 77

...honesty; if there were one thing he clung to, it was my
good opinion; and when...

Page 78

...broadside of another sort. He was all sunk in
money-getting, I pointed out; he never dreamed...

Page 79

...idea on the
Potrero cars. Found I hadn't a pencil, borrowed one from the conductor,
and figured...

Page 80

...were all gratuitous, pranced for
the love of it, and cost us nothing but their luncheon.

The...

Page 81

...Jays to the rescue!" or, "I say, am I alone in this
blame' ship? Ain't there...

Page 82

...the honorary steward, who has already exhausted himself to
bring life into the dullest of the...

Page 83

...bustle woke upon my passage; above all,
in humble neighbourhoods. "Who's that?" one would ask, and...

Page 84

...Dress
Gala." Many of the hampers had suffered severely; and it was judged
wiser to save storage,...

Page 85

...now expected to do
wonders. Remarkable to philosophers how bonanzas are found in condemned
leads, and how...

Page 86

...it was
worth five thousand dollars, but the Speedys more adventurously held on
until the syndicate reversed...

Page 87

...see already where my hopes were pointing, and begin to blame my
inconsistency. But I must...

Page 88

...very
name; so that if I had come with the songs of Apollo, she must still
have...

Page 89

...you were the heart and soul of them with your wand and your
gallant bearing, and...

Page 90

...blood-money ran
high) knocked down upon the public street and carried insensible on
board short-handed ships, shots...

Page 91

...its
outlandish, necromantic-looking vegetables set forth to sell in
commonplace American shop-windows, its temple doors open and...

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...the wall of Antoninus, and looked
northward toward the mountains of the Picts. For all the...

Page 93

...profit of living, in his days among the
islands; and meeting him, as I did, one...

Page 94

...ain't no doubt of
that," concurred the other, heartily. "Why, I don't suppose there's been
no wages...

Page 95

...the police office, he debated several times with
Johnson, the third officer, whether he ought not...

Page 96

...guitars and banjos in a state of decline. The proprietor,
a powerful coloured man, was at...

Page 97

...piece itself together in my head some image
of the islands and the island life: precipitous...

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...somewhat sickly, as though
the injury had been severe and he was scarce recovered; and the...

Page 99

...railway accident, and shook and started for a
month; and although Captain Trent of the Flying...

Page 100

...the water, which could be obtained by digging,
brackish. He found good holding-ground off the north...

Page 101

...given by Captain Trent in all particulars. He
added that the Flying Scud is in an...

Page 102

...the distance: but it
wouldn't matter what I named; that would be the price."

"It sounds mysterious...

Page 103

...pin-point and descend to that
deserted cabin.

Pinkerton met me at the appointed moment, pinched of lip...

Page 104

...rattled through, to the irreverent,
uninterrupted gambolling of the boys; and then, amid a trifle more
attention,...

Page 105

...scribbled a line in pencil, turned,
beckoned a messenger boy, and whispered, "To Longhurst." Next moment
the...

Page 106

...think of Douglas B.?" whispered Pinkerton, looking
reverently after him as he departed. "Six foot of...

Page 107

..."I can't imagine; but there's something. Watch Bellairs; he'll
go up to the ten thousand, see...

Page 108

...of his adversary's book.

"Twenty thousand," from Bellairs.

"And fifty," from Jim, with a little nervous titter.

And...

Page 109

...telephone. In this matter, I am
acting on behalf of a certain party to whom I...

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...replied, "running us up a thousand at a time,
and tempting all the speculators in San...

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...was thinking of the captain. But where would he get the
money? above all, after having...

Page 112

...in fear of bodily attack. "O, it's
you!" he cried; and then, somewhat recovered, "Mr. Pinkerton's...

Page 113

...had so frequently admired
his iron punctuality, the fact spoke volumes. The twenty minutes slowly
stretched into...

Page 114

...business
instinct: I always knew it was in you, but then it ripped right out. I
guess...

Page 115

...Smith got the
order for the stores. That's what I call business."

"No doubt of that," said...

Page 116

...can run that schooner as you ran one
of your picnics; and we may have luck....

Page 117

...the stair a black
plate bore in gilded lettering this device: "Harry D. Bellairs,
Attorney-at-law. Consultations, 9...

Page 118

...name your figure. Only one thing!" added Jim, holding a
finger up, "when I say 'money...

Page 119

...I felt I almost
hated him for that fear. At last, when we were already in...

Page 120

...were elements in the case, not known
to Pinkerton--the fears of the captain, for example--that inclined...

Page 121

...you, sir! Can I do anything in your way?"

How virtuous actions blossom! Here was a...

Page 122

...sick; never left
the sick-bay aboard the Tempest; so they tell ME."

Jim took me by the...

Page 123

...the galley smoke, no mark of life on the Norah Creina.
Pinkerton's face grew pale, and...

Page 124

...captain, Loudon, with
Longhurst gone home an hour ago, and the boys all scattered?"

"I know," said...

Page 125

...him. "Nares!" he cried, as soon as I
had come to the name. "I would jump...

Page 126

...we took our food with small appetite and less speech; and it was
not until he...

Page 127

...it!" he cried. "I was as eager as yourself, only not so
bright at the beginning....

Page 128

...an impatient greed of the sea, the island, and the wreck, was the
hope that I...

Page 129

...this port? I suppose that's
understood?"

"Well," returned Nares, with the same unamiable reserve, "for a reason,
which...

Page 130

...said Jim.

"I don't see it," returned the captain drily. "One captain's enough for
any ship that...

Page 131

...up last night,
and I hope you won't take it unfriendly that I didn't. I went...

Page 132

...that day; the wedding breakfast was to be at
Frank's; the evening to be passed in...

Page 133

...his whom
he had brought with him for the purpose (apparently) of smoking cigars;
and after we...

Page 134

...similar pleasantries of the billiard
board, perennially relished. The highest note of humour was reached in
the...

Page 135

...glitter of Thirteen Star, two hundred
strong, and beside the garish glories of the agricultural engine,...

Page 136

...a horrid picture of confusion, and its
occupants of weariness and ill-humour. From the cabin the...

Page 137

...humorous, arrogant
abruptness, I observed Jim to be sizing him up, like a thing at once
quaint...

Page 138

...and stared at the foggy
heaven, or over the rail at the wavering reflection of the...

Page 139

...and, as we swept under cloudy Tamalpais and through
the roaring narrows of the bay, the...

Page 140

...rather a molecular reconstitution.
My bones were sweeter to me. I had come home to my...

Page 141

...volcano or the pernicious thicket of the swamp.

He was come of good people Down East,...

Page 142

...of his ship. I suppose he was
about thirty: a powerful, active man, with a blue...

Page 143

...American seamen. You don't
call it American to treat men like dogs?"

"Americans?" he said grimly. "Do...

Page 144

...make me sick to see the men's dinners, and sorry to
see my own. The old...

Page 145

...have the three sticks out of her.' That was old
man Green's idea of supporting officers....

Page 146

...merely cold, but icy with reasoned
apprehension. He would lay our little craft rail under, and...

Page 147

...appearance of the
sea and sky knocked suddenly at my heart. I observed the schooner
to look...

Page 148

...never; in half an hour, Archdeacon Gabriel couldn't lay her to,
if he came down stairs...

Page 149

...me
between the table and the berths. Overhead, the wild huntsman of the
storm passed continuously in...

Page 150

...stretched a point for you;
you can see I'm dead tired; so just you stretch away...

Page 151

...then two;
the captain gloomed and chafed, as he held to the coaming of the house,
and...

Page 152

...most isolated I had ever viewed; but as we drew
nearer, I perceived her to be...

Page 153

...read of nebular
convulsions. A thin cloud overspread the area of the reef and the
adjacent sea--the...

Page 154

...like a dirge. It
was a relief when, with Nares, and a couple of hands, I...

Page 155

...Trent and his men had no better expectation than to
strike for Honolulu in the boats....

Page 156

...and the remains of food--a pot of
marmalade, dregs of coffee in the mugs, unrecognisable remains...

Page 157

...were found in Trent's cabin, neatly stored behind a lettered
grating; Nares chose what he required...

Page 158

...can't much matter, anyway," I reflected.

"O, I don't suppose it does," said he, glancing over...

Page 159

...short shake that means so much
with English-speaking people.

"We'll do, old fellow," said he. "We've shaken...

Page 160

...up.

Nares crouched back into the shadow of the bushes.

"What the devil's this?" he whispered.

"Trent," I...

Page 161

...it means one thing," said he. "It means Trent was a liar. I guess
the story...

Page 162

...giving the cream of our discoveries in a logical rather than a
temporal order; though the...

Page 163

...the papers,
tied them up again; and then, and not before, deliberately raised the
tray.

I saw a...

Page 164

...with the pictorial records in my memory: cyphering with
pictures. In the course of this tense...

Page 165

...only this camphor-wood chest, a singular exception, was both
closed and locked.

I took an axe to...

Page 166

...Trent made no land, he spoke no ship, till
he got here. Then he either got...

Page 167

...sorts of little
fussinesses in brass buttons. And more than an actress, a ship has a
deal...

Page 168

...called _Islands of the Eastern
Pacific Ocean, Vol. III._, which appeared from its imprint to be...

Page 169

...sale. That's the trouble with this brig racket;
any one can make half a dozen theories...

Page 170

...seen any one more put out than Nares, when I
handed him this letter; he had...

Page 171

...his
button-hole, his bearded chin set forward, his mouth clenched with
habitual determination. There was not much...

Page 172

...if you leave
out the way these people bid the wreck up. And there we come...

Page 173

...since the beginning.

I would I could have carried along with me to Midway Island all...

Page 174

...and Nares himself grew silent and morose. At night, when
supper was done, we passed an...

Page 175

...character, might be regarded as
complete adhesion; and the crew were accordingly called aft. Never had
the...

Page 176

...that strike you?" asked the captain. "He may
be right, he may be wrong. He's likely...

Page 177

...the next moment, forgetting their own
disappointment, in that contagious sentiment of success, they gave three
cheers...

Page 178

...not yet sure; there might be yet another cache;
and you may be certain in that...

Page 179

...it's what I'm paid for,
and trained for, and brought up to. But it was another...

Page 180

...turned kind of soft upon
the job. There's been some crookedness about, no doubt of it;...

Page 181

...gone Soft Tommy on this
Museum of Crooks? They've smashed up you and Mr. Pinkerton; they've
turned...

Page 182

...chance (or some
finer sense that lives in us, and only guides us when the mind...

Page 183

...passed again into the
empty world of cloud and water by which she had approached; and...

Page 184

...of us, and seemed to draw near unsteadily.
This was the anticipated signal; and we made...

Page 185

...sight of my distress, which I was unable entirely to control,
appealed strongly to their good-nature;...

Page 186

...and just tower above our troubles.
Mamie is a host in herself. Somehow I feel like...

Page 187

...was a liberty; I know you may
justly complain; but it was some things that were...

Page 188

...AT THAT. I know I would have
fired such a clerk inside of forty minutes, in...

Page 189

...business with a pistol to my head."

"That is all very proper, Mr. Dodd; there is...

Page 190

..."As a matter of
principle, I wouldn't look at this business at the money. 'Not good
enough,'...

Page 191

...you do the rummaging,
you come home, and you hand over ten thousand--or twenty, if you...

Page 192

...fire them now."

Indeed, I believe that was my only reason for entering upon a
transaction which...

Page 193

...close off the buoy and
saw the city sparkle in its groves about the foot of...

Page 194

...and the festivities were
to be renewed that night in the abode of Fowler, it occurred...

Page 195

...cliff. The house was new and clean and
bald, and stood naked to the Trades. The...

Page 196

..."You can say that
with a clear conscience."

"Thank you," I replied. "I shall certainly do so."

At...

Page 197

...monthly nurse. That Trent,
he come first, with his 'and in a bloody rag. I was...

Page 198

...our ship, and by God, here
he is a landed proprietor, and may be in Parliament...

Page 199

...the Flying Scud; just such a man, I reasoned, would be
capable of just such starts...

Page 200

...my
insistence; I judged he was suffering torments of alarm lest I should
prove an undesirable acquaintance;...

Page 201

...earliest occasion; and at
the appointed hour, a somewhat blackguard-looking boat's crew from the
Norah Creina conveyed...

Page 202

...know all; you
are shrewd, and must have a guess that I know much. How are...

Page 203

...yet
no title, to share with you?"

I cannot convey a sense of the rugged conviction and...

Page 204

...body, and bearing; he looked sick and shabby; he who had once
rejoiced in his day's...

Page 205

...the Flying Scud. How
did it exactly figure out anyway? I don't seem to catch on...

Page 206

...said Mamie. "I know a hero. And when I heard of you
working all day like...

Page 207

...current of my tale. I told it with point and spirit; described
the island and the...

Page 208

...concerned for his feelings, James; he is not concerned
for yours," returned the lady. "He dare...

Page 209

...in
silence and see my sick and ruined husband betrayed by his condescending
friend. I will give...

Page 210

..."It's the way she's made; it's
her high-toned loyalty. And of course I know it's all...

Page 211

...not in the least changed on the approach
of death: only (what I am sure must...

Page 212

...I declare the word came in my mind; and all the while, in another
partition of...

Page 213

...left my dinner still unfinished, paying for the whole, of course, and
tossing the waiter a...

Page 214

...see we're doomed? And anyway, that's not my point. It's how I stand
that I want...

Page 215

...with eating this
truck "--as I spoke, I slung the cold mutton in the empty grate--"and
let's...

Page 216

...with the local editor, and owned he was in two
minds about purchasing the press and...

Page 217

...that we don't know, a good deal that we do,
and suspects the balance. There's trouble...

Page 218

...all. You cannot hope to get rid of me at
this time of day, I have...

Page 219

...got Carthew's name is still a mystery; perhaps some
sailor on the Tempest, perhaps my own...

Page 220

...a clearing-house of dingy secrets and a factory
of sordid fraud. And now the corner was...

Page 221

...purser.

"Bellairs?" he repeated. "Not in the saloon, I am sure. He may be in
the second...

Page 222

...a passion, Mr. Dodd," he replied. "And the tall
cataract haunted me like a passion," he...

Page 223

...Shelley
made paper boats, and Wordsworth wore green spectacles! and with all
this mass of evidence before...

Page 224

...boy in a
country town, she grew to be the light of his days and the...

Page 225

...can see for
yourself."

He handed me a letter in a sprawling, ignorant hand, but written with
violet...

Page 226

...first visits to a theatre,
against which places of entertainment he had a strong prejudice; and...

Page 227

...face was changed, and his eyes
flashed. "I will tell you what I did!" he cried....

Page 228

...I had wasted weeks of
time and accomplished nothing; we were on the eve of the...

Page 229

...voice upraised in the "Larboard Watch,"
"The Anchor's Weighed," and other naval ditties. Where had my...

Page 230

...have no guess what hour it was, when I was wakened by the entrance of
Bellairs...

Page 231

...in this
blackness of remorse and despair? There was a friend at hand--so I
ventured to think...

Page 232

..."Seventy dollars--only seventy--in mercy,
Mr. Dodd, in common charity. Don't dash the bowl from my lips!...

Page 233

...haunted by innumerable larks. It was a pleasant but a vacant
scene, arousing but not holding...

Page 234

...lowing of cattle and much calling of birds alone disturbed
the stillness, and even the little...

Page 235

...I was done of general good-will;
and two pieces of news fell in which changed my...

Page 236

...gardener. "He was so pleasant spoken,
too; I thought he was some form of a schoolmaster....

Page 237

...with a sudden fear lest he had gone too far.

He had indeed told me much,...

Page 238

...to some stockbroker suddenly made rich, and the name which now
filled the mouths of five...

Page 239

...company in
wayside inns. He had no pride about him, I was told; he would sit...

Page 240

...done, the cloth was not yet removed, when Miss Agnes
must needs climb into my lap...

Page 241

...run over to the 'All, tell Mr. Denman there's
a connaisseer in the 'ouse, and ask...

Page 242

...the very place for any man to hide
himself--there was the very place for Mr. Norris,...

Page 243

...thought of my quest, a moment driven out by this rencounter, revived
in my mind. "Who...

Page 244

...notice. The foreground was of sand and scrub and
wreckwood; in the middle distance the many-hued...

Page 245

...lamps were lit, the
soup was served, the company were all at table, and the room...

Page 246

...little clayey, perhaps, but the lagoon is excellent."

"You ought to know," said he.

"Yes," returned I,...

Page 247

...a deuce of a deep fellow, and has
the makings of a great financier. Another furnished...

Page 248

...exquisite alarm lest
it should be detected in himself. And on both sides Norris irritated and
offended...

Page 249

...other things, this formula embraced the
dons; and though he always meant to be civil, the...

Page 250

...the least captaincy on his expenses. He wasted
what he would; he allowed his servants to...

Page 251

...so rare in my experience; and in such cases I act upon a system. I
make...

Page 252

...screams, the sound of flying
feet. "You mayn't believe it," says Carthew, "but I got to...

Page 253

...Mr. Froude) we should all
make haste to imitate.

"Why, I'm one of that lot myself," returned...

Page 254

...paused at the threatened corner, like
living things conscious of peril. The commandant of the post...

Page 255

...North
Clifton; and he found in this responsibility both terror and delight.
The thought of the seventy-five...

Page 256

...of the people led him on. He
forgot his necessary errands, he forgot to eat. He...

Page 257

...suits of clothes; and
yet the unaffected creature hailed Carthew in his working jeans and
with the...

Page 258

...whenever I could get it, I
would give 'em squid. Squid's good for natives, but I...

Page 259

...took shape; the
glittering if baseless edifice arose; and the hare still ran on the
mountains, but...

Page 260

...more than a dozen died of injuries. He had a hand,
besides, in the amiable pleasantry...

Page 261

...you are talking to? Can't you talk sense? Can't you give us
'a dead bird' for...

Page 262

...point of breaking up, when a new voice joined suddenly in the
conversation.

The cabman sat with...

Page 263

...as a shipmate," concluded Wicks, "go and ask my
old firm."

"But look here!" cried Hadden, "how...

Page 264

...a pity too,
when you can pick up natives for half nothing. Then we must have...

Page 265

...you carry it out and I
receive proof of it (for I will agree to regard...

Page 266

...not have the pleasure of seeing you again."

"You must please yourself," said the lawyer. "Fail...

Page 267

...to tap them," Captain Wicks used to observe, as he
squinted up their height or patted...

Page 268

...occupied
staterooms, camped upon the satin divans, and sat down in Grant
Sanderson's parquetry smoking-room to meals...

Page 269

...sternpost out of her." And, as Hemstead went to and fro
with his tool basket on...

Page 270

...experiences, this of
the Currency Lass, with its kindly, playful, and tolerant society,
approached it the most...

Page 271

...all Big Muggin."

"It won't do," retorted Wicks. "Not for Joseph, sir. I can't have you
piling...

Page 272

...Set the
cook for'ard with the heads'ls, and the two others at the main sheet,
and see...

Page 273

...days' cruise we've paid for the schooner and the trade. Heard
ever any man the match...

Page 274

...the boatswain of the Leslie; he
had been on bad terms with his own captain, had...

Page 275

...rather a voilent man," he would say, not without pride; but
this was the only specimen....

Page 276

...explanations it will be sufficient to say that they were all
different and none satisfactory; and...

Page 277

...an
iron-bound coast and an Old Bob Ridley of a surf on. The natives hailed
'em from...

Page 278

...instruments, and chronometer;
nor did Hemstead forget the banjo or a pinned handkerchief of Butaritari
shells.

It was...

Page 279

...these disasters.
But the new blow was less magnanimously borne, and many angry glances
rested on the...

Page 280

...of evil laughter.

But this was not at all the feeling of the partners, who rose,...

Page 281

...behind
strange and incongruous impressions. True, every one was perhaps glad
when silence succeeded that all too...

Page 282

...was rejected and
ignored. It was one that would not bear consideration. The boat voyage
having been...

Page 283

...these figures, it was but a step to
opening the chest; and once the chest open,...

Page 284

...rose in his
ears a sound of music, and the moon seemed still to shine upon...

Page 285

...ye mean well," returned the
Irishman, "but you'd better shut your face, for I'm not that...

Page 286

...examined in chief; a
little after, on fuller information--"They call it a bank," he had
opined, "but...

Page 287

...strains. But the strong head of
Wicks was only partly turned.


"Boys," he said, "easy all! We're...

Page 288

...remember to have seen a chest weigh like that."

"It's money," said Wicks.

"It's what?" cried Trent.

"Specie,"...

Page 289

...She was boarded by the castaways, breakfast
was served, the baggage slung on board and piled...

Page 290

...want made clear. You see what sort of a ship this is--a good ship,
though I...

Page 291

...like a man ashamed.

"You're joking," said Wicks, purple in the face.

"Am I?" said Trent. "Please...

Page 292

...stunned with it. There was no thought of battle in the
Currency Lasses; none drew his...

Page 293

...suspended in the brails.
Wallen, the other, had his jaw broken on the maintop-gallant crosstrees,
and exposed...

Page 294

...mouse-like whimperings and groans. Silence succeeded,
and the murderer ran on deck like one possessed.

The other...

Page 295

...gin like water; three
bottles stood broached in different quarters; and none passed without
a gulp. Tommy...

Page 296

...captain
sitting up and watching him over the break of the poop, a strange
blindness as of...

Page 297

...finding one for the grisly foulness of the cabin.

"Faith, I'll be obliged to ye, then,"...

Page 298

...ye don't, ye may take my word
for ut, we'll have a squadron layin' here."

"That's what...

Page 299

...the ship might behave as
he expected, and might not; suppose she failed him, he stood...

Page 300

...over.

The lower topsails and courses were then set, and the brig began to
walk the water...

Page 301

...other.

"Perhaps you don't know how tired we are," said Carthew.

"The tide's flowing!" cried the captain....

Page 302

...remorse in company, and the worst seemed over. Nor was it
only that. But the petition...

Page 303

...caught in the jaw on the main top-gallant?"

"Holdorsen and Wallen," said some one.

"Well, they're drowned,"...

Page 304

...at it like tigers. Get blankets, or canvas, or
clothes, so it won't rattle. It'll make...

Page 305

...are we for that, if it don't look so?"
cried the captain, sounding unwonted depths of...

Page 306

...at the stern.

"One word more," said Wicks, after he had taken in the scene. "Mac,
you've...

Page 307

...was he. "All right," he
said. "Tell your men to get their chests aboard."

"Mr. Goddedaal, turn...

Page 308

...upon certitude.

"Nice place, Hong Kong?" he said.

"I'm sure I don't know," said the officer. "Only...

Page 309

...in all likelihood preserved his reason.

It was the doctor's next business to attend to Mac;...

Page 310

...his influence in the
wardroom to keep the tongues of the young officers in order, so...

Page 311

...what's
all this? They tell me you're passing off as Captain Trent--Captain
Jacob Trent--a man I knew...

Page 312

...of all places) I had the pleasure
to meet Dodd. We sat some two hours in...

Page 313

...said Dodd;
"and then Hadden and the Irishman took a turn at the gold fields in
Venezuela,...

Page 314

...shot," and for
some years Samoa will be good enough for me.

We agreed to separate, accordingly;...

Page 315

...not so many
hundred miles from where we were then sailing, a proposition almost
tantamount to that...

Page 316

...a piece of practice, these
may be indulged for a few pages. And the answer is...