The Wrong Box

By Robert Louis

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...THE WRONG BOX

By Robert Louis Stevenson And Lloyd Osbourne




PREFACE

'Nothing like a little judicious levity,' says...

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...house, and a battle-royal that
he had with a brother tontiner who had kicked his shins....

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...thirty
miles to address an infant school. He was no student; his reading was
confined to elementary...

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...of eleven European languages.
The first of these guides is hardly applicable to the purposes of...

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...bar, and the sporting
papers, must have been anywhere a secondary figure; and the cares
and delights...

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...to
extend it, and it was only the liabilities he succeeded in extending; to
restrict it, and...

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...and the
calculation of insignificant statistics.

Here he would sometimes lament his connection with the tontine. 'If...

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...he had consoled himself by
frequent appliances to the bottle; it would even seem that (toward...

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...it was known
that (in the matter of investments) he preferred the solid to the
brilliant. What...

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...clerk.

It was now time, according to Sir Faraday Bond, the medical baronet
whose name is so...

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...one, for he's clever, and
be damned to him! But I'm clever too; and I'm desperate....

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...cried, resuming a discussion which
had scarcely ceased all morning. 'The bill is not yours; it...

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...the platform of
a station, in the midst of the New Forest, the real name of...

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...windows on
the track, the guard was crying to them to stay where they were; at...

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...death.

Just then they were approached by a party of men who had already
organized themselves for...

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...there was no sentiment in the face of Morris as he gazed upon the
dead. Gnawing...

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...about.'

'Upon my word,' cried Morris, 'if you do not understand for yourself, I
almost despair of...

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...country,' retorted Morris. 'This wood
may be a regular lovers' walk. Turn your mind to the...

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...as they were able the disorder of their clothes, the
Finsbury brothers returned to Browndean by...

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...the packing-case complete; in the absence
of straw, the blankets (which he himself, at least, had...

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...not,' responded Morris, in a more conciliatory tone; 'I only
ask a month at the outside;...

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...couple of
half-crowns. Even with the tontine before his eyes, this was as much as
he could...

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...a dream into the millions of London. By a peculiar
interposition of Providence and railway mismanagement...

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...quite good enough for Mr Chandler;
but the cart had scarcely begun to move forward ere...

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...Mr Finsbury. 'What I tell you is a
scientific fact, and reposes on the theory of...

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...shop windows glimmered forth into the streets of
the old seaport; in private houses lights were...

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...guests with an eye to the
delights of oratory. There were near a dozen present, all...

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...look back on that evening as the most tiresome
they ever spent.

Long before Mr Finsbury had...

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...him the negotiable bill.

'It is not legal tender,' replied Mr Watts. 'You must leave my...

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...board the van. It is often the cheering
task of the historian to direct attention to...

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...a tongue, my dear Wickham, sharper than
a serpent's tooth.'

'Cantankerous old party, eh?' suggested Wickham.

'Not in...

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...the family of a Wallachian Hospodar, resident for
political reasons in the gay city of Paris....

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...but I like to be a JP. Speaking as a
professional man, do you think there's...

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...a formidable
oaken staff, he was a reverent churchman, and it was hard to know which
would...

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...cry of pleasure. 'O, Mr Forsyth,' she cried, 'I am
so glad to see you; we...

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...coming too, do you think, Mr Forsyth?'

"'Statuary with Care, Fragile,'" read Gideon aloud from the...

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...rewarded with a glimpse of something white and polished;
and the next again laid bare an...

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...took the letter, and spreading it out on his knee, read as
follows:


DEAR JULIA, I write...

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...me an aunt!' cried Julia. 'O, what generosity! I begin to think it
must have been...

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...arm, and the pair descended
the steps, followed by Morris clamouring for the latchkey.

Julia had scarcely...

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...quest. Something must be
done, something must be risked. Every passing instant only added to his
dangers....

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...with a bursting sigh. 'He
couldn't tell where he took the packing-case, then?'

'Not he,' said Bill,...

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...become immortal.

There was no created vehicle big enough to contain Morris and his woes.
He paid...

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...'it's exactly the same as the
last!' And he hastily re-wrote the passage:

...

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...doctor will want money down.

12.


13....

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...advertise for a corrupt
physician; that would be impolitic. No, I suppose a fellow has simply...

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...labour in a quarry, to measure himself against that
bloated monster on his pedestal. And yet...

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...of fair, cold water)
made up a semblance of a morning meal, and then down he...

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...turned it this way and that, and even
scrutinized the signature with a magnifying-glass, his surprise...

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...Mr Bell.

'Well,' he said, 'it seems as if we had been victimized by a swindler.
Pray...

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...shall hear no more of Mr Morris Finsbury,' returned the other;
'it was a first attempt,...

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...a pair of crazy studios, usually
hired out to the more obscure and youthful practitioners of...

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...Poor gentleman, he was no
longer young; and years, and poverty, and humble ambition thwarted, make
a...

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...homeward. A
hairdresser's window caught his attention, and he stared long and
earnestly at the proud, high--born,...

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...rather partial
to it, but the smell is so disagreeable about the clothes.'

'All right,' said the...

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...infectious. The lawyer could
sit still no longer. Tossing his cigar into the fire, he snatched...

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...you could bear to touch it,'
answered the artist.

'Somebody has to do it, Pitman,' returned the...

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...send an excuse tomorrow to
the office. We had best be lively,' he added significantly; 'for...

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...but honour; his assets were nil, but he gave me what he
had, poor gentleman, and...

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...like a wedding guest to be quite a gentleman. Today he had fallen
altogether from these...

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...at the window for (say) three-quarters of an hour.
After that you can rejoin me on...

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...if you went upon your knees!' he cried. 'This is the finest liqueur
brandy in Great...

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...colonel (which was an excellent assumption, although
inconsistent with the style of his make-up), his eye...

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...imprudency in the matter of the
low-necked shirt, a bitter sense of the decline and fall...

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...and his companion flatly refused to let him share in the champagne
unless he did.

'One of...

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...done today?' cried Michael, with
indignation. 'Never heard of such a thing! Cheer up, it's all...

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...of charioteer (since this is not intended
to be a novel of adventure) it would be...

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...any
solicitors; we did happen to know of you, and time presses.'

'May I enquire, gentlemen,' asked...

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...he thought. 'Look at
this nervous, weedy, simple little bird in a lownecked shirt, and
think of...

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...be nothing,' continued Mr Dickson sternly, 'but I
wish--I wish from my heart, sir, I could...

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...Hampton
Court.' Then he wrote something else on a sheet of paper. 'You said you
had not...

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...the
key into the middle.

'Poor young man,' said the artist, as they descended the stairs.

'He is...

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...for instance, if he has the luck to find me disengaged; a
string of hansoms may...

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...'A friend of yours: Mr
Morris.'

'Morris! What was the little beggar wanting here?' enquired Michael.

'Wantin'? To...

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...a yellow
goatee, and a pair of lovers debating some fine shade (in the other).
But the...

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...said the lawyer, 'but if you are in need
of money I am flush.'

'It's not that,...

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...a gorilla. Now, you
know me, Michael. I live for my calculations; I live for my...

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...the thing is this, that of course you've
downed the leather business! I must say, Uncle...

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...though, of course, I
understand its general principles, I have never really applied my
mind to the...

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...have come to
compromise.'

Poor Morris turned as pale as death, and then a flush of wrath...

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...I'll be hanged if you're vivacious!'

'What makes you think me deep?' asked Morris with an...

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...man. Got to sit up sick friend,' said the wavering
Michael.

'You shall not go till you...

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...proof, it is believed there
are now only three copies extant of Who Put Back the...

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...and
that gentleman, having been led to understand she was the victim of
oppression, had noisily espoused...

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...flashing the
following very important missive: 'Dickson, Langham Hotel. Villa and
persons both unknown here, suppose erroneous...

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...chord. Not a sound disturbed the quiet of the
room. 'Is there anything wrong with me?'...

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...was a word to conjure with;
the thought braced and spurred him; what that brilliant creature...

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...mill-road of terrors, misgivings, and regrets. To call
in the police, to give up the body,...

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...his mind. A musical composer (say, of the name of
Jimson) might very well suffer, like...

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...been observed ascending the riverside road that goes from
Padwick to Great Haverham, carrying in one...

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...score.

'I suppose they never do begin like this,' reflected Gideon; 'but then
it's quite out of...

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...residence; and if he ever did, it
would certainly be dyed in hues of emblematical propriety....

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...Jimson; I feel sure
he must be nice.'

'Well, miss, I'm afraid I must be going on....

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...her block, when Providence dispatched into these waters a
steam-launch asthmatically panting up the Thames. All...

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..."Gideon" is so really
odious! And here is some of his music too; this is delightful....

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...the girl, with
a flash of colour, 'and showed you did not care one penny for...

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...the deck, he poured forth his miserable
history.

'O, Mr Forsyth,' she cried, when he had done,...

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...no!'

She looked at him; and whatever her eyes may have told him, it is to...

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...who lay so long on the bed of sickness, was
prepared to swear to Mr Bloomfield....

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...is! Great
heaven, the piano should have been here hours ago!'

Mr Bloomfield was clambering back into...

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...the imbroglio; but with
the usual tactics of a man who is ashamed of himself, he...

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...a brand-new D penny whistle, whence he
diffidently endeavoured to elicit that pleasing melody 'The Ploughboy'.
To...

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...my age you'll
play that thing like a cornet-a-piston. Give us that air again; how does
it...

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...the name of the country public-house,
Colour-Sergeant Brand introduced his new friend, Mr Harker, to a
number...

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...trust in the convenient darkness of the night, and drove on to meet
them. One of...

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...of the thing (it would appear) consisted in the extremely close
juxtaposition of himself and Miss...

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...his uncle. 'O, it's all right, uncle, when
we're going to be married so soon,' said...

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...inexperienced gentleman from plunging light-heartedly into crime,
even political crime, this work will not have been...

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...man to be blackmailed? and was Morris the man to do it? Grave
considerations. 'It's not...

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...not fail to
be addressed, sooner or later, to a speechless and perspiring insolvent.
Where is Mr...

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...heard of Bent Pitman! If he had
what I have on my mind, he might complain...

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...tempted; I've
let the credit out of MY hands.'

'Out of your hands?' repeated Morris. 'That's playing...

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...going over to get a cheque
signed by Mr Finsbury,' said he, 'who is lying ill...

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...plain English of the whole thing is that I
must have money at once. I'm done...

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...been seized from an Ephesian bandit, and a pocketful
of curious but incomplete seashells.



CHAPTER XIV. William...

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...daily press?'

'There is not much in the papers to interest an artist,' returned
Pitman.

'In that case,'...

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...it may be from my wife's brother, who
went to Australia. In the first case, which...

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...get your address. I grant the
vanman. But a question: Do you really wish to meet...

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...let me
ask you one question,' said Pitman. 'If I were a very rich client, would
you...

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...policemen waiting for a signal? and
Sir Charles Warren perched among the girders with a silver...

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...Pitman.

'You needn't try that on,' said Morris. 'I have tracked you down; you
came to the...

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...himself, and again and again laughter
overwhelmed him like a tide. In all this maddening interview...

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...straight to
Scotland Yard and turn the whole disreputable story inside out.'

'Morris,' said Michael, laying his...

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...of mind might be very nearly expressed in the
colloquial phrase: 'I told you so!'

'I have...

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...get home.
Even as the sick dog crawls under the sofa, Morris could shut the door
of...

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...you; and
if you ain't back in half an hour, and if the dinner ain't good,...

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...thought it sounded
natural. I begged from a little beast of a schoolboy, and he forked...

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...if you weren't,"
says I, making signs as if I was explaining everything. It was tip-top
as...

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...you that,' responded John with extreme decision. 'I'm going
to put my interests in the hands...

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...and colported
with my own hands, was the body of a total stranger?'

'O no, we can't...

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...too
since that's your taste in literature.'

'Well, what is it?' said Morris.

'It's only the name of...

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...trouble; and, from what I gather, he has already paid
through the nose. And really, to...