Travels with a Donkey in the Cevennes

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed by David Price, email ccx074@coventry.ac.uk Second proof by
Margaret Price.





Travels with a Donkey in...

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...a rallying-point; every one was
anxious to be kind and helpful to the stranger. This...

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...the top and bottom
of the sack by day. I call it 'the sack,' but...

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...Father Adam
were the centre of a hubbub for near half an hour. At length...

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...my attention. Yet
in these vaticinations, the true, patent danger was left out. Like
Christian,...

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...job than
half-a-dozen heated and enthusiastic grooms. I was then but a novice;
even after the...

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...was a lovely day; I tried to
charm my foreboding spirit with tobacco; but I had...

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...am a countryman of the Sabbath, so to speak,
and all Sabbath observances, like a Scottish...

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...hope of this, I must instantly
maltreat this uncomplaining animal. The sound of my own...

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...and an open basket
full of meats and bottles. I believe I may say I...

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...free to thrash Modestine, and cruelly I chastised her.
If I were to reach the lakeside...

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...continued to scale the hillside,
and turned a deaf ear to my outcries. At last,...

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...cut, so that it hurt
sharply; my arm ached like toothache from perpetual beating; I gave...

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...share of
brains and spoke with a cutting emphasis, like one who ruled the roast.

'My man...

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...as to leave a clear field for madam, the cooper's
wife. I drank a bowl...

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...with pricking.

It was bleak and bitter cold, and, except a cavalcade of stride-legged
ladies and a...

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...pole to pole,' sang Alexander Pope; the
Little Corporal shook Europe; and if all wolves had...

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...IN THE DARK


The next day (Tuesday, September 24th), it was two o'clock in the
afternoon before...

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...at nightfall on the
marshes, the thing was eerie and fantastic to behold. Even I,...

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...man, who came a little way with me in the rain to put me safely...

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...sight of some red windows. This time they were
differently disposed. It was not...

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...for you, mademoiselle,' said I, 'you are a farceuse.'

'And,' added the man, 'what the devil...

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...began to show upon my left, and, suddenly crossing
the road, made a cave of unmitigated...

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...would no more come separate. The wind
among the trees was my lullaby. Sometimes...

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...awakened. Ulysses, left on Ithaca, and with
a mind unsettled by the goddess, was not...

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...limped along, for he was very rheumatic, for about half a mile,
and until I was...

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...Here I
wrote, drank my chocolate, and finally ate an omelette before I left. The
table...

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...was marked by upright pillars, to serve in time of snow.

Why any one should desire...

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...Nor was the scene disgraced by the landlady, a
handsome, silent, dark old woman, clothed and...

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...the river, and
follow a road that mounted on the left among the hills of Vivarais,...

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...yet I went on slowly, like a man who should have
passed a bourne unnoticed, and...

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...and kept him informed of
the state of ecclesiastical affairs in England. And he asked...

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...on
strangers that I was not a pedlar after all, I found no difficulty as to
my...

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...religious meditations, and the Life of
Elizabeth Seton, evangelist, it would appear, of North America and...

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...nothing of
innumerable fathers and a great variety of local and general historians.
Thence my good Irishman...

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... And I am astonished, as I look back, at
the freshness of face and cheerfulness...

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...divider.

I am almost ashamed to pursue this worldly criticism of a religious rule;
but there is...

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...the neighbourhood that another soul has
gone to God.

At night, under the conduct of my kind...

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...five francs a
day, and I think most probably the first. Chance visitors like myself
might...

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...as some alarmists in England dwell on the example
of Carthage. The priest and the...

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...mother?' cried the priest. 'Very well; you will convert
them in their turn when you...

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...this moment, whilst I was somewhat embarrassed how to answer, in came
one of the monks,...

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...avoid a protest against this
uncivil usage. He was sadly discountenanced.

'I assure you,' he said,...

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...28th). The room was full of a transparent
darkness, which dimly showed me the other...

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...now done with rains and winds
and a bleak country. The first part of my...

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...laden with a whole pine-tree for the winter's firing. At the
top of the woods,...

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...they declare the thing
takes place; and neither know nor inquire further. And at least...

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...laid and waiting
for him in the fields, where God keeps an open house. I...

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...and gaiters; then I broke up some bread for Modestine, filled my
can at the water-tap,...

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... And love we found, and peace,
...

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...Pacific,' I took possession, in my own
name, of a new quarter of the world. ...

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...war, elected
brigadier of Camisards at seventeen, to die at fifty-five the English
governor of Jersey. ...

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...a little lower and a stream
began, collecting itself together out of many fountains, and soon...

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...salutation. And as all noises are lovely and
natural at a sufficient distance, this also,...

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...two, both married, were both
more handsome than the average of women. And Clarisse? ...

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...and children. Stalwart dangerous
fellows, used to swing the sickle or to wield the forest...

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...toothless, but a man full of prophecy. He declared, in the name of
God, that...

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...the course of his
inspectorship he had given many stronger which all told in a contrary
direction;...

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...cliffs and the river in the bottom of the valley; and I went in and
out,...

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...thoughts of the powers that are in Nature.

Between Modestine's laggard humour and the beauty of...

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...in God; and a tale comes back into
my memory of how the Count of Gevaudan,...

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...grey of the morning (Monday, 30th September) by the
sound of foot-steps not far off upon...

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...by morning; and soon the road descended
to the level of the river. Here, in...

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...preacher.

The old man assured me he thought as I did, and repeated his expressions
of pleasure...

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...engaging girl. The village schoolmaster dropped in to speak
with the stranger. And these...

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...me the spirit of the Southern Covenanters. Those who took
to the hills for conscience'...

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...Presbyterian people still recall the days of the great
persecution, and the graves of local martyrs...

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...a little laid with several centuries, we can
see both sides adorned with human virtues and...

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...recalled the flocks into the
stable, when I spied a bight of meadow some way below...

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...me from the oak. Yet, on this first night of October, the air was
as...

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...bonfire that occupies the
kernel of our system.

I met but one human being that forenoon, a...

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...peaks. The road along the Mimente is yet
new, nor have the mountaineers recovered their...

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...as I have just been
saying, prove variable in religion; nor will they get nearer to...

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...you an ill blow some night.'

I told him I was not much afraid of such...

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...with fire and pickaxe, utterly
subverted, a man standing on this eminence would have looked forth...

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...farmers, it was a very
solitary march all afternoon; and the evening began early underneath the
trees....

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...high overhead, in some lone
house, there burned one lighted window, one square spark of red...

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...exhorted his
brethren to die each at his post, like their unhappy and illustrious
superior. In...

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...Looking up, I
could see the brown nut peering through the husk, which was already
gaping; and...

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...I
should not leave my old creed for another, changing only words for other
words; but by...

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...have its way. In the high tide of war he
married, in his mountain citadel,...

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...of the language to go largely as
governesses into England; and here was one, a native...