Treasure Island

By Robert Louis

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...TREASURE ISLAND

by Robert Louis Stevenson




TREASURE ISLAND

To S.L.O., an American gentleman in accordance with whose classic...

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...and their creations lie!


CONTENTS

PART ONE
...

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... HOW THE SHIP WAS ABANDONED...

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... 32. THE TREASURE-HUNT--THE VOICE AMONG
...

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...you, matey," he
cried to the man who trundled the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
up...

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...month if I
would only keep my "weather-eye open for a seafaring man with one leg"
and...

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...storms at sea, and
the Dry Tortugas, and wild deeds and places on the Spanish Main....

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...the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should
come down from the hamlet, for...

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...opened
a sailor's clasp-knife, and balancing it open on the palm of his hand,
threatened to pin...

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...the
breakfast-table against the captain's return when the parlour door
opened and a man stepped in on...

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...ordered me in with an oath that made me jump. As soon as I
was back...

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...two, since
I lost them two talons," holding up his mutilated hand.

"Now, look here," said the...

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...fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen
out, and I broke...

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...suddenly his colour changed, and he tried to raise
himself, crying, "Where's Black Dog?"

"There is no...

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...I
lived on rum, I tell you. It's been meat and drink, and man and wife,
to...

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...edge.

"That doctor's done me," he murmured. "My ears is singing. Lay me back."

Before I could...

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...his usual supply of
rum, for he helped himself out of the bar, scowling and blowing...

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...or in what part of this country he may now be?"

"You are at the Admiral...

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...I saw him pass something from the
hollow of the hand that held his stick into...

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...and ready to return, there were moments when, as
the saying goes, I jumped in my...

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...we will go, the way we came, and small
thanks to you big, hulking, chicken-hearted men....

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...said, "that key."

I felt in his pockets, one after another. A few small coins, a...

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...holding.

It was a long, difficult business, for the coins were of all countries
and sizes--doubloons, and...

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...into the
moonlight. Nor was this all, for the sound of several footsteps running
came already to...

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...on the road with the
formidable beggar. There was a pause, then a cry of surprise,...

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...far;
you have your hands on it. Scatter and look for them, dogs! Oh, shiver
my soul,"...

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...or five riders
came in sight in the moonlight and swept at full gallop down the...

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...by
this time he had heard my story.

I went back with him to the Admiral Benbow,...

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...avenue to where the white line of the hall buildings looked on
either hand on great...

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...on his Majesty's service; but I mean to keep Jim Hawkins here to
sleep at my...

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...the sport of the search.
On the first page there were only some scraps of writing,...

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...thimble by way of
seal; the very thimble, perhaps, that I had found in the captain's
pocket....

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...cried the squire. "Name the dog, sir!"

"You," replied the doctor; "for you cannot hold your...

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... double to both places.

The ship is bought and...

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... required.

I was standing on the dock, when, by...

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...Seaward,
ho! Hang the treasure! It's the glory of...

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...squire's pleasure was like law
among them all. Nobody but old Redruth would have dared so...

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...his residence at an inn far down the docks to
superintend the work upon the schooner....

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...mostly seafaring men, and they talked so loudly that
I hung at the door, almost afraid...

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...his score," cried Silver; and
then, relinquishing my hand, "Who did you say he was?" he...

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...Old Bailey judge
or a Bow Street runner. My suspicions had been thoroughly reawakened on
finding Black...

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...was again obliged to join him in his mirth.

On our little walk along the quays,...

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...in," said the squire.

The captain, who was close behind his messenger, entered at once and
shut...

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...sir. I believe he's a good seaman, but he's too free with
the crew to be...

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...all if he had ground enough to say that. As
for Mr. Arrow, I believe him...

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...arrangement. Even he, perhaps, had been doubtful
as to the crew, but that is only guess,...

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...with a will.

Even at that exciting moment it carried me back to the old Admiral
Benbow...

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...knowledge made him
very useful, for he often took a watch himself in easy weather. And...

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...Madagascar, and at
Malabar, and Surinam, and Providence, and Portobello. She was at the
fishing up of...

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...of apples standing broached in the waist for anyone to
help himself that had a fancy.

"Never...

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...Apple Barrel

"NO, not I," said Silver. "Flint was cap'n; I was quartermaster, along
of my timber...

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...little supposing he was
overheard.

"Here it is about gentlemen of fortune. They lives rough, and they...

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...so heartily that all the barrel shook, "and a finer figurehead for
a gentleman of fortune...

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...we'd have no blessed miscalculations and
a spoonful of water a day. But I know the...

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..."Only one thing I
claim--I claim Trelawney. I'll wring his calf's head off his body with
these...

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...buried in the fog. All three seemed sharp and conical in figure.

So much I saw,...

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...own I was half-frightened when I saw him drawing
nearer to myself. He did not know,...

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...me a word or two, and as I was able to tell him that every...

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...the doctor, "with your permission, that's Silver. A very
remarkable man."

"He'd look remarkably well from a...

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...we had
made a great deal of way during the night and were now lying becalmed
about...

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...said with an oath, "it's not forever."

I thought this was a very bad sign, for...

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...Mutiny,
it was plain, hung over us like a thunder-cloud.

And it was not only we of...

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...came out
of their sulks in a moment and gave a cheer that started the echo...

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...may suppose I paid no heed; jumping, ducking, and breaking
through, I ran straight before my...

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...a great fear, and I crawled under cover of the nearest
live-oak and squatted there, hearkening,...

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...of poor sailors hasn't;
and you're brave, or I'm mistook. And will you tell me you'll...

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...in the middle of his back. His hands flew up, he
gave a sort of gasp,...

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...more entirely lost than I? When the gun fired,
how should I dare to go down...

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...a man it was, I could no longer be in doubt
about that.

I began to recall...

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...diet. You
mightn't happen to have a piece of cheese about you, now? No? Well,
many's the...

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...had found
an ally, and I answered him at once.

"It's not Flint's ship, and Flint is...

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...you mind, and the six all dead--dead
and buried. How he done it, not a man...

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...that after dark. Hi!" he broke out.
"What's that?"

For just then, although the sun had still...

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...in. One of them was whistling
"Lillibullero."

Waiting was a strain, and it was decided that Hunter...

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...been an old soldier, but more still to have been
a doctor. There is no time...

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...boats, but I feared that Silver
and the others might be close at hand, and all...

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...bad as he makes
out. I have my watch here in my hand; I give you...

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...get ashore at this rate," said I.

"If it's the only course that we can lie,...

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...the
boat. All hands stand by to trim her when he aims."

The squire raised his gun,...

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...squire's shot not having
reached him. Where the ball passed, not one of us precisely knew,...

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...all our hearts good to see him spit in his
hand, knit his brows, and make...

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...that be respectful like, from me to you, squire?" was the answer.
"Howsoever, so be it,...

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...inside
the stockade, scattering a cloud of sand but doing no further damage.

"Captain," said the squire,...

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... mutineers; James Hawkins, cabin-boy--

And at the same time, I was wondering over poor...

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...of his own; that's the mainstay; as
between man and man. Well, then"--still holding me--"I reckon...

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...rising from among
low bushes, an isolated rock, pretty high, and peculiarly white in
colour. It occurred...

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...face tied up in a bandage
for a cut he had got in breaking away from...

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...grog, the three chiefs got together in a corner to
discuss our prospects.

It appears they were...

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...of the island. It was plainly a damp,
feverish, unhealthy spot.

"Keep indoors, men," said the captain....

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...eyes fixed on the water as it bubbled out of the old iron
kettle in the...

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...to him, not he."

"Well?" says Captain Smollett as cool as can be.

All that Silver said...

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...of honour, to clap you somewhere safe ashore. Or
if that ain't to your fancy, some...

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...after four or five failures, by the man with
the flag of truce, and disappeared in...

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...you will take the door," he resumed. "See, and don't expose
yourself; keep within, and fire...

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...were fired on this
side. I saw the three flashes--two close together--one farther to the
west."

"Three!" repeated...

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...A moment since we were firing, under
cover, at an exposed enemy; now it was we...

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...now clambering out again with the fear of death upon him.

"Fire--fire from the house!" cried...

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...but the bones of his chest had been crushed by the
blow and his skull fractured...

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...the place that was
almost as strong as fear.

All the time I was washing out the...

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...a certain tossing of foliage and grinding of boughs which
showed me the sea breeze had...

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...I were to find the boat that evening.

The white rock, visible enough above the brush,...

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...daylight dwindled and disappeared,
absolute blackness settled down on Treasure Island. And when, at last,
I shouldered...

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...far so good, but it next occurred to my recollection that a taut
hawser, suddenly cut,...

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...it on the voyage more than once and remembered these words:

...

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...my
eyes to let them grow once more familiar with the darkness.

The endless ballad had come...

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...hours, continually beaten to and fro upon the
billows, now and again wetted with flying sprays,...

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...my strength for an attempt to
land upon the kindlier-looking Cape of the Woods.

There was a...

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...I can put the paddle
over the side and from time to time, in smooth places,...

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...upon another
tack, sailed swiftly for a minute or so, and brought up once more dead
in...

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...whole amount of her
leeway, which was naturally great.

But now, at last, I had my chance....

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...an empty bottle, broken by
the neck, tumbled to and fro like a live thing in...

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...I said ironically.

He rolled his eyes round heavily, but he was too far gone to...

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...captain until further
notice."

He looked at me sourly enough but said nothing. Some of the colour...

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...chest, where I got a
soft silk handkerchief of my mother's. With this, and with my...

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...men been killed in this HISPANIOLA--a
sight o' poor seamen dead and gone since you and...

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...suspicions proved too true.

He had risen from his position to his hands and knees, and...

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...says he, "for I haven't no knife and hardly
strength enough, so be as I had....

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...had lain so long exposed to
the injuries of the weather that it was hung about...

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...him, for the moment, dead.

Before he could recover, I was safe out of the corner...

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...deck and bulwark.

We were both of us capsized in a second, and both of us...

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...you but for that there lurch, but I don't
have no luck, not I; and I...

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...again, my pulses quieted
down to a more natural time, and I was once more in...

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...evening breeze had sprung up, and
though it was well warded off by the hill with...

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...which drain into Captain Kidd's anchorage ran from the
two-peaked hill upon my left, and I...

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...of the clearing. The western
end was already steeped in moonshine; the rest, and the block...

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...of eight!" and so forth, without pause or change, like the
clacking of a tiny mill.

Silver's...

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...glim in the wood
heap; and you, gentlemen, bring yourselves to! You needn't stand up
for Mr....

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...breast.

"Lad," said Silver, "no one's a-pressing of you. Take your bearings.
None of us won't hurry...

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...lost,
men lost, your whole business gone to wreck; and if you want to know who
did...

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...and last, these thirty year back--some to the yard-arm, shiver
my timbers, and some by the...

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...up, and the red light of the torch would
fall for a second on their nervous...

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...asking--he, the
old buccaneer, the ringleader throughout.

"What I can do, that I'll do," I said.

"It's a...

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...book as well as a knife in his hand, and was still wondering how
anything so...

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...no more. You're a
funny man, by your account; but you're over now, and you'll maybe...

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...it to fancy where your mothers was that let you
come to sea. Sea! Gentlemen o'...

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...from another;
and by the oaths and the cries and the childish laughter with which they
accompanied...

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...curiosity beside me at this moment, but
not a trace of writing now remains beyond a...

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...like a supercargo, he did, right alongside
of John--stem to stem we was, all night."

Dr. Livesey...

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...I'm surprised at you. You're less of a fool
than many, take you all round; but...

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...the time
comes; and till then I'll gammon that doctor, if I have to ile his...

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...are. As you have brewed, so
shall you drink, my boy. Heaven knows, I cannot find...

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...can
only, asking your pardon, save my life and the boy's by seeking for that
treasure; and...

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...fried
junk. They had lit a fire fit to roast an ox, and it was now...

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...bare escape from
hanging, which was the best he had to hope on our side.

Nay, and...

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...pirates, one in a broken thwart, and
both in their muddy and unbailed condition. Both were...

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...besides, was fresh
and stirring, and this, under the sheer sunbeams, was a wonderful
refreshment to our...

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...This is one of HIS
jokes, and no mistake. Him and these six was alone here;...

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...paused commanded a wide prospect on either hand. Before us,
over the tree-tops, we beheld the...

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...a rum start, and I can't
name the voice, but it's someone skylarking--someone that's flesh and
blood,...

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...in natur', surely?"

This argument seemed weak enough to me. But you can never tell what...

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...reached, and by the bearings proved the
wrong one. So with the second. The third rose...

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...I could believe I heard it ringing still.

We were now at the margin of the...

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..."you'll find
some pig-nuts and I shouldn't wonder."

"Pig-nuts!" repeated Merry, in a scream. "Mates, do you...

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...hurry. In a more open part of the plateau, we
could see the three survivors still...

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...cave, and leaving the squire to guard the captain, had taken Gray
and the maroon and...

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...escapade either in the way of blame or praise. At Silver's polite
salute he somewhat flushed.

"John...

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...fellows still abroad upon the island did
not greatly trouble us; a single sentry on the...

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...than
a dog, unless it was Ben Gunn, who was still terribly afraid of his old
quartermaster,...

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...we soon had proved. For coming through the narrows, we had to
lie very near the...

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...captain of an
English man-of-war, fell in talk with him, went on board his ship, and,
in...

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...his old
Negress, and perhaps still lives in comfort with her and Captain Flint.
It is to...