Treasure Island

By Robert Louis

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...Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net









THE ILLUSTRATED CHILDREN'S LIBRARY


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...typographical errors have been corrected without
note. Dialect and variant spellings have...

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... 26
...

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... XIV. The First Blow ...

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... 149


PART V
MY SEA ADVENTURE

...

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... 230
XXXII. The Treasure-Hunt--The Voice among...

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... 51

"Now, Morgan," said Long John,...

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...accordance with whose classic taste
The following narrative has been designed
...

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...the barrow; "bring up alongside and help
up my chest. I'll stay here a bit," he...

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...for a
seafaring man with one leg," and let him know the moment he appeared.
Often enough...

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...and places on the Spanish Main. By his
own account, he must have lived his life...

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...should
come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old "Benbow." I
followed...

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...rather high, so that all the
room might hear, but perfectly calm and steady:

"If you do...

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...he did not look much like a fighter. I had always my
eyes open for seafaring...

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...a fancy to me. "I have a son of my own," said he, "as
like you...

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...have a glass of rum from this dear child here, as I've took
such a liking...

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...running
in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor. At the same
instant my mother,...

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...as I told you; and I have just, very much against my own will,
dragged you...

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...on you, Jim, and that doctor swab," and he ran on
again for a while with...

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...at length, "you saw that seafaring man to-day?"

"Black Dog?" I asked.

"Ah! Black Dog," said he....

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...was shocking, in that house of
mourning, to hear him singing away his ugly old sea-song;...

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...young friend, and lead me in?"

I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless...

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...and with incredible accuracy and nimbleness, skipped
out of the parlor and into the road, where,...

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...than done. Bareheaded as we were, we
ran out at once in the gathering evening and...

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...I would go with my mother; and of course they all cried
out at our foolhardiness;...

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...that they contained, and I began to despair.

"Perhaps it's round his neck," suggested my mother.

Overcoming...

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...my mother
knew how to make her count.

When we were about halfway through, I suddenly put...

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...suddenly, "take the money and run on. I am
going to faint."

This was certainly the end...

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...the chest," he cried.

I could hear their feet rattling up our old stairs, so that...

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...here and there among the lumber, but half-heartedly, I thought,
and with half an eye to...

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...he was on his feet again in a
second, and made another dash, now utterly bewildered,...

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...their furious hunt after my mother and myself; and
though nothing had actually been taken away...

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...us down a matted passage, and showed us at the end into
a great library, all...

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...squire; "Hawkins has earned better than
cold pie."

So a big pigeon pie was brought in and...

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..."Billy Bones his fancy"; then there was "Mr. W.
Bones, mate," "No more rum," "Off Palm...

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...longitude, soundings, names of
hills and bays and inlets, and every particular that would be needed...

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...the undertaking. There's only one
man I'm afraid of."

"And who's that?" cried the squire. "Name the...

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...Anchor Inn, Bristol, March 1, 17--._

"DEAR LIVESEY: As I do not...

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...I found he was an old sailor, kept a public house,
knew...

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... ...

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...nothing but grumble and lament. Any of the
under-gamekeepers would gladly have changed places with him;...

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...street, and that the day had
already broken a long time.

"Where are we?" I asked.

"Bristol," said...

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...and an open door on both, which
made the large, low room pretty clear to see...

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...run and catch him."

One of the others who was nearest the door leaped up and...

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...by
the powers! He talked o' keel-hauling, did he? _I'll_ keel-haul him!"

All the time he was...

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...call credit. Nor you
neither, says you; not smart--none of the pair of us smart. But...

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...was a sharp-looking man, who seemed angry with everything on
board, and was soon to tell...

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...I think I
should have had the choosing of my own hands, if you go to...

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...people, and provided with all the arms and powder on board. In other
words, you fear...

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...the captain were to sleep
on deck in the companion, which had been enlarged on each...

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...with his crutch
under his arm, and at once broke out in the air and words...

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...the trouble
of putting him in irons."

But there we were, without a mate, and it was...

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...say, with great rapidity: "Pieces of eight! pieces
of eight! pieces of eight!" till you wondered...

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...proved the qualities of the
_Hispaniola_. Every man on board seemed well content, and they must...

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...it, and I was just about to jump up when the man began to speak.
It...

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...you're young, you are, but you're
as smart as paint. I see that when I set...

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...a boasting man, and you
seen yourself how easy I keep company; but when I was...

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...you all, sons of double
Dutchmen, I'd have Cap'n Smollett navigate us halfway back again before
I...

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...the gentleman, says you; but this time it's
serious. Dooty is dooty, mates. I give my...

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...towards
the stern, and came out upon the open deck in time to join Hunter and
Doctor...

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...coast. Right you was, sir,"
said he, "to haul your wind and keep the weather of...

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...much as whistled, it was plain enough that Doctor
Livesey had communicated my request, for the...

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...luck and courage.

"Now, captain," said the squire, "you were right and I was wrong. I...

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...came. In the meantime, talk as we pleased, there
were only seven out of the twenty-six...

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...and manned, and the ship warped
three or four miles round the corner of the island...

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...know about treasure," he said, "but I'll stake my wig there's
fever here."

If the conduct of...

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...said he, "we've had a hot day, and are all tired and out of
sorts. A...

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...I had done.

The crews raced for the beach, but the boat I was in, having...

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...a quack, another followed, and soon over the
whole surface of the marsh a great cloud...

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...to save your neck that I'm a-speaking, and if one of the
wild 'uns knew it,...

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...me, too, if you can. But I defies you."

And with that this brave fellow turned...

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...so I could hear hails coming and going between the old
buccaneer and his comrades, and...

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...the figure reappeared, and, making a wide circuit, began to
head me off. I was tired,...

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...heard the word and I knew it stood for a horrible kind of
punishment common enough...

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...I'll make a man of you,
Jim. Ah, Jim, you'll bless your stars, you will, you...

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...in Flint's ship when he buried the treasure; he and six
along--six strong seamen. They was...

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...confidence--a
precious sight, mind that--in a gen'leman born than in these gen'lemen
of fortune, having been one...

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...in, it seemed an
even chance if we should see the lad again. We ran on...

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...and excellent wines, there had been
one thing overlooked--we had no water. I was thinking this...

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...in as they came, we had the jolly-boat
loaded as much as we dared. Joyce and...

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...we then brought round to the ship's counter, to be handier
for Captain Smollett.

"Now, men," said...

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...I
was steering, while he and Redruth, two fresh men, were at the oars.
"The tide keeps...

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...target like a barn door.

I could hear, as well as see, that brandy-faced rascal, Israel...

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...gun.

"If I durst," said the captain, "I'd stop and pick off another man."

But it was...

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...as they ran, and the
cracking of the branches as they breasted across a bit of...

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...behind his mattress in the gallery; he had followed every order
silently, doggedly, and well; he...

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...that second load. That's what I mean,"
replied the captain. "As for powder and shot, we'll...

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...master; David Livesey, ship's doctor; Abraham
Gray, carpenter's mate; John Trelawney, owner;...

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...this: 'Ben Gunn,' says
you, 'has reasons of his own.'"

"Well," said I, "I believe I understand....

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...gigs kept coming and going, the men, whom I had
seen so gloomy, shouting at the...

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...There was sand in our eyes, sand in our teeth, sand
in our suppers, sand dancing...

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...made in Italy, very nutritious. Well, that's
for Ben Gunn!"

Before supper was eaten we buried old...

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...by.

It was still quite early, and the coldest morning that I think I ever
was abroad...

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...over his crutch, got a leg up, and with great vigor
and skill succeeded in surmounting...

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...was shook myself; maybe that's why
I'm here for terms. But you mark me, cap'n, it...

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...looking each other in the face, now
stopping their tobacco, now leaning forward to spit. It...

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...the sand till he got hold of the porch and could hoist himself
again upon his...

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..."the chill is past, and we
mustn't have smoke in our eyes."

The iron fire basket was...

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...the smoke cleared
away and vanished, the stockade and the woods around it looked as quiet
and...

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...In a moment the
four pirates had swarmed up the mound and were upon us.

The head...

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...this breath of time, the fight was
over, and the victory ours.

Gray, following close behind me,...

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...overhaul the
wounded and get dinner. Squire and I cooked outside, in spite of the
danger, and...

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...now to see Ben Gunn."

I was right, as appeared later; but in the meantime, the...

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...observed I was out of
cry of my companions.

This was my second folly, far worse than...

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...said.

All at once there began the most horrid, unearthly screaming, which at
first startled me badly,...

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...go ashore where she fancied. I had quite made up my mind that the
mutineers, after...

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...the fairway, hardly to
be missed.

First she loomed before me like a blot of something yet...

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...furiously angry. Oaths flew like hailstones, and every now and
then there came forth such an...

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...talking, as sailors say, loudly, treading
the innumerable ripples with an incessant weltering splash; and until...

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...and awakened to a sense of their disaster.

I lay down flat in the bottom of...

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...tide, a
long stretch of yellow sand. To the north of that, again, there comes
another cape--Cape...

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...deck, was for all the world like any
range of hills on the dry land, full...

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...to the anchorage. Presently she began to fetch more
and more to the westward, so that...

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...south, yawing, of course, all
the time. Each time she fell off her sails partly filled,...

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...again and hung idle.

This had nearly tossed me off into the sea, and now I...

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...when the ship
was still, Israel Hands turned partly round, and with a low moan,
writhed himself...

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...be right enough in a couple
of turns; but I don't have no manner of luck,...

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...We struck our
bargain on the spot. In three minutes I had the _Hispaniola_ sailing
easily before...

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...that same uncomfortable smile, "here's
my old shipmate, O'Brien; s'pose you was to heave him overboard....

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...answered. "I'll bring you port, Mr. Hands. But I'll have
to dig for it."

With that I...

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...though he were too weak to bear the light. He
looked up, however, at my coming,...

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...head before the land closed around us. The
shores of North Inlet were as thickly wooded...

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...aloud when our eyes met, but while mine was
the shrill cry of terror, his was...

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...that I could spin it out for long, I saw no hope of any
ultimate escape.

Well,...

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...workings of his face that he
was trying to think, and the process was so slow...

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...the mast, seemed to burn like a hot
iron; yet it was not so much these...

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...water. O'Brien, though still
quite a young man, was very bald. There he lay with that...

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...again. I had nothing
nearer my fancy than to get home to the stockade and boast...

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...and higher; its light began to fall here
and there in masses through the more open...

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...way account for.

With my arms before me I walked steadily in. I should lie down...

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...but it was bitterly the worse for wear, daubed with clay and
torn with sharp briers...

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...threatening. If you like the service, well,
you'll jine; and if you don't, Jim, why, you're...

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...a fool but I know pretty well what I have
to look for. Let the worst...

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...faked the chart from
Billy Bones. First and last we've split upon Jim Hawkins!"

"Then here goes!"...

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...wall, his arms
crossed, his pipe in the corner of his mouth, as calm as though...

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...gone, neck gone--that's the size
of it. Once I looked into that bay, Jim Hawkins, and...

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...desired a torch. About
halfway down the slope to the stockade they were collected in a...

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...heart, George, as I'm pleased to see.
Well, what is it, anyway? Ah! 'Deposed'--that's it, is...

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...yarn to nothing."

Silver paused, and I could see by the faces of George and his...

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...chart on yellow paper, with the three
red crosses, that I had found in the oilcloth...

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...piece. One side was blank, for
it had been the last leaf; the other contained a...

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...over the
ship's side. All a-doin' well, your patients was--all well and merry."

So he pattered on,...

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...said Morgan, "that comed of sp'iling Bibles."

"That comed--as you call it--of being arrant asses," retorted...

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...and his last night's victory had given him a huge
preponderance on their minds. He called...

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...upon a tree-stump and began to whistle, spinning round
now and again upon his seat so...

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...that ever you
did, or will do, though you live to ninety. Oh, by Jupiter! and...

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...you. And now, Jim, we're to go
in for this here treasure-hunting, with sealed orders, too,...

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...to be
sure, for all his kindness."

It was no wonder the men were in a good...

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...a sailor
is not usually a good shot; and, besides all that, when they were so
short...

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...more open order. It was, indeed, a most
pleasant portion of the island that we were...

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...along the line of them bones."

It was done. The body pointed straight in the direction...

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...and spoke with bated breath. The terror of
the dead buccaneer had fallen on their spirits.




CHAPTER...

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...in the middle of a note, as though someone had laid his hand upon
the singer's...

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...them together, and kept them
close by John, as if his daring helped them. He, on...

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...wide apart; and even between the clumps of
nutmeg and azalea, wide open spaces baked in...

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...added to my wretchedness, and, to crown
all, I was haunted by the thought of the...

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...of gold. He held it up with a perfect spout of oaths. It
was a two-guinea...

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...to keep up with us. The work that man
went through, leaping on his crutch till...

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...to be
clear of malaria and keep a guard upon the money.

"As for you, Jim," he...

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...and dropped in a
fathom and a half of water. We all pulled round again to...

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...the firelight, but eating heartily, prompt to spring forward when
anything was wanted, even joining quietly...

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...and singing. It was only a snatch that reached
our ears, followed by the former silence.

"Heaven...

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...desire of the doctor, a handsome present of tobacco.

That was about our last doing on...

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...gulf, and were immediately surrounded by shore boats full of
negroes and Mexican Indians and half-bloods,...

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...lost in three weeks, or, to be more exact, in nineteen days,
for he was back...